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Body ownership and agency altered by an electromyographically controlled robotic arm

Published on May 1, 2018in Royal Society Open Science2.52
· DOI :10.1098/rsos.172170
Yuki Sato1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Rits: Ritsumeikan University),
Toshihiro Kawase6
Estimated H-index: 6
(TITech: Tokyo Institute of Technology)
+ 2 AuthorsKenji Kansaku20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Electro-Communications)
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Abstract
Understanding how we consciously experience our bodies is a fundamental issue in cognitive neuroscience. Two fundamental components of this are the sense of body ownership (the experience of the body as one9s own) and the sense of agency (the feeling of control over one9s bodily actions). These constructs have been used to investigate the incorporation of prostheses. To date, however, no evidence has been provided showing whether representations of ownership and agency in amputees are altered when operating a robotic prosthesis. Here we investigated a robotic arm using myoelectric control, for which the user varied the joint position continuously, in a rubber hand illusion task. Fifteen able-bodied participants and three trans-radial amputees were instructed to contract their wrist flexors/extensors alternately, and to watch the robotic arm move. The sense of ownership in both groups was extended to the robotic arm when the wrists of the real and robotic arm were flexed/extended synchronously, with the effect being smaller when they moved in opposite directions. Both groups also experienced a sense of agency over the robotic arm. These results suggest that these experimental settings induced successful incorporation of the prosthesis, at least for the amputees who took part in the present study.
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  • References (39)
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References39
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Progress in Brain Research2.96
Yuki Sato1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Toshihiro Kawase6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 2 AuthorsKenji Kansaku20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Electro-Communications)
Abstract Understanding how we consciously experience our bodies is a fundamental issue in both psychology and neuroscience. To date, the incorporation of nonbody objects into the body representation has been investigated extensively, and the incorporation of prosthetic arms in amputees has been demonstrated using the rubber hand illusion. In this study, we investigated the incorporation of prosthetic arms in amputees using the crossed hands illusion, in which successive somatosensory stimuli are...
Published on Oct 26, 2016in The Journal of Neuroscience6.07
Makoto Wada9
Estimated H-index: 9
,
Kouji Takano11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 2 AuthorsKenji Kansaku20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Electro-Communications)
The ownership of one9s body parts represents a fundamental aspect of self-consciousness. Accumulating empirical evidence supports the existence of this concept in humans and nonhuman primates, but it is unclear whether nonprimate mammals experience similar feelings. Therefore, the present study used rubber tails to investigate body ownership in rodents. When the real tails and rubber tails were synchronously stroked, the mice responded as if their own tails were touched when the rubber tails wer...
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Behavior Research Methods4.06
Emilie Caspar7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ULB: Université libre de Bruxelles),
Albert De Beir5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 3 AuthorsBram Vanderborght32
Estimated H-index: 32
The rubber hand illusion is an experimental paradigm in which participants consider a fake hand to be part of their body. This paradigm has been used in many domains of psychology (i.e., research on pain, body ownership, agency) and is of clinical importance. The classic rubber hand paradigm nevertheless suffers from limitations, such as the absence of active motion or the reliance on approximate measurements, which makes strict experimental conditions difficult to obtain. Here, we report on the...
Published on May 1, 2015in Consciousness and Cognition1.85
Paul M. Jenkinson14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Hertfordshire),
Catherine Preston13
Estimated H-index: 13
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
Abstract No previous study has simultaneously examined body ownership and agency in healthy subjects during mirror self-observation. We used a moving rubber hand illusion to examine how both body ownership and agency are affected by seeing (i) the body moving in a mirror, compared with (ii) directly viewing the moving hand, and (iii) seeing a visually identical hand rotated by 180°. We elicited ownership of the hand using direct visual feedback, finding this effect was further enhanced when look...
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Neuropsychologia2.87
Daniele Romano9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Milan),
Elisa Caffa1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Milan)
+ 2 AuthorsAngelo Maravita30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Milan)
Abstract The representation of one׳s own body sets the border of the self, but also shapes the space where we interact with external objects. Under particular conditions, such as in the rubber hand illusion external objects can be incorporated in one׳s own body representation, following congruent visuo-tactile stroking of one׳s own and a fake hand. This procedure induces an illusory sense of ownership for the fake hand and a shift of proprioceptive localization of the own hand towards the fake h...
Published on Nov 1, 2014in Consciousness and Cognition1.85
Andreas Kalckert7
Estimated H-index: 7
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
H. Henrik Ehrsson35
Estimated H-index: 35
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is a perceptual illusion in which participants perceive a model hand as part of their own body. Here, through the use of one questionnaire experiment and two proprioceptive drift experiments, we investigated the effect of distance (12, 27.5, and 43 cm) in the vertical plane on both the moving and classical RHI. In both versions of the illusion, we found an effect of distance on ownership of the rubber hand for both measures tested. Our results further suggested tha...
Published on Oct 1, 2014in IEEE Transactions on Haptics2.76
Jumpei Arata14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Kyushu University),
Masashi Hattori1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Nagoya Institute of Technology)
+ 1 AuthorsMasamichi Sakaguchi13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Nagoya Institute of Technology)
The rubber hand illusion is a well-known multisensory illusion. In brief, watching a rubber hand being stroked by a paintbrush while one’s own unseen hand is synchronously stroked causes the rubber hand to be attributed to one’s own body and to “feel like it’s my hand.” The rubber hand illusion is thought to be triggered by the synchronized tactile stimulation of both the subject’s hand and the fake hand. To extend the conventional rubber hand illusion, we introduce robotic technology in the for...
Published on Aug 1, 2014in Perception1.50
Charles Michel10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford),
Carlos Velasco20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Oxford)
+ 1 AuthorsCharles Spence86
Estimated H-index: 86
(University of Oxford)
We report two experiments, based on a novel variant of the Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI), in which tactile stimulation is referred to an artificial (out-of-body) tongue. In the experiments reported here the participant's tongue was stimulated while they looked at a mirrored dummy tongue. On average, the participants agreed with the statement that they felt as if they had been touched in the location where they saw the rubber tongue being touched (experiment 1), thus demonstrating visual capture. Wh...
Published on Jul 4, 2014in Neurocase1.11
Laura Schmalzl15
Estimated H-index: 15
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
Andreas Kalckert7
Estimated H-index: 7
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
+ 1 AuthorsH. Henrik Ehrsson35
Estimated H-index: 35
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
One of the current challenges in the field of advanced prosthetics is the development of artificial limbs that provide the user with detailed sensory feedback. Sensory feedback from our limbs is not only important for proprioceptive awareness and motor control, but also essential for providing us with a feeling of ownership or simply put, the sensation that our limbs actually belong to ourselves. The strong link between sensory feedback and ownership has been repeatedly demonstrated with the so-...
Published on May 1, 2014in Consciousness and Cognition1.85
Andreas Kalckert7
Estimated H-index: 7
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
H. Henrik Ehrsson15
Estimated H-index: 15
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
Abstract The rubber hand illusion is a perceptual illusion in which a model hand is experienced as part of one’s own body. In the present study we directly compared the classical illusion, based on visuotactile stimulation, with a rubber hand illusion based on active and passive movements. We examined the question of which combinations of sensory and motor cues are the most potent in inducing the illusion by subjective ratings and an objective measure (proprioceptive drift). In particular, we we...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Ananya S. Dhawan (GMU: George Mason University), Biswarup Mukherjee3
Estimated H-index: 3
(GMU: George Mason University)
+ 7 AuthorsSiddhartha Sikdar16
Estimated H-index: 16
(GMU: George Mason University)
Technological advances in multi-articulated prosthetic hands have outpaced the development of methods to intuitively control these devices. In fact, prosthetic users often cite "difficulty of use" as a key contributing factor for abandoning their prostheses. To overcome the limitations of the currently pervasive myoelectric control strategies, namely unintuitive proportional control of multiple degrees-of-freedom, we propose a novel approach: proprioceptive sonomyographic control. Unlike myoelec...