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Feeding and grazing impact by the bloom-forming euglenophyte Eutreptiella eupharyngea on marine eubacteria and cyanobacteria

Published on Mar 1, 2018in Harmful Algae 5.01
· DOI :10.1016/j.hal.2018.02.003
Yeong Du Yoo26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Kunsan National University),
Kyeong Ah Seong19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Kunsan National University)
+ 6 AuthorsBrian Palenik42
Estimated H-index: 42
(UCSD: University of California, San Diego)
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Abstract
Abstract The phototrophic euglenophyte Eutreptiella eupharyngea often causes blooms in the coastal waters of many countries, but its mode of nutrition has not been assessed. This species has previously been considered as exclusively auxotrophic. To explore whether E. eupharyngea is a mixotrophic species, the protoplasm of E. eupharyngea cells were examined using light, epifluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy after eubacteria, the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp., and diverse algal species were provided as potential prey. Furthermore, the ingestion rates of E. eupharyngea KR on eubacteria or Synechococcus sp. as a function of prey concentration were measured. In addition, grazing by natural populations of euglenophytes on natural populations of eubacteria in Masan Bay was investigated. This study is the first to report that E. eupharyngea is a mixotrophic species. Among the potential prey organisms offered, E. eupharyngea fed only on eubacteria and Synechococcus sp., and the maximum ingestion rates of these two organisms measured in the laboratory were 5.7 and 0.7 cells predator −1  h −1 , respectively. During the field experiments, the maximum ingestion rates and grazing impacts of euglenophytes, including E. eupharyngea , on natural populations of eubacteria were 11.8 cells predator −1  h −1 and 1.228 d −1 , respectively. Therefore, euglenophytes could potentially have a considerable grazing impact on marine bacterial populations.
  • References (92)
  • Citations (1)
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References92
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Harmful Algae 5.01
Yeong Du Yoo26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Kunsan National University),
Kyeong Ah Seong19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Kunsan National University)
+ 4 AuthorsHyung Seop Kim17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Kunsan National University)
Abstract Cryptophytes are ubiquitous and one of the major phototrophic components in marine plankton communities. They often cause red tides in the waters of many countries. Understanding the bloom dynamics of cryptophytes is, therefore, of great importance. A critical step in this understanding is unveiling their trophic modes. Prior to this study, several freshwater cryptophyte species and marine Cryptomonas sp. and Geminifera cryophila were revealed to be mixotrophic. The trophic mode of the ...
Published on Mar 15, 2017in Algae 2.16
Kyeong Ah Seong19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Kunsan National University),
Geumog Myung8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kunsan National University)
+ 5 AuthorsYeong Du Yoo26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Kunsan National University)
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Harmful Algae 5.01
Paul V. Zimba27
Estimated H-index: 27
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi),
I-Shuo Huang3
Estimated H-index: 3
(A&M-CC: Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi)
+ 3 AuthorsRichard E. Triemer25
Estimated H-index: 25
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Abstract Euglena sanguinea is known to produce the alkaloid toxin euglenophycin and is known to cause fish kills and inhibit mammalian tissue and microalgal culture growth. An analysis of over 30 species of euglenoids for accumulation of euglenophycin identified six additional species producing the toxin; and six of the seven E. sanguinea strains produced the toxin. A phylogenetic assessment of these species confirmed most taxa were in the Euglenaceae, whereas synthesis capability apparently has...
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Limnology and Oceanography 4.33
N. C. Millette2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UMCES: University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science),
James J. Pierson16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UMCES: University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science)
+ 1 AuthorsDiane K. Stoecker40
Estimated H-index: 40
(UMCES: University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science)
Heterocapsa rotundata is a mixotrophic dinoflagellate that can ingest picoplankton, including bacteria, and is known to form large blooms in temperate estuaries during wet winters, particularly when grazing pressure on phytoplankton is low. We hypothesized that phagotrophy gives H. rotundata an advantage over other phytoplankton species during low light conditions. We used laboratory and field experiments to investigate changes in phagotrophy by H. rotundata in response to changes in light avail...
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Marine Biology 2.13
Alfredo Pérez-Morales1
Estimated H-index: 1
(IPN: Instituto Politécnico Nacional),
Christine J. Band-Schmidt11
Estimated H-index: 11
(IPN: Instituto Politécnico Nacional),
Sergio F. Martínez-Díaz6
Estimated H-index: 6
(IPN: Instituto Politécnico Nacional)
Cochlodinium polykrikoides and Chattonella spp. are responsible for harmful algal blooms along the Mexican coasts. These microalgae have the ability to produce toxic compounds such as reactive oxygen species, brevetoxin-like compounds, nitric oxide, and free polyunsaturated fatty acids, which can be harmful to marine fauna. However, scarce information exists about the effect of these harmful phytoplankton species on potential zooplankton grazers. In this study, the effect of microalgae Cochlodin...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Journal of Phycology 2.83
Bryan Lakey1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MSU: Michigan State University),
Richard E. Triemer25
Estimated H-index: 25
(MSU: Michigan State University)
The history of euglenoids may have begun as early as ~2 bya. These early phagotrophs ate cyanobacteria, archaea, and eubacteria, and the subsequent appearance of red algae and chromalveolates provided euglenoids with additional food sources. Following the appearance of green algae, euglenoids acquired a chloroplast via a secondary endosymbiotic event with a green algal ancestor. This endosymbiosis also involved a massive transfer of nuclear-encoded genes from the symbiont nucleus to the host. Ex...
Published on Jan 3, 2017in Annual Review of Marine Science 15.22
Diane K. Stoecker40
Estimated H-index: 40
,
Per Juel Hansen43
Estimated H-index: 43
+ 1 AuthorsAditee Mitra17
Estimated H-index: 17
Mixotrophs are important components of the bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and (sometimes) zooplankton in coastal and oceanic waters. Bacterivory among the phytoplankton may be important for alleviating inorganic nutrient stress and may increase primary production in oligotrophic waters. Mixotrophic phytoflagellates and dinoflagellates are often dominant components of the plankton during seasonal stratification. Many of the microzooplankton grazers, including ciliates and Rhiz...
Published on Dec 15, 2015in Algae 2.16
Yeong Du Yoo26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Kyeong Ah Seong19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 4 AuthorsWonho Yih22
Estimated H-index: 22
Published on Aug 20, 2015in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution
Jong Im Kim10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CNU: Chungnam National University),
Eric W. Linton10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CMU: Central Michigan University),
Woongghi Shin15
Estimated H-index: 15
(CNU: Chungnam National University)
To establish taxonomy and understand phylogenetic relationships among strains and species of the photosynthetic euglenoids, we performed phylogenetic analyses based on a four gene sequence dataset (nr SSU and LSU rDNA, and pt SSU and LSU rDNA) from 343 taxa (including three outgroup). The phylogenetic tree based on the combined dataset was split into two major clades: Euglenaceae and Phacaceae. The family Euglenaceae was a well-supported monophyletic group containing eight genera (Colacium, Cryp...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Harmful Algae 5.01
Mário U. G. Barros1
Estimated H-index: 1
(AU: Auburn University),
Alan E. Wilson22
Estimated H-index: 22
(AU: Auburn University)
+ 4 AuthorsJose Capelo-Neto2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UFC: Federal University of Ceará)
Abstract Cyanobacteria are known to produce a wide variety of bioactive, toxic secondary metabolites generally described as hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, cytotoxins, or dermatoxins. In Brazil, the regular monitoring of cyanobacterial toxins has intensified after the death of 65 patients in a hemodialysis clinic in Caruaru in the state of Pernambuco due to microcystin exposure. The primary objective of this study was to use multivariate statistics that incorporated environmental parameters (both bio...
Published on Dec 26, 2018in bioRxiv
Stella F. Uiterwaal2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln),
Ian T. Lagerstrom (NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)+ 1 AuthorsJohn P. DeLong13
Estimated H-index: 13
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)
Functional responses - the relationships between consumer foraging rate and resource (prey) density - provide key insights into consumer-resource interactions and predation mechanics while also being a major contributor to population dynamics and food web structure. We present a global database of standardized functional response parameters extracted from the published literature. We refit the functional responses with a Type II model using standardized methods and report the fitted parameters a...