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Psychometric properties of neural responses to monetary and social rewards across development

Published on Oct 1, 2018in International Journal of Psychophysiology2.41
· DOI :10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2018.01.011
Paige Ethridge2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University),
Anna Weinberg26
Estimated H-index: 26
(McGill University)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract Reward-related event-related potentials (ERPs) are often used to index individual differences that signal the presence or predict the onset of psychopathology. However, relatively little research has explored the psychometric properties of reward-related ERPs. Without understanding their psychometric properties, the value of using ERPs as biomarkers for psychopathology is limited. The present study, therefore, sought to establish the internal consistency reliability and convergent validity of the reward positivity (RewP) and feedback negativity (FN) elicited by two types of incentives commonly used in individual differences research – monetary and social rewards. A large, developmentally-diverse sample completed a forced-choice guessing task in which they won or lost money, as well as a social interaction task in which they received acceptance and rejection feedback. Data were analyzed at both Cz and at a frontocentral region of interest (ROI) using techniques derived from classical test theory and generalizability theory. Results demonstrated good to excellent internal consistency of the RewP and FN within 20 trials in both tasks, in addition to convergent validity between the two tasks. Results from a regression-based approach to isolating activity specific to a single response demonstrated acceptable to good internal consistency within 20 trials in both tasks, while a subtraction-based approach (∆RewP) did not achieve acceptable internal consistency in either task. Internal consistency was not moderated by age and did not differ between Cz and the frontocentral ROI; however, the magnitudes of the RewP and FN were significantly associated with age at Cz but not at the ROI. This work replicates previous studies demonstrating good psychometric properties of the monetary RewP/FN and provides novel information about the psychometric properties of the social RewP/FN. These data support the use of reward-related ERPs elicited by multiple reward types in studies of biomarkers of psychopathology.
  • References (100)
  • Citations (4)
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References100
Newest
Anna Weinberg26
Estimated H-index: 26
(McGill University),
Aislinn Sandre1
Estimated H-index: 1
(McGill University)
Abstract Background Abnormal patterns of attention to threat and reward have been proposed as potential mechanisms of dysfunction in anxiety and mood disorders. However, research on this topic has been inconsistent, perhaps because of both clinical heterogeneity in the samples assessed and measurement of attentional biases that is temporally imprecise. Methods The present study measured transdiagnostic symptoms of anxiety and depression in 205 young adults and recorded affect-modulated event-rel...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Psychophysiology3.38
Paige Ethridge2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University),
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
+ 4 AuthorsAnna Weinberg26
Estimated H-index: 26
(McGill University)
Reward processing is often considered to be a monolithic construct, with different incentive types eliciting equivalent neural and behavioral responses. The majority of the literature on reward processing has used monetary incentives to elicit reward-related activity, yet social incentives may be particularly important due to their powerful ability to shape behavior. Findings from studies comparing social and monetary rewards have identified both overlapping and distinct responses. In order to e...
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Biological Psychology2.63
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Ellen M. Kessel9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 2 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Abstract Peer relationships play a major role in adolescent development, but few methods exist for measuring social processing at the neurophysiological level. This study extends our pilot study of Island Getaway, a task for eliciting event-related potentials (ERPs) to peer feedback. We differentiated ERPs using principal components analysis (PCA) and examined associations with behavioral and self-report measures in young adolescents ( N = 412). PCA revealed an early negativity in the ERP enhanc...
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Journal of Abnormal Psychology5.52
Monika A. Waszczuk12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Roman Kotov36
Estimated H-index: 36
+ 2 AuthorsDavid Watson84
Estimated H-index: 84
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Psychophysiology3.38
Amanda Levinson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Brittany C. Speed4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 1 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
The ability to differentiate between rewards and losses is critical for motivated action, and aberrant reward and loss processing has been associated with psychopathology. The reward positivity (RewP) and feedback negativity (FN) are ERPs elicited by monetary gains and losses, respectively, and are promising individual difference measures. However, few studies have reported on the psychometric properties of the RewP and FN—crucial characteristics necessary for valid individual difference measure...
Katherine R. Luking11
Estimated H-index: 11
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Brady D. Nelson17
Estimated H-index: 17
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 2 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Abstract Background Abnormal neural response to reward is increasingly thought to function as a biological correlate of emerging psychopathology during adolescence. However, this view assumes that such responses have good psychometric properties, especially internal consistency—an assumption that is rarely tested. Methods Internal consistency (i.e., split-half reliability) was calculated for event-related potential (ERP) and blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) responses to monetary gain and loss...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience3.66
Zdeňa A. Op de Macks3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of California, Berkeley),
Silvia A. Bunge45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of California, Berkeley)
+ 3 AuthorsRonald E. Dahl99
Estimated H-index: 99
(University of California, Berkeley)
The onset of adolescence is associated with a developmental shift toward peers that contributes to increased prioritization for learning about and achieving social status, and an increased tendency to engage in risky behaviors. There is relatively little understanding about the specific links between these adolescent-typical phenomena, particularly regarding their neural underpinnings. Based on existing models that suggest the role of puberty in promoting adolescent status-seeking and risk-takin...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in International Journal of Psychophysiology2.41
Peter E. Clayson18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles),
Gregory A. Miller52
Estimated H-index: 52
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
Abstract Failing to consider psychometric issues related to reliability and validity, differential deficits, and statistical power potentially undermines the conclusions of a study. In research using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), numerous contextual factors (population sampled, task, data recording, analysis pipeline, etc.) can impact the reliability of ERP scores. The present review considers the contextual factors that influence ERP score reliability and the downstream effects that re...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in International Journal of Psychophysiology2.41
Joseph Dien14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)
Abstract Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is a fundamental procedure for event-related potential (ERP) research and yet there is very little guidance for best practices. It is important for the field to develop evidence-based best practices: 1) to minimize the Type II error rate by maximizing statistical power, 2) to minimize the Type I error rate by reducing the latitude for varying procedures, and 3) to identify areas for further methodological improvements. While generic treatments of ANOVA metho...
Cited By4
Newest
Published in Social Neuroscience2.15
Youngbin Kwak11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst),
Xing-jie Chen6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)
+ -3 AuthorsBrynn Boutin (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)
AbstractPeer relations during adolescence contribute significantly to the development of socio-cognitive skills and pro-sociality. The current study probed the characteristics of adolescent socio-c...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience2.62
Samantha Pegg (Vandy: Vanderbilt University), Paige Ethridge2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University)
+ 3 AuthorsAutumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
Exposure to social stress is a well-established risk factor for the development and recurrence of depression. Reduced neural responsiveness to monetary reward has been associated with greater symptoms following stress exposure. It remains unclear whether reduced reward responsiveness serves as a mediator or moderator of the effects of stress on internalizing symptoms or whether similar patterns emerge with responses to social reward. We addressed this issue by measuring lifetime stress exposure ...
Published on Jul 5, 2019in bioRxiv
Alexandra Michelle Muir (BYU: Brigham Young University), Kaylie A. Carbine5
Estimated H-index: 5
(BYU: Brigham Young University)
+ 3 AuthorsMichael J. Larson34
Estimated H-index: 34
(BYU: Brigham Young University)
The impact of individual differences on performance monitoring and psychopathology is a question of active debate. Personality traits associated with psychopathology may be related to poor internal performance monitoring (as measured by the error-related negativity [ERN]) but intact external performance monitoring (as measured by the reward positivity [RewP]), suggesting that there are underlying neural differences between internal and external performance monitoring processes. We tested the rel...
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Biological Psychology2.63
Aislinn Sandre1
Estimated H-index: 1
(McGill University),
Rosemary C. Bagot2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University),
Anna Weinberg26
Estimated H-index: 26
(McGill University)
Abstract Individual differences in neural response to appetitive and aversive stimuli may confer vulnerability to stress-related psychopathology, including depression and anxiety. However, the specificity of this association with symptoms of depression and anxiety within the context of real-world stress is not well understood. The present study examined whether neural responses to appetitive and aversive images, measured by the late positive potential (LPP), prospectively predict symptoms of dep...
Published on May 31, 2019in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience2.62
Brent I. Rappaport (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis), Laura Hennefield1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
+ 5 AuthorsDeanna M75
Estimated H-index: 75
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
Peer victimization (or bullying) is a known risk factor for depression, especially among youth. However, the mechanisms connecting victimization experience to depression symptoms remains unknown. As depression is known to be associated with neural blunting to monetary rewards, aberrant responsiveness to social rewards may be a key deficit connecting socially stressful experiences with later depression. We therefore sought to determine whether adolescents’ experiences with social stress would be ...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology3.41
Dara E. Babinski14
Estimated H-index: 14
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
+ 2 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Many youth with ADHD experience peer difficulties, but the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction remain unknown. Very little work has examined neurophysiological measures of social feedback processing in relation to ADHD symptoms. The goal of this study was to examine associations of ADHD symptoms with indicators of sensitivity to social feedback in a laboratory task and self-report of rejection sensitivity. A large community sample of 10- to 15-year-old adolescents (N = 391; Mage = 12.64, 48.6...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in International Journal of Psychophysiology2.41
Iulia Banica (McGill University), Aislinn Sandre1
Estimated H-index: 1
(McGill University),
Anna Weinberg26
Estimated H-index: 26
(McGill University)
Abstract Error monitoring is crucial for survival and adaptation, and can be indexed by the error-related negativity (ERN), a fronto-centrally located negative deflection in the event-related potential (ERP) waveform that differentiates erroneous from correct responses within 100 ms of a response. The ERN is seen as an early neural signal indicating the need to adjust performance and increase executive control. Previous findings indicate that punishing errors increases ERN magnitude, and that pu...
Published on Oct 11, 2018in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience3.66
Paige Ethridge2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University),
Aislinn Sandre1
Estimated H-index: 1
(McGill University)
+ 1 AuthorsAnna Weinberg26
Estimated H-index: 26
(McGill University)