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A 3D anatomical atlas of appendage musculature in the chelicerate arthropod Limulus polyphemus

Published on Feb 14, 2018in PLOS ONE2.78
· DOI :10.1371/journal.pone.0191400
Russell D. C. Bicknell5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UNE: University of New England (Australia)),
Ada J. Klinkhamer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UNE: University of New England (Australia))
+ 2 AuthorsJohn R. Paterson23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UNE: University of New England (Australia))
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Abstract
Limulus polyphemus, an archetypal chelicerate taxon, has interested both biological and paleontological researchers due to its unique suite of anatomical features and as a useful modern analogue for fossil arthropod groups. To assist the study and documentation of this iconic taxon, we present a 3D atlas on the appendage musculature, with specific focus on the muscles of the cephalothoracic appendages. As L. polyphemus appendage musculature has been the focus of extensive study, depicting the muscles in 3D will facilitate a more complete understanding thereof for future researchers. A large museum specimen was CT scanned to illustrate the major exoskeletal features of L. polyphemus. Micro-CT scans of iodine-stained appendages from fresh, non-museum specimens were digitally dissected to interactively depict appendage sections and muscles. This study has revealed the presence of two new muscles: one within the pushing leg, located dorsally relative to all other patella muscles, and the other within the male pedipalp, located in the modified tibiotarsus. This atlas increases accessibility to important internal and external morphological features of L. polyphemus and reduces the need for destructive fresh tissue dissection of specimens. Scanning, digitally dissecting, and documenting taxa in 3D is a pivotal step towards creating permanent digital records of life on Earth.
  • References (57)
  • Citations (7)
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References57
Newest
Published on May 1, 2017in Arthropod Structure & Development1.84
Jason A. Dunlop10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Museum für Naturkunde),
James C. Lamsdell13
Estimated H-index: 13
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
Abstract Patterns of segmentation and tagmosis are reviewed for Chelicerata. Depending on the outgroup, chelicerate origins are either among taxa with an anterior tagma of six somites, or taxa in which the appendages of somite I became increasingly raptorial. All Chelicerata have appendage I as a chelate or clasp-knife chelicera. The basic trend has obviously been to consolidate food-gathering and walking limbs as a prosoma and respiratory appendages on the opisthosoma. However, the boundary of ...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Arthropod Structure & Development1.84
Axelle Zacaï2
Estimated H-index: 2
(École normale supérieure de Lyon),
Jean Vannier30
Estimated H-index: 30
(École normale supérieure de Lyon),
Rudy Lerosey-Aubril12
Estimated H-index: 12
(École normale supérieure de Lyon)
The feeding ecology of the 505-million-year-old arthropod Sidneyia inexpectans from the middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) Burgess Shale fauna (British Columbia, Canada) is revealed by three lines of evidence: the structure of its digestive system, the fossilized contents of its gut and the functional anatomy of its appendages. The digestive tract of Sidneyia is straight, tubular and relatively narrow in the trunk region. It is enlarged into a pear-shaped area in the cephalic region and stretch...
José C. Xavier23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
A. Louise Allcock15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Marine Science Institute)
+ 9 AuthorsErica A. G. Vidal15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UFPR: Federal University of Paraná)
Cephalopods (Mollusca: Cephalopoda) play an important role as keystone invertebrates in various marine ecosystems, as well as being a valuable fisheries resource. At the World Malacological Congress, held 21–28 July 2013 in Ponta Delgada, Azores, Portugal, a number of cephalopod experts convened to honour the contribution of the late Malcolm R. Clarke, FRS (1930– 2013) to cephalopod research. Endorsed by the Cephalopod International Advisory Council (CIAC), the meeting discussed some of the majo...
Published on Feb 23, 2015in PLOS ONE2.78
Alana C. Sharp2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Monash University, Clayton campus),
Peter Trusler11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Monash University, Clayton campus)
Wombats are unique among marsupials in having one pair of upper incisors, and hypsodont molars for processing tough, abrasive vegetation. Of the three extant species, the most abundant, the common wombat (Vombatus ursinus), has had the least attention in terms of masticatory muscle morphology, and has never been thoroughly described. Using MRI and digital dissection to compliment traditional gross dissections, the major jaw adductor muscles, the masseter, temporalis and pterygoids, were describe...
Published on Feb 15, 2015in The Journal of Comparative Neurology3.24
Veit Grabe7
Estimated H-index: 7
(MPG: Max Planck Society),
Antonia Strutz7
Estimated H-index: 7
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
+ 2 AuthorsSilke Sachse20
Estimated H-index: 20
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
As a model for primary olfactory perception, the antennal lobe (AL) of Drosophila melanogaster is among the most thoroughly investigated and well-understood neuronal structures. Most studies investigating the functional properties and neuronal wiring of the AL are conducted in vivo, although so far the AL morphology has been mainly analyzed in vitro. Identifying the morphological subunits of the AL—the olfactory glomeruli—is usually done using in vitro AL atlases. However, the dissection and fix...
Published on May 16, 2014in PLOS ONE2.78
Rosa Fernández16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Harvard University),
Sebastian Kvist12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Harvard University)
+ 2 AuthorsAlexander Ziegler15
Estimated H-index: 15
In spite of the high relevance of lumbricid earthworms (‘Oligochaeta’: Lumbricidae) for soil structure and functioning, the taxonomy of this group of terrestrial invertebrates remains in a quasi-chaotic state. Earthworm taxonomy traditionally relies on the interpretation of external and internal morphological characters, but the acquisition of these data is often hampered by tedious dissections or restricted access to valuable and rare museum specimens. The present state of affairs, in conjuncti...
Published on May 1, 2014in Journal of Experimental Zoology1.72
Paul M. Gignac10
Estimated H-index: 10
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Nathan J. Kley12
Estimated H-index: 12
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
The now widespread use of non-destructive X-ray computed tomography (CT) and micro-CT (µCT) has greatly augmented our ability to comprehensively detail and quantify the internal hard-tissue anatomy of vertebrates. However, the utility of X-ray imaging for gaining similar insights into vertebrate soft-tissue anatomy has yet to be fully realized due to the naturally low X-ray absorption of non-mineralized tissues. In this study, we show how a wide diversity of soft-tissue structures within the ver...
Published on May 1, 2014in PeerJ2.35
Michelle R. Quayle8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Monash University, Clayton campus),
David G. Barnes29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Monash University, Clayton campus)
+ 1 AuthorsColin R. McHenry14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Monash University, Clayton campus)
The investigation of form-function relationships requires a detailed understanding of anatomical systems. Here we document the 3-dimensional morphology of the cranial musculoskeletal anatomy in the Australian Laughing Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae, with a focus upon the geometry and attachments of the jaw muscles in this species. The head of a deceased specimen was CT scanned, and an accurate 3D representation of the skull and jaw muscles was generated through manual segmentation of the CT scan...
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Journal of Anatomy2.64
Stephan Lautenschlager24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Jen A. Bright12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Emily J. Rayfield30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UoB: University of Bristol)
Gross dissection has a long history as a tool for the study of human or animal soft-and hard-tissue anatomy. However, apart from being a time-consuming and invasive method, dissection is often unsuitable for very small specimens and often cannot capture spatial relationships of the individual soft-tissue structures. The handful of comprehensive studies on avian anatomy using traditional dissection techniques focus nearly exclusively on domestic birds, whereas raptorial birds, and in particular t...
Published on Mar 1, 2014in Palaeontologische Zeitschrift1.27
Stephan Lautenschlager24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UoB: University of Bristol)
During the last decade, three-dimensional, digital models have become increasingly important in geosciences and in particular in palaeontological research. Although significant advances in hard- and software technology have facilitated the acquisition and creation of such models, the presentation of three-dimensional data is still greatly handicapped by the traditionally two-dimensional means of publication. The ability to integrate three-dimensional (3D) models, which can be interactively manip...
Cited By7
Newest
Published on Jan 8, 2019in BMC Evolutionary Biology3.04
James C. Lamsdell13
Estimated H-index: 13
(WVU: West Virginia University),
Gerald O. Gunderson4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Ronald C. Meyer2
Estimated H-index: 2
Background Chasmataspidids are a rare group of chelicerate arthropods known from 12 species assigned to ten genera, with a geologic range extending from the Ordovician to the Devonian. The Late Ordovician (Richmondian) fauna of the Big Hill Lagerstatte includes a new species of chasmataspidid represented by 55 specimens. This taxon is only the second chasmataspidid described from the Ordovician and preserves morphological details unknown from any of the previously described species.
Published on 2019in Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society2.91
Russell D. C. Bicknell5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UNE: University of New England (Australia)),
Lisa Amati , Javier Ortega-Hernández12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Harvard University)
Published on Aug 1, 2019
Russell D. C. Bicknell5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UNE: University of New England (Australia)),
Tom Brougham2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UNE: University of New England (Australia))
+ 3 AuthorsNicolás E. Campione (UNE: University of New England (Australia))
Xiphosurida—crown group horseshoe crabs—are a group of morphologically conservative marine chelicerates (at least since the Jurassic). They represent an idealised example of evolutionary stasis. Unfortunately, body fossils of horseshoe crabs seldom preserve appendages and their associated features; thus, an important aspect of their morphology is absent in explorations of their conservative Bauplan. As such, fossil horseshoe crab appendages are rarely considered within a comparative framework: p...
Russell D. C. Bicknell5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Stephen Pates4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Oxford)
Xiphosurids are an archetypal group of chelicerates with extensive anatomical, physiological, and paleontological documentation. Despite this research, very little information is available concerning abnormal specimens of the group. Here we vastly increase the number of documented abnormal extant xiphosurids by identifying 17 specimens showing a range of abnormalities on the appendages, cephalothorax, thoracetron, and telson. These specimens include all extant species and the first documentation...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Journal of Morphology1.56
Thomas L. Semple (ANU: Australian National University), Rod Peakall31
Estimated H-index: 31
(ANU: Australian National University),
Nikolai J. Tatarnic10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UWA: University of Western Australia)
Published on Oct 24, 2018
Russell D. C. Bicknell5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UNE: University of New England (Australia)),
Justin A. Ledogar9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UNE: University of New England (Australia))
+ 3 AuthorsJohn R. Paterson23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UNE: University of New England (Australia))
The biology of the American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, is well documented—including its dietary habits, particularly the ability to crush shell with gnathobasic walking appendages—but virtually nothing is known about the feeding biomechanics of this iconic arthropod. Limulus polyphemus is also considered the archetypal functional analogue of various extinct groups with serial gnathobasic appendages, including eurypterids, trilobites and other early arthropods, especially Sidneyia inexpe...