Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!

On average, a professional rugby union player is more likely than not to sustain a concussion after 25 matches

Published on Mar 12, 2018in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
· DOI :10.1136/bjsports-2017-098417
James Rafferty3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Swansea University),
Craig Ranson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(English Institute of Sport)
+ 4 AuthorsIsabel S Moore2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Cardiff Metropolitan University)
Cite
Abstract
Objectives To investigate concussion injury rates, the likelihood of sustaining concussion relative to the number of rugby union matches and the risk of subsequent injury following concussion. Methods A four-season (2012/2013–2015/2016) prospective cohort study of injuries in professional level (club and international) rugby union. Incidence (injuries/1000 player-match-hours), severity (days lost per injury) and number of professional matches conferring a large risk of concussion were determined. The risk of injury following concussion was assessed using a survival model. Results Concussion incidence increased from 7.9 (95% CI 5.1 to 11.7) to 21.5 injuries/1000 player-match-hours (95% CI 16.4 to 27.6) over the four seasons for combined club and international rugby union. Concussion severity was unchanged over time (median: 9 days). Players were at a greater risk of sustaining a concussion than not after an exposure of 25 matches (95% CI 19 to 32). Injury risk (any injury) was 38% greater (HR 1.38; 95% CI 1.21 to 1.56) following concussion than after a non-concussive injury. Injuries to the head and neck (HR 1.34; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.70), upper limb (HR 1.59; 95% CI 1.19 to 2.12), pelvic region (HR 2.07; 95% CI 1.18 to 3.65) and the lower limb (HR 1.60; 95% CI 1.21 to 2.10) were more likely following concussion than after a non-concussive injury. Conclusion Concussion incidence increased, while severity remained unchanged, during the 4 years of this study. Playing more than 25 matches in the 2015/2016 season meant that sustaining concussion was more likely than not sustaining concussion. The 38% greater injury risk after concussive injury (compared with non-concussive injury) suggests return to play protocols warrant investigation.
  • References (27)
  • Citations (3)
Cite
References27
Newest
Published on Nov 2, 2018in Journal of Sports Sciences 2.81
Craig Ranson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(English Institute of Sport),
Jonathan George1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsIsabel S. Moore8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Cardiff Metropolitan University)
ABSTRACTArtificial rugby union playing surface installation is increasing. This prospective cohort study aimed to examine the effect of playing surface on match injury types within 157 players of two UK professional rugby union clubs playing 209 matches (96 on artificial surfaces and 113 on grass) over three seasons. There was no difference in overall injury risk between the two playing surfaces with injury incidence on artificial 80.2 (CI 69.9–91.7) and on grass 81.9 per 1000 match-hours (CI 72...
Published on Sep 1, 2018in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
Isabel S Moore2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Cardiff Metropolitan University),
Stephen Mount2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 1 AuthorsCraig Ranson14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Cardiff Metropolitan University)
Background When an athlete has more than one injury over a time period, it is important to determine if these are related to each other or not. The subsequent injury categorisation (SIC) model is a method designed to consider the relationship between an index injury and subsequent injury(ies). Objective The primary aim was to apply SIC to longitudinal injury data from two team sports: rugby union and cricket. The secondary aim was to determine SIC inter-rater reliability. Methods Rugby union (ti...
Published on Aug 1, 2017in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
Ross Tucker20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Martin Raftery15
Estimated H-index: 15
+ 5 AuthorsKen Quarrie2
Estimated H-index: 2
Objectives The tackle is responsible for the majority of head injuries during rugby union. In order to address head injury risk, risk factors during the tackle must first be identified. This study analysed tackle characteristics in the professional game in order to inform potential interventions. Methods 464 tackles resulting in a head injury assessment (HIA) were analysed in detail, with tackle type, direction, speed, acceleration, nature of head contact and player body position the characteris...
Published on May 1, 2017in Sports Medicine 7.58
Daniel C. Herman14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UF: University of Florida),
Debi Jones3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 7 AuthorsTerese L. Chmielewski27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UF: University of Florida)
Background Laboratory-based studies on neuromuscular control after concussion and epidemiological studies suggest that concussion may increase the risk of subsequent musculoskeletal injury.
Published on Jan 1, 2017in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
Colin W Fuller36
Estimated H-index: 36
,
Aileen Taylor10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 1 AuthorsMartin Raftery15
Estimated H-index: 15
Objective To determine the incidence, severity and nature of injuries sustained during the Rugby World Cup (RWC) 2015 together with the inciting events leading to the injuries. Design A prospective, whole population study. Population 639 international rugby players representing 20 countries. Method The study protocol followed the definitions and procedures recommended in the consensus statement for epidemiological studies in rugby union; output measures included players' age (years), stature (cm...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
Matthew Cross7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Bath),
Simon Kemp22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 2 AuthorsKeith Stokes24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Bath)
Aim To investigate incidence of concussion, clinical outcomes and subsequent injury risk following concussion. Methods In a two-season (2012/2013, 2013/2014) prospective cohort study, incidence of diagnosed match concussions (injuries/1000 h), median time interval to subsequent injury of any type (survival time) and time spent at each stage of the graduated return to play pathway were determined in 810 professional Rugby Union players (1176 player seasons). Results Match concussion incidence was...
Published on Apr 1, 2016in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
Tim J. Gabbett53
Estimated H-index: 53
(ACU: Australian Catholic University),
Billy T. Hulin9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UOW: University of Wollongong)
+ 1 AuthorsRod Whiteley14
Estimated H-index: 14
Clinicians or strength and conditioning professionals who prescribe training workloads aim for workloads that are high enough to improve fitness (ie, performance), but not so high as to risk injury. At the extremes, no training results in an unprepared athlete, whereas an overuse injury is, by definition, an error in training prescription.1 Banister et al 2 first described an athlete's training state as the difference between positive (ie, ‘fitness’) and negative (ie, ‘fatigue’) influences. To q...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in American Journal of Sports Medicine 6.09
M. Alison Brooks11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison),
Kaitlin Peterson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)
+ 3 AuthorsDavid R. Bell18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Background:Previous studies have identified abnormalities in brain and motor functioning after concussion that persist well beyond observed clinical recovery. Recent work suggests subtle deficits in neurocognition may impair neuromuscular control and thus potentially increase risk of lower extremity musculoskeletal injury after concussion.Purpose:To determine the odds of sustaining an acute lower extremity musculoskeletal injury during the 90-day period after return to play from concussion in a ...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in British Journal of Sports Medicine 11.64
Tim J. Gabbett53
Estimated H-index: 53
(ACU: Australian Catholic University)
Background There is dogma that higher training load causes higher injury rates. However, there is also evidence that training has a protective effect against injury. For example, team sport athletes who performed more than 18 weeks of training before sustaining their initial injuries were at reduced risk of sustaining a subsequent injury, while high chronic workloads have been shown to decrease the risk of injury. Second, across a wide range of sports, well-developed physical qualities are assoc...
Published on Jul 1, 2015in Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
Isabel S. Moore8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Cardiff Metropolitan University),
Craig Ranson14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Cardiff Metropolitan University),
Prabhat Mathema3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Cardiff University)
Background:Within international Rugby Union, only injury rates during the Rugby World Cup have been reported. Therefore, injury rates and types during other international tournaments are unknown.Purpose:To assess the 3-year incidence, severity, nature, and causes of match and training injuries sustained during different international tournaments played by the Welsh national Rugby Union team.Study Design:Descriptive epidemiology study.Methods:Injury data for all players (n = 78) selected for 1 na...
Cited By3
Newest
Published on Jun 4, 2019
Jon Brazier3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
M Antrobus2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 4 AuthorsAlun G. Williams24
Estimated H-index: 24
This article reviews tendon and ligament injury incidence and severity within elite rugby union and rugby league. Furthermore, it discusses the biological makeup of tendons and ligaments and how genetic variation may influence this and predisposition to injury. Elite rugby has one of the highest reported injury incidences of any professional sport. This is likely due to a combination of well-established injury surveillance systems and the characteristics of the game, whereby high-impact body con...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in arXiv: Human-Computer Interaction
Mohamed Mostafa2
Estimated H-index: 2
Over the past 15 years, the volume, richness and quality of data collected from the combined social networking platforms has increased beyond all expectation, providing researchers from a variety of disciplines to use it in their research. Perhaps more impactfully, it has provided the foundation for a range of new products and services, transforming industries such as advertising and marketing, as well as bringing the challenges of sharing personal data into the public consciousness. But how to ...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in BMJ open sport and exercise medicine
Neil E. Hill7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Imperial College Healthcare),
Sian Rilstone1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 4 AuthorsNick Oliver17
Estimated H-index: 17
Objectives We sought to establish the effects of professionalism, which officially began in 1995, on the body mass and height of northern hemisphere male international rugby union (RU) players. We hypothesised that mass would significantly increase following professionalism. We also investigated the changes in size of players according to their playing position, and we compared changes to rugby league (RL) players and the public. Methods The body mass and height of players representing their int...