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Published on Nov 1, 2017in Behaviour Research and Therapy4.31
Andrew F. Hayes40
Estimated H-index: 40
(OSU: Ohio State University),
Nicholas J. Rockwood2
Estimated H-index: 2
(OSU: Ohio State University)
Abstract There have been numerous treatments in the clinical research literature about various design, analysis, and interpretation considerations when testing hypotheses about mechanisms and contingencies of effects, popularly known as mediation and moderation analysis. In this paper we address the practice of mediation and moderation analysis using linear regression in the pages of Behaviour Research and Therapy and offer some observations and recommendations, debunk some popular myths, descri...
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Child Development Perspectives4.43
David S. Yeager23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Texas at Austin)
Social difficulty during adolescence contributes to internalizing problems (e.g., depression, stress) and spurs cycles of aggression and retaliation. In this article, I review how implicit theories of personality—beliefs about whether people can change their socially relevant characteristics—cause some adolescents to respond to social difficulty in these ways while others do not. Believing an entity theory of personality—the belief that people cannot change—causes people to blame their own and o...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in School Psychology Quarterly2.08
Robert J. Coplan37
Estimated H-index: 37
,
Junsheng Liu10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 2 AuthorsDan Li17
Estimated H-index: 17
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Social Psychological and Personality Science3.60
Hans S. Schroder12
Estimated H-index: 12
(MSU: Michigan State University),
Sindes Dawood5
Estimated H-index: 5
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
+ 2 AuthorsJason S. Moser31
Estimated H-index: 31
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Mind-sets are beliefs regarding the malleability of self-attributes. Research suggests they are domain-specific, meaning that individuals can hold a fixed (immutability) mind-set about one attribute and a growth (malleability) mind-set about another. Although mind-set specificity has been investigated for broad attributes such as personality and intelligence, less is known about mental health mind-sets (e.g., beliefs about anxiety) that have greater relevance to clinical science. In two studies,...
Published on Mar 4, 2015in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy2.84
Krista De Castella7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ANU: Australian National University),
Philippe R. Goldin33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Stanford University)
+ 3 AuthorsLisa Feldman Barrett L F131
Estimated H-index: 131
(Stanford University)
Despite strong support for the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD), little is known about mechanisms of change in treatment. Within the context of a randomized controlled trial of CBT, this study examined patients' beliefs about the fixed versus malleable nature of anxiety—their ‘implicit theories’—as a key variable in CBT for SAD. Compared to waitlist (n = 29; 58% female), CBT (n = 24; 52% female) led to significantly lower levels of fixed beliefs a...
Published on Feb 1, 2015in Social Development1.81
Sevgi Bayram Özdemir5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Örebro University),
Charissa S. L. Cheah18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UMBC: University of Maryland, Baltimore County),
Robert J. Coplan37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Carleton University)
We examined the meaning, assessment, and implications of different forms of social withdrawal in Turkey across two studies. In study 1, semi-structured interviews were conducted with children, mothers, and teachers to identify descriptors of social withdrawal. Shyness and unsociability were confirmed through content analyses, and regulated withdrawal, a new subtype characterized by overregulation of behaviors and suppression of own desires during social interactions, was revealed. Based on these...
Published on Jun 1, 2014in Australian Journal of Psychology0.98
Krista De Castella7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Stanford University),
Philippe R. Goldin33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Stanford University)
+ 3 AuthorsLisa Feldman Barrett L F131
Estimated H-index: 131
(Stanford University)
Dysfunctional beliefs play an important role in the aetiology and maintenance of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Despite this—and the heightened salience of emotion in SAD—little is known about SAD patients' beliefs about whether emotions can be influenced or changed. The current study examined these emotion beliefs in patients with SAD and in non-clinical participants. Overall, patients were more likely to hold entity beliefs (i.e., viewing emotions as things that cannot be changed). However, th...
Published on May 1, 2014in Infant and Child Development
Yiyuan Xu15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa),
Alexander Krieg3
Estimated H-index: 3
(U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa)
The purpose of this study was to examine whether anxious shyness and regulated shyness, initially identified in Asian cultures, can be differentiated in Asian American children and to explore how these two forms of shyness were related to children's temperament, parents' acculturation, and children's psychosocial functioning. Participants were 155 fourth and fifth grade children (81 girls, Mage = 10.35 years) who were recruited from an elementary school in Hawai'i. The results of an exploratory ...
Published on Mar 1, 2014in European Journal of Personality3.33
Yiyuan Xu15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U.H.: University of Hawaii at Manoa),
Jo Ann M. Farver34
Estimated H-index: 34
(SC: University of Southern California),
Yoolim Shin5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Catholic University of Korea)
The purpose of this study was to examine whether anxious shyness and regulated shyness, initially identified in the Chinese culture, is found in South Korean children, and to explore whether these two forms of shyness were differentially related to children's psychosocial functioning. Participants were 544 fourth to sixth grade children (251 girls, M age = 11.38 years old) who were recruited from an elementary school in Bucheon City, South Korea. Children's anxious and regulated shyness were mea...
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Child Development5.02
David S. Yeager23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Texas at Austin),
Adriana Sum Miu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Emory University)
+ 1 AuthorsCarol S. Dweck76
Estimated H-index: 76
(Stanford University)
Past research has shown that hostile schemas and adverse experiences predict the hostile attributional bias. This research proposes that seemingly nonhostile beliefs (implicit theories about the malleability of personality) may also play a role in shaping it. Study 1 meta-analytically summarized 11 original tests of this hypothesis (N = 1,659), and showed that among diverse adolescents aged 13–16 a fixed or entity theory about personality traits predicted greater hostile attributional biases, wh...
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