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Taxonomic and ecological variations of Permian-Triassic transitional bivalve communities from the littoral clastic facies in southwestern China

Published on Apr 1, 2019in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
· DOI :10.1016/j.palaeo.2018.02.027
Ting Song2
Estimated H-index: 2
(China University of Geosciences),
Jinnan Tong26
Estimated H-index: 26
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 2 AuthorsYunfei Huang6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Yangtze University)
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Abstract
Abstract Immediately after the latest Permian mass extinction, bivalve faunas colonized the Permian-Triassic Transitional Beds (PTTB), especially in littoral clastic facies of South China. The Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) transitional bivalve fauna is composed of holdovers, long-term survivors and newly evolved taxa, and characterized by moderate diversity and high dominance. However, the taxonomy and ecology of this bivalve fauna of littoral clastic facies have not been well understood, especially in comparison with offshore marine records. This paper presents a study on a P-Tr transitional bivalve fauna from five sections of littoral clastic facies in southwestern China, and as such it contributes to a better knowledge of the ecological processes of benthic communities during the P-Tr transition. In total, 20 species in 13 genera of bivalves are identified from the PTTB in the lower part of the Kayitou Formation and the basal part of the Feixianguan Formation of the five sections. Cluster analysis suggests that the transitional bivalve fauna could be further divided into two successive communities (early and late communities), and each is composed of five assemblages. Promyalina – Neoschizodus community (early community) is characterized by presence of holdover taxa, high taxonomic diversity and evenness, and more abundant shallow infaunal suspension feeders. In Pteria community (late community), taxonomic diversity and evenness are much lower, and stationary epifaunal suspension feeders boost at the expense of shallow infaunal suspension feeders compared with the Promyalina – Neoschizodus community. Furthermore, the Promyalina – Neoschizodus community shows a clear spatial variation along environmental gradient from brackish lagoon to shallow marine settings, while the Pteria community is more uniform and homogeneous laterally. The Promyalina – Neoschizodus community in the studied region is of latest Permian age while the Pteria community should belong to the earliest Triassic. Consequently, a significant taxonomical and ecological turnover of bivalve communities occurred between the Promyalina – Neoschizodus community and the Pteria community during the extinction interval in southwestern China.
  • References (53)
  • Citations (2)
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References53
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Yang Zhang9
Estimated H-index: 9
(China University of Geosciences),
Guang Rong Shi31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Deakin University)
+ 4 AuthorsYong Lei2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract A quantitative investigation of the ecological changes of shallow-marine benthos was undertaken at the Permian–Triassic boundary section at Zhongzhai, South China. The studied fossil material primarily included brachiopods and bivalves owing to their abundance throughout the section, but other subordinate taxonomic groups including ostracods and microgastropods were also integrated for discussion. Overall, a succession of three benthonic paleocommunities was recognized representing thre...
Published on Oct 3, 2017in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology2.31
William J. Foster7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Texas at Austin),
Silvia Danise11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UGA: University of Georgia),
Richard J. Twitchett35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Natural History Museum)
Understanding how the marine biosphere recovered from the late Permian mass extinction event is a major evolutionary question. The quality of the global fossil record of this interval is, however, somewhat poor due to preservational, collection and sampling biases. Here we report a new earliest Induan (Hindeodus parvus Zone) marine assemblage from the Deltadalen Member of the Vikinghogda Formation, central Spitsbergen, which fills a critical gap in knowledge. The fully silicified fossils compris...
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Daoliang Chu9
Estimated H-index: 9
(China University of Geosciences),
Jinnan Tong26
Estimated H-index: 26
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 2 AuthorsYunfei Huang6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Yangtze University)
Abstract Correlation between marine and continental Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) strata is crucial for full understanding of the nature of this global extinction event, but it has proved difficult to achieve. Here, we show that two sections in South China and North China record similar mixed continental-marine biota in the post-extinction stratigraphic interval, including conchostracans, plants, insects, marine bivalves and lingulid brachiopods. In addition, the continental P-Tr mass extinction was r...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Global and Planetary Change4.10
Ying Cui8
Estimated H-index: 8
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Antoine Bercovici2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Smithsonian Institution)
+ 4 AuthorsVivi Vajda-Santivanez21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Lund University)
Stable isotopes of inorganic and organic carbon are commonly used in chemostratigraphy to correlate marine and terrestrial sedimentary sequences based on the assumption that the carbon isotopic signature of the exogenic carbon pool dominates other sources of variability. Here, sediment samples from four Permian–Triassic boundary (PTB) sections of western Guizhou and eastern Yunnan provinces in South China, representing a terrestrial to marine transitional setting, were analyzed for δ13C of organ...
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Global and Planetary Change4.10
Daoliang Chu9
Estimated H-index: 9
(China University of Geosciences),
Jianxin Yu12
Estimated H-index: 12
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 5 AuthorsLi Tian13
Estimated H-index: 13
(China University of Geosciences)
Abstract The Permian-Triassic boundary marks the greatest mass extinction during the Phanerozoic, which was coupled with major global environmental changes, and is known especially from well-preserved marine fossil records and continuous carbonate deposits. However, the placement of the Permian-Triassic boundary in terrestrial sections and accurate correlation with the marine strata are difficult due to the absence of the key marine index fossils in terrestrial-marine siliciclastic settings. Her...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Paleobiology2.35
Elizabeth Petsios6
Estimated H-index: 6
(SC: University of Southern California),
David J. Bottjer57
Estimated H-index: 57
(SC: University of Southern California)
Abstract. The end-Permian mass extinction, the largest extinction of the Phanerozoic, led to a severe reduction in both taxonomic richness and ecological complexity of marine communities, eventually culminating in a dramatic ecological restructuring of communities. During the Early Triassic recovery interval, disaster taxa proliferated and numerically dominated many marine benthic invertebrate assemblages. These disaster taxa include the bivalve genera Claraia, Unionites, Eumorphotis, and Promya...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Hua Zhang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Changqun Cao21
Estimated H-index: 21
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 6 AuthorsShu-zhong Shen31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The end-Permian mass extinction reflects the most severe life crisis during the Phanerozoic and was associated with major global environmental changes. However, the consistency of the time and pattern of the terrestrial and marine extinctions remains controversial. In this paper, we presented detailed analyses of the high-resolution biostratigraphical and geochemical data from terrestrial sections in South China. Our analyses show that the transitional Kayitou Formation actually recorde...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Earth-Science Reviews9.53
Jianxin Yu12
Estimated H-index: 12
(China University of Geosciences),
Jean Broutin20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Paris)
+ 4 AuthorsQisheng Huang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(China University of Geosciences)
Abstract This paper reviews critically the Permian–Triassic (P–Tr) fossil plants and microflora recorded in three well-studied terrestrial Permian–Triassic boundary (PTB) sections, namely Chahe, Zhejue, and Jiucaichong, and two marine–terrestrial transitional PTB sections, namely Mide and Tucheng, in western Guizhou Province and eastern Yunnan Province (WGEY), Southwest China. Distinct floral composition, abundance and diversity across the PTB allow the establishment of two terrestrial macroflor...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Lethaia1.74
Richard Hofmann12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Michael Hautmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Hugo Bucher37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UZH: University of Zurich)
Hofmann, R., Hautmann, M. & Bucher, H. 2014: Recovery dynamics of benthic marine communities from the Lower Triassic Werfen Formation, northern Italy. Lethaia, DOI: 10.1111/let.12121. The Lower Triassic Werfen Formation of northern Italy represents an important archive for Early Triassic ecosystems. Based on quantitative community analysis using species level identifications, we reconstruct the recovery of benthic ecosystems after the end-Permian mass extinction throughout this unit. The analysi...
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Palaeontology2.63
Michael Hautmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Borhan Bagherpour4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UZH: University of Zurich)
+ 6 AuthorsHugo Bucher37
Estimated H-index: 37
(UZH: University of Zurich)
Changes of community structure in response to competition usually take place on timescales that are much too short to be visible in the geological record. Here we report the notable exception of a benthic marine community in the wake of the end-Permian mass extinction, which is associated with the microbial limestone facies of the earliest Triassic of South China. The newly reported fauna is well preserved and extraordinarily rich (30 benthic macroinvertebrate species, including the new species ...
Cited By2
Newest
Published on May 1, 2019in Palaeoworld1.14
Frank Scholze4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Kazan: Kazan Federal University),
Shu-zhong Shen31
Estimated H-index: 31
(NU: Nanjing University)
+ 5 AuthorsJoerg W. Schneider8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kazan: Kazan Federal University)
Abstract Sedimentary deposits of the Permian–Triassic transition are well-exposed in numerous outcrops of South China. Depending on the palaeogeographic positions of the sections, their lithofacies vary from fully marine, shallow marine, lagoonal, lacustrine, and fluvial to alluvial. In the present study, conchostracans (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) were newly collected from the continental deposits of the Kayitou and Jialingjiang formations around the Kangdian Highland elevated by the Emeishan Basa...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Science China-earth Sciences2.26
Jinnan Tong26
Estimated H-index: 26
(China University of Geosciences),
Daoliang Chu9
Estimated H-index: 9
(China University of Geosciences)
+ 5 AuthorsYuyang Wu (China University of Geosciences)
The Triassic rocks are widespread in China, and both marine and terrestrial strata are well developed. The Triassic stratigraphic architecture of China is very complex in both spatial variation of the so-called “South Marine and North Continental”, i.e. the southern areas of China occupied mostly by marine facies while the northern China by terrestrial facies during the Triassic Period, and temporal transition of the “Lower Marine and Upper Continental”, i.e. the lower part of the Triassic Syste...