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References45
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2017in Fungal Biology 2.70
You Li3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UF: University of Florida),
Craig Bateman9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UF: University of Florida)
+ 4 AuthorsJiri Hulcr25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UF: University of Florida)
Abstract The ambrosia fungus Flavodon ambrosius is the primary nutritional mutualist of ambrosia beetles Ambrosiodmus and Ambrosiophilus in North America. F. ambrosius is the only known ambrosial basidiomycete, unique in its efficient lignocellulose degradation. F. ambrosius is associated with both native American beetle species and species introduced from Asia. It remains unknown whether F. ambrosius is strictly a North American fungus, or whether it is also associated with these ambrosia beetl...
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Mycoscience 1.38
Yu-Ting Lin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NCHU: National Chung Hsing University),
Hsin‐Hui Shih2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 3 AuthorsChi-Yu Chen4
Estimated H-index: 4
(NCHU: National Chung Hsing University)
Abstract Ambrosiella species in the latest definition are tightly associated with ambrosia beetles in genera Anisandrus , Cnestus , and Xylosandrus within the tribe Xyleborini characterized by a mesothoracic mycangium. Eccoptopterus and Hadrodemius are another two xyleborine genera possessing mesothoracic mycangium, but their symbiotic fungi are unknown. A survey of Ambrosiella s.s. in Taiwan revealed five species, including one new species, A . catenulata , and indicated that members of Eccopto...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Florida Entomologist 0.97
Jiri Hulcr25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UF: University of Florida),
Adam Black4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 2 AuthorsHou-Feng Li10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NCHU: National Chung Hsing University)
Abstract Ambrosia beetles frequently invade non-native regions but are typically of no concern because most species live in dead trees and culture nonpathogenic symbiotic fungal gardens. Recently, however, several ambrosia beetle—fungus complexes have invaded non-native regions and killed large numbers of host trees. Such tree-killing invasions have occurred unexpectedly, and the mechanism of the ecological switch from dead trees to live trees has been left unexplained, or termed an “evolutionar...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Fungal Ecology 3.99
Craig Bateman9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UF: University of Florida),
Yin-Tse Huang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UF: University of Florida)
+ 3 AuthorsJiri Hulcr25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UF: University of Florida)
Abstract Ambrosia beetles and fungi represent an interesting and economically important symbiosis, but the vast majority of ambrosia fungi remain unexplored, hindering research, management of pathogens, and mitigation of invasive species. Beetles in the subtribe Premnobiini are one example of an entire beetle lineage whose fungal symbionts have never been studied. Here, we identify one dominant fungal symbiont of Premnobius cavipennis by using fungus culturing, community sequencing, microtome se...
Published on Jan 31, 2017in Annual Review of Entomology 11.80
Jiri Hulcr25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
Lukasz L. Stelinski36
Estimated H-index: 36
The ambrosia beetle–fungus farming symbiosis is more heterogeneous than previously thought. There is not one but many ambrosia symbioses. Beetle-fungus specificity is clade dependent and ranges from strict to promiscuous. Each new origin has evolved a new mycangium. The most common relationship with host trees is colonization of freshly dead tissues, but there are also parasites of living trees, vectors of pathogenic fungi, and beetles living in rotten trees with a wood-decay symbiont. Most of t...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Environmental Entomology 1.45
Craig Bateman9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UF: University of Florida),
Martin Šigut4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Ostrava)
+ 2 AuthorsJiri Hulcr25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UF: University of Florida)
Studies of symbioses have traditionally focused on explaining one-to-one interactions between organisms. In reality, symbioses are often much more dynamic. They can involve many interacting members, and change depending on context. In studies of the ambrosia symbiosis—the mutualism between wood borer beetles and fungi—two variables have introduced uncertainty when explaining interactions: imprecise symbiont identification, and disregard for anatomical complexity of the insects. The black twig bo...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Fungal Biology 2.70
Chase G. Mayers2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Iowa State University),
Douglas McNew8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Iowa State University)
+ 5 AuthorsSharon E. Reed7
Estimated H-index: 7
(MU: University of Missouri)
The genus Ambrosiella accommodates species of Ceratocystidaceae (Microascales) that are obligate, mutualistic symbionts of ambrosia beetles, but the genus appears to be polyphyletic and more diverse than previously recognized. In addition to Ambrosiella xylebori, Ambrosiella hartigii, Ambrosiella beaveri, and Ambrosiella roeperi, three new species of Ambrosiella are described from the ambrosia beetle tribe Xyleborini: Ambrosiella nakashimae sp. nov. from Xylosandrus amputatus, Ambrosiella batrae...
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Phytopathology 3.26
Leonardo S. S. Oliveira4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UFV: Universidade Federal de Viçosa),
Thomas C. Harrington40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Iowa State University)
+ 4 AuthorsAcelino Couto Alfenas30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UFV: Universidade Federal de Viçosa)
Ceratocystis wilt is among the most important diseases on mango (Mangifera indica) in Brazil, Oman, and Pakistan. The causal agent was originally identified in Brazil as Ceratocystis fimbriata, which is considered by some as a complex of many cryptic species, and four new species on mango trees were distinguished from C. fimbriata based on variation in internal transcribed spacer sequences. In the present study, phylogenetic analyses using DNA sequences of mating type genes, TEF-1α, and β-tubuli...
Published on Jul 2, 2015in PLOS ONE 2.78
Christopher M. Ranger17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center),
Peter B. Schultz14
Estimated H-index: 14
(VT: Virginia Tech)
+ 2 AuthorsMichael E. Reding16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center)
Exotic Xylosandrus spp. ambrosia beetles established in non-native habitats have been associated with sudden and extensive attacks on a diverse range of living trees, but factors driving their shift from dying/dead hosts to living and healthy ones are not well understood. We sought to characterize the role of host physiological condition on preference and colonization by two invaders, Xylosandrus germanus and Xylosandrus crassiusculus. When given free-choice under field conditions among flooded ...
Cited By3
Newest
Published on Jan 16, 2019
James Skelton7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UF: University of Florida),
Andrew J. Johnson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UF: University of Florida)
+ 3 AuthorsJiri Hulcr25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UF: University of Florida)
Thousands of species of ambrosia beetles excavate tunnels in wood to farm fungi. They maintain associations with particular lineages of fungi, but the phylogenetic extent and mechanisms of fidelity are unknown. We test the hypothesis that selectivity of their mycangium enforces fidelity at coarse phylogenetic scales, while permitting promiscuity among closely related fungal mutualists. We confirm a single evolutionary origin of the Xylosandrus complex—a group of several xyleborine genera that fa...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Fungal Ecology 3.99
Luisa F. Cruz3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UF: University of Florida),
S.A. Rocio1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Chapingo Autonomous University)
+ 3 AuthorsDaniel Carrillo15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UF: University of Florida)
Abstract Survival of ambrosia beetles relies on obligate nutritional relationships with fungal symbionts that are cultivated in tunnels excavated in the sapwood of their host trees. The dynamics of fungal associates, along with the developmental biology, and gallery construction of the ambrosia beetle Xyleborus bispinatus were elaborated. One generation of this ambrosia beetle was reared in an artificial medium containing avocado sawdust. The developmental time from egg to adult ranged from 22 t...
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Journal of Insect Science 1.45
You Li3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UF: University of Florida),
Yong‐Ying Ruan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(SZPT: Shenzhen Polytechnic)
+ 5 AuthorsJiri Hulcr25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UF: University of Florida)