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Reinterpretation of a previously described Jehol bird clarifies early trophic evolution in the Ornithuromorpha

Published on Jan 31, 2018
· DOI :10.1098/rspb.2017.2494
Xiaoting Zheng15
Estimated H-index: 15
(LYU: Linyi University),
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 2 AuthorsZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
Cite
Abstract
STM35-3 from the Yixian Formation is the only Early Cretaceous ornithuromorph preserving direct evidence of granivory. The crop contains numerous seeds and the preservation of gastroliths presumably within the ventriculus indicates this diet was paired with the presence of a gastric mill as in living granivorous birds. STM35-3 was originally referred to Hongshanornis longicresta, member of a diverse clade of small, basal ornithuromorphs with elongate hindlimbs known as the Hongshanornithidae. Hindlimb proportions suggest that hongshanornithids were wading birds, an ecological inference somewhat in conflict with direct evidence suggesting Hongshanornis fed on seeds. However, close inspection of STM35-3 reveals that the specimen represents a new species not closely related to hongshanornithids, distinguished by large forelimbs that exceed the length of the hindlimbs, robust and narrow coracoids, and a delicate edentulous rostrum. By contrast, all hongshanornithids have hindlimbs that far exceed the length o...
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  • References (30)
  • Citations (6)
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References30
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2018in Cretaceous Research2.12
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Xiaoli Wang17
Estimated H-index: 17
(LYU: Linyi University)
+ 5 AuthorsZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Seeds preserved in association with the holotype of Jeholornis prima provided the first direct evidence of granivory in any Mesozoic bird. Although this long boney-tailed bird also displays several morphological indicators correlated with herbivory such as reduced dentition and a deep mandible, Jeholornis has not been previously reported to possess a gastric mill. However, this feature is commonly linked to herbivory in theropod dinosaurs and present in at least one sympatric ornithurom...
Published on Jan 2, 2017in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology2.31
Min Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
ZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Most living birds characteristically grow rapidly and reach adult size within a year. Nevertheless, little is known about how such an advanced developmental strategy evolved despite many discoveries of early fossil birds. Here we assess the long-bone histology from a new adult specimen of Archaeorhynchus spathula, the basalmost taxon of Ornithuromorpha. Ornithuromorpha is the most inclusive clade containing extant birds but not the Mesozoic Enantiornithes. Histological analysis reveals that the ...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Current Biology9.19
Shuo Wang6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Josef Stiegler2
Estimated H-index: 2
(GW: George Washington University)
+ 4 AuthorsXing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Summary Ontogenetic variation is documented within many dinosaur species, but extreme ontogenetic changes are rare among dinosaurs, particularly among theropods. Here, we analyze 19 specimens of the Jurassic ceratosaurian theropod Limusaurus inextricabilis , representing six ontogenetic stages based on body size and histological data. Among 78 ontogenetic changes we identify in these specimens, the most unexpected one is the change from fully toothed jaws in the hatchling and juvenile individual...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Current Biology9.19
Laura C.D. Pomatto12
Estimated H-index: 12
(SC: University of Southern California),
Caroline Carney2
Estimated H-index: 2
(SC: University of Southern California)
+ 5 AuthorsJohn Tower28
Estimated H-index: 28
(SC: University of Southern California)
Summary Multiple human diseases involving chronic oxidative stress show a significant sex bias, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, immune dysfunction, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. However, a possible molecular mechanism for the sex bias in physiological adaptation to oxidative stress remains unclear. Here, we report that Drosophila melanogaster females but not males adapt to hydrogen peroxide stress, whereas males but not females adapt to paraquat (superoxide) stress. Stress ...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Nature Communications11.88
Min Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Xiaoting Zheng15
Estimated H-index: 15
+ 5 AuthorsZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
The origin and diversification of early birds remain unclear. Here, the authors report fossils from the oldest known ornithuromorph bird, recovered from the Huajiying Formation in China, which pushes the divergence of these and other early bird lineages back to the Jurassic–Cretaceous transition.
Published on Dec 1, 2014in Chinese Science Bulletin
Shuang Zhou4
Estimated H-index: 4
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Min Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
We report on a new species of ornithuromorph bird, Iteravis huchzermeyeri gen. et sp. nov., from the previously unreported Sihedang locality of the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation, the oldest ornithuromorph bearing deposit in the world. Unlike most other Cretaceous localities, specimens from this new quarry are largely referable to Ornithuromorpha, similar to the Lower Cretaceous Aptian Xiagou Formation in Gansu Province. Also similar to the Xiagou avifauna, the fauna at Sihedang is largely do...
Published on Apr 14, 2014in PLOS ONE2.78
Xiaoting Zheng15
Estimated H-index: 15
(LYU: Linyi University),
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
A crop adapted for an herbivorous diet of seeds has previously been documented in the Early Cretaceous birds Sapeornis and Hongshanornis. Here we report on several specimens of Yanornis that preserve a crop containing fish. One specimen preserves two whole fish in the oesophagus, indicating that Early Cretaceous birds shared trophic specializations with Neornithes for the increased energetic demands of flight – namely the storing of food for later consumption when the stomach is full. Whole fish...
Published on Jan 2, 2014in PeerJ2.35
Luis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County),
Bo Zhao3
Estimated H-index: 3
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
+ 6 AuthorsXiaodong Cheng4
Estimated H-index: 4
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
The discovery of Hongshanornis longicresta, a small ornithuromorph bird with unusually long hindlimb proportions, was followed by the discovery of two closely related species, Longicrusavis houi and Parahongshanornis chaoyangensis. Together forming the Hongshanornithidae, these species reveal important information about the early diversity and morphological specialization of ornithuromorphs, the clade that contains all living birds. Here we report on a new specimen (DNHM D2945/6) referable to Ho...
Published on Oct 11, 2013in PLOS ONE2.78
Ya-Ming Wang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsHai-Lu You20
Estimated H-index: 20
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Here we report on three new species of ornithuromorph birds from the Lower Cretaceous Xiagou Formation in the Changma Basin of Gansu Province, northwestern China: Yumenornis huangi gen. et sp. nov., Changmaornis houi gen. et sp. nov., and Jiuquanornis niui gen. et sp. nov.. The last of these is based on a previously published but unnamed specimen: GSGM-05-CM-021. Although incomplete, the specimens can be clearly distinguished from each other and from Gansus yumenensis Hou and Liu, 1984. Phylogen...
Published on Oct 1, 2013in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology2.31
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
ZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
We review the enigmatic Chaoyangia beishanensis, one of the earliest birds described from the Jiufotang Formation, north-eastern China, and the first to be identified as an ornithurine (Aves: Ornithothoraces) and thus a member of the clade that includes living birds. A complete discussion of the validity of this taxon, which once included the holotype of Songlingornis, is provided, along with a revised diagnosis. The morphology of Chaoyangia is described, including extensive comparison with bett...
Cited By6
Newest
Published on Jul 10, 2019in PeerJ2.35
Scott A. Hartman1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison),
Mickey Mortimer + 3 AuthorsDavid M. Lovelace8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Current Biology9.19
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 5 AuthorsFuming Lei (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Summary Recent discoveries of vertebrate remains trapped in middle Cretaceous amber from northern Myanmar [ 1 , 2 ] have provided insights into the morphology of soft-tissue structures in extinct animals [ 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 ], in particular, into the evolution and paleobiology of early birds [ 4 , 8 , 9 ]. So far, five bird specimens have been described from Burmese amber: two isolated wings, an isolated foot with wing fragment, and two partial skeletons [ 4 , 8 , 9 , 10 ]. Most of these specime...
Published on Mar 22, 2019in Historical Biology1.49
Junyou Wang (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History), Xiuzhi Hao + 15 AuthorsQuentin Monfroy (University of Pavol Jozef Šafárik)
ABSTRACTWe present the first description of the bone microstructure of the ornithuromorph bird Yanornis from the Early Cretaceous Jehol ornithofauna. Yanornis is a derived member of independent ornithuromorphan clade, itself the sister group to the clade including Iteravis and ornithurans (including modern birds). We demonstrate that Yanornis grew continuously and probably was fully grown within the first or second year of life. No growth marks indicating cessations in bone deposition are presen...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Current Biology9.19
Daniel T. Ksepka20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Lance Grande1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of C: University of Chicago),
Gerald Mayr32
Estimated H-index: 32
Summary Beak shape plays a key role in avian radiations and is one of the most intensely studied aspects of avian evolution and ecology [1–4]. Perhaps no other group is more closely associated with the study of beak shape than Passeriformes (passerines or perching birds), the most species-rich ordinal clade of modern birds. However, despite their extraordinary present-day diversity, our understanding of early passerine evolution has been hindered by their sparse fossil record [5, 6]. Here, we de...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.62
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Although direct associations that reveal diet are extremely rare in the fossil record, the rich Lower Cretaceous Jehol Lagerstatte has produced dozens of specimens preserving ingested items, which together reveal important information regarding the early evolution of the avian alimentary canal. Direct evidence indicates Jeholornis and Sapeornis ate seeds and like living granivores utilized a gastric mill although only the more derived Sapeornis possessed a crop for food storage. Despite...
Published on May 1, 2018in Nature43.07
Daniel J. Field13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Bath),
Michael Hanson3
Estimated H-index: 3
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
+ 5 AuthorsBhart-Anjan S. Bhullar14
Estimated H-index: 14
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
The skull of living birds is greatly modified from the condition found in their dinosaurian antecedents. Bird skulls have an enlarged, toothless premaxillary beak and an intricate kinetic system that includes a mobile palate and jaw suspensorium. The expanded avian neurocranium protects an enlarged brain and is flanked by reduced jaw adductor muscles. However, the order of appearance of these features and the nature of their earliest manifestations remain unknown. The Late Cretaceous toothed bir...