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Acoustic communication in fishes: Temperature plays a role

Published on Jul 1, 2018in Fish and Fisheries6.655
· DOI :10.1111/faf.12277
Friedrich Ladich35
Estimated H-index: 35
(University of Vienna)
Abstract
  • References (62)
  • Citations (5)
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ABSTRACT Sound propagates much faster and over larger distances in water than in air, mainly because of differences in the density of these media. This raises the question of whether terrestrial (land mammals, birds) and (semi-)aquatic animals (frogs, fishes, cetaceans) differ fundamentally in the way they communicate acoustically. Terrestrial vertebrates primarily produce sounds by vibrating vocal tissue (folds) directly in an airflow. This mechanism has been modified in frogs and cetaceans, wh...
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#1Ashwin A. Bhandiwad (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 5
#2Elizabeth A. Whitchurch (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 3
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Adult female and nesting (type I) male midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) exhibit an adaptive form of auditory plasticity for the enhanced detection of social acoustic signals. Whether this adaptive plasticity also occurs in “sneaker” type II males is unknown. Here, we characterize auditory-evoked potentials recorded from hair cells in the saccule of reproductive and non-reproductive “sneaker” type II male midshipman to determine whether this sexual phenotype exhibits seasonal, reproductive st...
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#1Eric W. Montie (University of South Carolina Beaufort)H-Index: 14
#2Matt Hoover (University of South Carolina Beaufort)H-Index: 1
Last. Michael R. Denson (South Carolina Department of Natural Resources)H-Index: 14
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#1Aaron N. Rice (Cornell University)H-Index: 18
#2Janelle L. Morano (Cornell University)H-Index: 5
Last. Charles A. Muirhead (University of Massachusetts Boston)H-Index: 4
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Many fish species produce sounds as a part of their reproductive behavior. Using passive acoustic recording approaches, these sounds can be used to document temporal and spatial patterns of reproductive activity of fish populations. We conducted an 11-month passive acoustic survey at three different locations off the coasts of Georgia (40 km north of Grays Reef National Marine Sanctuary) and North Carolina (Onslow Bay) to understand the spawning phenology of two species of acoustically active fi...
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#1Eric W. Montie (University of South Carolina Beaufort)H-Index: 14
#2Chris Kehrer (University of South Carolina Beaufort)H-Index: 2
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#1Friedrich Ladich (University of Vienna)H-Index: 35
#2Tanja Schulz-Mirbach (LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)H-Index: 17
An astonishing diversity of inner ears and accessory hearing structures (AHS) that can enhance hearing has evolved in fishes. Inner ears mainly differ in the size of the otolith end organs, the shape and orientation of the sensory epithelia, and the orientation patterns of ciliary bundles of sensory hair cells. Despite our profound morphological knowledge of inner ear variation, two main questions remain widely unanswered. (i) What selective forces and/or constraints led to the evolution of this...
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Abstract The painted goby Pomatoschistus pictus emits courtship sounds (drums) that are important in reproductive outcome. The effect of temperature (14–22 °C) on courtship drum features was characterised. Pulse period (or rate) was linearly related with temperature (R 2 = 0.83) presenting a Q 10 of 2.13. Pulse period decreased by 1.95 ms per 1 °C and varied from 34 ms to 18.6 ms within the studied temperature range. Sound duration changed concomitantly from 1128 ms to 658 ms. Changes in sound d...
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#1Marta Bolgan (University of Liège)H-Index: 5
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Abstract Although many fish species are vocal, the use of fish sounds for aquaculture management and wild population protection has not received much attention. In this study, sound production of three members of the Sciaenidae family was monitored before and during spawning in aquaculture facilities. The species examined include the meagre Argyrosomus regius, the shi dum Umbrina cirrosa and red drum Sciaenops ocellatus. Red drum reproduces spontaneously in captivity, whereas shi drum and meagre...
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The use of sound in social interactions has been documented in several species of sculpin and may be used to convey information concerning species identity, intent, or fitness. Sound production may be a particularly important mode of communication in sculpin due to their nocturnal behavior and construction of nests in rock cavities where the efficacy of visual cues may be diminished. In this study, we describe acoustic signals produced during conspecific behavioral interactions in Cottus carolin...
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Technological advances have proliferated in several sectors by developing additional capabilities in the field of systems engineering. These improvements enabled the deployment of new and smart products. Today, wireless body area networks (WBAN) are commonly used to collect humans’ information, hence this evolution exposes wireless systems to new security threats. Recently, the interest by cyber-criminals in this information has increased. Many of these wireless devices are equipped with passive...
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#1Timothy J. Rowell (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 2
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#1Beatriz P. Pereira (University of the Algarve)H-Index: 1
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Background: Many fish taxa produce sound in voluntary and in disturbance contexts but information on the full acoustic repertoire is lacking for most species. Yet, this knowledge is critical to enable monitoring fish populations in nature through acoustic monitoring. Methods: In this study we characterized the sounds emitted during disturbance and voluntary contexts by juvenile and adult meagre, Argyrosomus regius, in laboratory conditions. Breeding sounds produced by captive adults were also co...
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Abstract Sound communication is affected by ambient temperature in ectothermic animals including fishes. The present study examines the effects of temperature on acoustic signaling in a fish species possessing two different sound-generating mechanisms. The Amazonian Pictus catfish Pimelodus pictus produces low-frequency harmonic sounds (swimbladder drumming muscles) and high-frequency stridulation sounds (rubbing pectoral fin spines in the pectoral girdle). Sounds of 15 juveniles were recorded w...
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ABSTRACTPassive acoustic recordings were made at two sites over a four-month period in eelgrass beds in a shallow estuary (Shinnecock Bay, New York, USA). Recordings were dominated by mating calls of striped cusk eels (Ophidion marginatum) at one site, and oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau) mating calls at the other. Cusk eel call characteristics (frequency and pulse period) varied significantly with time and water temperature. Fundamental frequency of toadfish calls decreased over the recording peri...
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#1Manuel VieiraH-Index: 1
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Many species rely on acoustic communication to fulfil several functions such as advertisement and mediation of social interactions (e.g., agonistic, mating). Therefore, fish calls can be an important source of information, e.g., to recognize reproductive periods or to assess fish welfare, and should be considered a potential non-intrusive tool in aquaculture management. Assessing fish acoustic activity, however, often requires long sound recordings. To analyse these long recordings automatic met...
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#1Friedrich Ladich (University of Vienna)H-Index: 35
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#1Agnieszka Monczak (University of South Carolina Beaufort)H-Index: 2
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In the Southeast USA, major contributors to estuarine soundscapes are the courtship calls produced by fish species belonging to the family Sciaenidae. Long-term monitoring of sciaenid courtship sounds may be valuable in understanding reproductive phenology, but this approach produces massive acoustic datasets. With this in mind, we designed a feature-based, signal detector for sciaenid fish calls and tested the efficacy of this detector against manually reviewed data. Acoustic recorders were dep...
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