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References40
Newest
Published on Oct 23, 2017in ZooKeys 1.08
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
,
Jennifer C. Thomas5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Abdulaziz S. Alqarni10
Estimated H-index: 10
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Systematic Entomology 4.24
Phillip Barden6
Estimated H-index: 6
(NJIT: New Jersey Institute of Technology),
Hollister W. Herhold1
Estimated H-index: 1
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History),
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
An unusual Cretaceous trap jaw ant is described from Burmese amber dated to the Late Cretaceous. Linguamyrmex vladi gen.n. sp.n. is distinguished by an unusual suite of morphological characters indicating specialized predatory behaviour and an adaptive strategy no longer found among modern ant lineages. The clypeus, highly modified as in other closely related haidomyrmecine hell ants, is equipped with a paddle-like projection similar to Ceratomyrmex. X-ray imaging reveals that this clypeal paddl...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas),
Bo Wang17
Estimated H-index: 17
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The exclusively Cretaceous braconid wasp subfamily Protorhyssalinae is reported from the Upper Cretaceous deposits of northern Myanmar. Archaeorhyssalus subsolanus Engel, gen. et sp. nov., is represented by a well-preserved female in Burmese amber and is similar to other protorhyssalines, but differs in numerous details of forewing venation and flagellomere number. This species is the first definitive Oriental occurrence for protorhyssalines, expanding their palaeogeographic distributio...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.25
Vincent Perrichot15
Estimated H-index: 15
(KU: University of Kansas),
Bo Wang17
Estimated H-index: 17
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas)
Summary Ants comprise one lineage of the triumvirate of eusocial insects and experienced their early diversification within the Cretaceous [1–9]. Their ecological success is generally attributed to their remarkable social behavior. Not all ants cooperate in social hunting, however, and some of the most effective predatory ants are solitary hunters with powerful trap jaws [10]. Recent evolutionary studies predict that the early branching lineages of extant ants formed small colonies of ground-dwe...
19 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 16, 2016
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
A new genus and species of basal cyclostome Braconidae is described and figured from a male preserved in mid-Cretaceous amber from northern Myanmar. Rhetinorhyssalus morticinus Engel, new genus and species, is interesting for its combination of primitive features such as a minute apical costal cell and anal stubs in the forewing, while lacking 2Cu in the hind wing, a putatively derived trait. As such, the genus may represent a lineage diverging from the braconid stem subsequent to many protorhys...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.25
Phillip Barden6
Estimated H-index: 6
(RU: Rutgers University),
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(CUNY: City University of New York)
Summary Across terrestrial ecosystems, modern ants are ubiquitous. As many as 94 out of every 100 individual arthropods in rainforests are ants [1], and they constitute up to 15% of animal biomass in the Amazon [2, 3]. Moreover, ants are pervasive agents of natural selection as over 10,000 arthropod species are specialized inquilines or myrmecomorphs living among ants or defending themselves through mimicry [4, 5]. Such impact is traditionally explained by sociality: ants are the first major gro...
30 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 9, 2014in Zootaxa 0.93
Buntika A. Butcher4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Chula: Chulalongkorn University),
Alejandro Zaldívar-Riverón15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico)
+ 3 AuthorsDonald L. J. Quicke41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Chula: Chulalongkorn University)
Two new species of the parasitic wasp genus Mesocentrus Szepligeti (Betylobraconinae) are described. One based on a new species from Papua New Guinea, the other the first Palaearctic member of the subfamily based on a 30+ mya, species from Baltic amber. The second species is illustrated using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Whereas the extant Betylobraconinae are restricted to Australia, New Guinea and New Caledonia, their ancestral distribution is now known to have extended considerably furt...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 13, 2014
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas)
The first fossil orchid bee from Early Miocene Mexican amber is described and figured. Eulaema ( Apeulaema ) zigrasi Engel, new species, represents the first non-meliponine bee fossil documented from Mexican amber as well as the first fossil of its genus. The new species is distinguished from its congeners and comments are briefly made regarding the geological history of Euglossini.
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 3, 2014in PLOS ONE 2.77
Phillip Barden6
Estimated H-index: 6
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History),
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
A new collection of 24 wingless ant specimens from mid-Cretaceous Burmese amber (Albian-Cenomanian, 99 Ma) comprises nine new species belonging to the genus Sphecomyrmodes Engel and Grimaldi. Described taxa vary considerably with regard to total size, head and body proportion, cuticular sculpturing, and petiole structure while all species are unified by a distinct shared character. The assemblage represents the largest known diversification of closely related Cretaceous ants with respect to spec...
15 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 30, 2013in Zootaxa 0.93
Alexandre P. Aguiar6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Andrew Robert Deans17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 12 AuthorsVolker Lohrmann3
Estimated H-index: 3
An updated classification of the order Hymenoptera is provided with the current numbers of genera and species described so far specified. The order is composed of 2 suborders, 27 superfamilies, 132 families, 8423 extant genera with an additional 685 extinct genera. Considered one of the most species-rich insects orders a total of 153088 extant species have been described, in addition to 2429 extinct species.
47 Citations Source Cite
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2018
Qi Zhang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Qufu Normal University),
Alexandr P. Rasnitsyn13
Estimated H-index: 13
(RAS: Russian Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsHaichun Zhang20
Estimated H-index: 20
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The Burmese amber assemblage of Hymenoptera with its 47 constituent families is now the richest in Cretaceous. A collection of Burmite (Burmese amber) from the Hukawng Valley, Myanmar at the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences was examined, revealing that Burmite inclusions contain a very highly diverse hymenopteran fauna with as many as ten families found new for the Burmese fossil assemblage. The mid-Cretaceous hymenopteran fauna of Burmese ambe...
4 Citations Source Cite