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Sleep quantity and quality during consecutive day heat training with the inclusion of cold-water immersion recovery

Published on May 1, 2018in Journal of Thermal Biology1.90
· DOI :10.1016/j.jtherbio.2018.03.012
Melissa Skein7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CSU: Charles Sturt University),
Georgia Wingfield2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CSU: Charles Sturt University)
+ 2 AuthorsGeoffrey M. Minett12
Estimated H-index: 12
(QUT: Queensland University of Technology)
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Abstract
Abstract Exercise in the heat is a common occurrence among athletes and often is intentional in order to gain heat acclimation benefits, however, little is known about how such training may affect sleep. Therefore, this study investigated five days of training in the heat of varying intensity and duration and inclusion of cold-water immersion (CWI) recovery on sleep quantity and quality. Thirty recreationally-trained male participants completed five days of heat training (HT) and were randomised into three interventions including (i) 90 min cycling at 40% power at maximal aerobic capacity (P max ) with 15 min passive recovery (90HT); (ii) 90 min cycling at 40% P max with 15 min CWI recovery (90CWI); or (iii) 30 min cycling alternating between 40% and 70% P max , with 15 min passive recovery (30HT). Sleep quality and quantity were assessed using Actigraphy and sleep diaries during five baseline nights (BASE) and five nights of HT which included subjective sleep quality and objective assessments of sleep quantity and quality. Total time asleep and perceived sleep quality were reduced, while awake duration and wake after sleep onset (WASO) were increased (p = 0.001–0.01) during HT compared to BASE. Latency was shorter for 30HT compared to 90HT during HT (p = 0.02), however, no differences between interventions for all other sleep variables (p > 0.05). The reduction in total sleep time due to increases in average wake duration during HT may be due to the unaccustomed increased in training frequency. Of note, reducing training in the heat duration per day improved sleep latency and sleep quality with no effect on total sleep time, while the addition of CWI has minimal effect on sleep quality or quantity.
  • References (38)
  • Citations (2)
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References38
Newest
Published on Jul 18, 2017in Journal of Sports Sciences2.81
Sophie C. Killer6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Lboro: Loughborough University),
Ida S. Svendsen8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Lboro: Loughborough University)
+ 1 AuthorsMichael Gleeson52
Estimated H-index: 52
(Lboro: Loughborough University)
ABSTRACTFew studies have investigated the effects of exercise training on sleep physiology in well-trained athletes. We investigated changes in sleep markers, mood state and exercise performance in well-trained cyclists undergoing short-term intensified training and carbohydrate nutritional intervention. Thirteen highly-trained male cyclists (age: 25 ± 6y, O2max: 72 ± 5 ml/kg/min) participated in two 9-day periods of intensified training while undergoing a high (HCHO) or moderate (CON) carbohydr...
Nathan Pitchford3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Sam Robertson13
Estimated H-index: 13
+ 3 AuthorsJonathan D. Bartlett11
Estimated H-index: 11
Purpose:To assess the effects of a change in training environment on the sleep characteristics of elite Australian Rules football (AF) players. Methods:In an observational crossover trial, 19 elite AF players had time in bed (TIB), total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), and wake after sleep onset (WASO) assessed using wristwatch activity devices and subjective sleep diaries across 8-d home and camp periods. Repeated-measures ANOVA determined mean differences in sleep, training load (sess...
Published on Jul 3, 2016in European Journal of Sport Science2.38
Sarah Kölling6
Estimated H-index: 6
(RUB: Ruhr University Bochum),
Thimo Wiewelhove7
Estimated H-index: 7
(RUB: Ruhr University Bochum)
+ 4 AuthorsMmichael Kellmann1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UQ: University of Queensland)
AbstractThis study examined the effect of microcycles in eccentric strength and high-intensity interval training (HIT) on sleep parameters and subjective ratings. Forty-two well-trained athletes (mean age 23.2 ± 2.4 years) were either assigned to the strength (n = 21; mean age 23.6 ± 2.1 years) or HIT (n = 21; mean age 22.8 ± 2.6 years) protocol. Sleep monitoring was conducted with multi-sensor actigraphy (SenseWear Armband™, Bodymedia, Pittsburg, PA, USA) and sleep log for 14 days. After a five...
Published on May 1, 2016in Journal of Thermal Biology1.90
Georgia Wingfield2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CSU: Charles Sturt University),
Rachel Gale2
Estimated H-index: 2
(AIS: Australian Institute of Sport)
+ 2 AuthorsMelissa Skein7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CSU: Charles Sturt University)
Abstract This study examined the effect of exercise intensity and duration during 5-day heat acclimation (HA) on cycling performance and neuromuscular responses. 20 recreationally trained males completed a ‘baseline’ trial followed by 5 consecutive days HA, and a ‘post-acclimation’ trial. Baseline and post-acclimation trials consisted of maximal voluntary contractions (MVC), a single and repeated countermovement jump protocol, 20 km cycling time trial (TT) and 5×6 s maximal sprints (SPR). Cyclin...
Published on Jan 7, 2016in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews7.75
Geoffrey M. Minett12
Estimated H-index: 12
(QUT: Queensland University of Technology),
Melissa Skein7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CSU: Charles Sturt University)
+ 4 AuthorsJoseph T. Costello17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Portsmouth)
Published on Jan 2, 2016in Chronobiology International2.56
Sarah Kölling6
Estimated H-index: 6
(RUB: Ruhr University Bochum),
Jürgen M. Steinacker28
Estimated H-index: 28
+ 3 AuthorsMichael Kellmann22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UQ: University of Queensland)
ABSTRACTRecovery is essential for high athletic performance, and therefore especially sleep has been identified as a crucial source for physical and psychological well-being. However, due to early-morning trainings, which are general practice in many sports, athletes are likely to experience sleep restrictions. Therefore, this study investigated the sleep–wake patterns of 55 junior national rowers (17.7 ± 0.6 years) via sleep logs and actigraphy during a four-week training camp. Recovery and str...
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports3.63
Sebastien Racinais31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Qatar Airways),
Juan-Manuel Alonso16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Qatar Airways)
+ 14 AuthorsNigel Mitchell3
Estimated H-index: 3
Exercising in the heat induces thermoregulatory and other physiological strain that can lead to impairments in endurance exercise capacity. The purpose of this consensus statement is to provide up-to-date recommendations to optimize performance during sporting activities undertaken in hot ambient conditions. The most important intervention one can adopt to reduce physiological strain and optimize performance is to heat acclimatize. Heat acclimatization should comprise repeated exercise-heat expo...
Published on Feb 17, 2015in European Journal of Sport Science2.38
Michele Lastella8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Central Queensland University),
Gregory D. Roach27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Central Queensland University)
+ 1 AuthorsCharli Sargent20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Central Queensland University)
AbstractSleep is an essential component for athlete recovery due to its physiological and psychological restorative effects, yet few studies have explored the habitual sleep/wake behaviour of elite athletes. The aims of the present study were to investigate the habitual sleep/wake behaviour of elite athletes, and to compare the differences in sleep between athletes from individual and team sports. A total of 124 (104 male, 20 female) elite athletes (mean ± s: age 22.2 ± 3.0 years) from five indi...
Published on Feb 1, 2015in Sports Medicine7.58
Hugh Fullagar10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Saarland University),
Sabrina Skorski12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Saarland University)
+ 3 AuthorsTim Meyer26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Saarland University)
Although its true function remains unclear, sleep is considered critical to human physiological and cognitive function. Equally, since sleep loss is a common occurrence prior to competition in athletes, this could significantly impact upon their athletic performance. Much of the previous research has reported that exercise performance is negatively affected following sleep loss; however, conflicting findings mean that the extent, influence, and mechanisms of sleep loss affecting exercise perform...
Published on Sep 1, 2014in Open access journal of sports medicine
João Brito17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Sebastien Racinais31
Estimated H-index: 31
,
George P. Nassis21
Estimated H-index: 21
The second Summer Youth Olympic Games will take place August 16–28, 2014 in Nanjing, People’s Republic of China during the peak of the summer. Nanjing has been reported as one of the hottest cities in the People’s Republic of China, with temperatures reaching as high as 40°C. There is limited clinical evidence of the real risks that youth athletes face when training and competing in the heat, but some recommendations can be made. The estimated average wet bulb globe temperature for Nanjing in Au...
Cited By2
Newest
Published on Sep 19, 2019
Ashley Willmott5
Estimated H-index: 5
(ARU: Anglia Ruskin University),
Mark Hayes5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Brighton)
+ 2 AuthorsNeil S. Maxwell20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Brighton)
Published on Sep 3, 2019
Lorenz S. Kissling (University of Otago), Ashley P. Akerman (University of Otago), James D. Cotter34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Otago)
ABSTRACTTokyo 2020 will likely be the most heat stressful Olympics to date, so preparation to mitigate the effects of humid heat will be essential for performance in several of the 33 sports. One k...
Published on Jul 3, 2019in European Journal of Sport Science2.38
Wafa Douzi1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Poitiers),
Olivier Dupuy11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Poitiers)
+ 3 AuthorsBenoit Dugué24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Poitiers)
AbstractExercise training during evening may disturb sleep patterns and hinder recovery process. The present study aimed to examine the effect of whole body cryotherapy (WBC) exposure after training in the evening on sleep quality and night heart rate variability (HRV). A total of 22 physically active men were randomized to undergo either WBC (3-min at −40°C, wind speed of 2.3 m s−1) or passive recovery (control) following an evening training consisting of 25 min of continuous running at 65% of ...
Published on Nov 18, 2018in Nutrients4.17
Angelos Vlahoyiannis1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
George Aphamis2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 3 AuthorsChristoforos D. Giannaki12
Estimated H-index: 12
The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of the glycemic index of post-exercise meals on sleep quality and quantity, and assess whether those changes could affect the next day’s exercise performance. Following a baseline/familiarization phase, 10 recreationally trained male volunteers (23.2 ± 1.8 years) underwent two double-blinded, randomized, counterbalanced crossover trials. In both trials, participants performed sprint interval training (SIT) in the evening. Post-exercise, ...