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Vanishing of the common species: Empty habitats and the role of genetic diversity

Published on Feb 1, 2018in Biological Conservation 4.66
· DOI :10.1016/j.biocon.2017.12.018
Jan Christian Habel25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Technische Universität München),
Thomas Schmitt26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
Abstract
Abstract Biodiversity is declining, with major causes identified as habitat loss and a reduction of habitat quality. Recent studies have shown that particularly species with specific habitat demands are suffering in this way. Accordingly, habitat specialists have been nominated as umbrella species, which because they represent a much larger number of species, are thought best to fulfil the requirements of nature conservation. However, species which are ecologically intermediate between habitat specialists and generalists, and typically form networks of populations on adjoining habitats, might suffer even more severely under rapid habitat fragmentation than those specialists which had for a long time already occurred as discrete populations. Today, most of these formerly more widely distributed intermediate species also exist only as small and isolated populations which, because of their increasing geographic isolation, cannot counterbalance local extinctions by recolonisation. Furthermore, these species are mostly equipped with relatively high genetic diversity that is maintained by continual exchange of individuals between local populations. However, this high level of genetic variability frequently decreases after the collapse of population networks – with negative effects on the viability of these species. Thus, factors at the population and molecular levels may lead that formerly common species vanish in the near future.
  • References (41)
  • Citations (9)
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References41
Newest
Published on Oct 18, 2017in PLOS ONE 2.77
Caspar A. Hallmann7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Martin Sorg1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 9 AuthorsThomas Hörren1
Estimated H-index: 1
Global declines in insects have sparked wide interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. Loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardize ecosystem services. Our understanding of the extent and underlying causes of this decline is based on the abundance of single species or taxonomic groups only, rather than changes in insect biomass which is more relevant for ecological functioning. Here, we used a standardized pr...
234 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Biological Conservation 4.66
An Vanden Broeck7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Dirk Maes27
Estimated H-index: 27
+ 6 AuthorsJoachim Mergeay23
Estimated H-index: 23
Abstract Understanding connectivity among populations in fragmented landscapes is of paramount importance in species conservation because it determines their long-term viability and helps to identify and prioritize populations to conserve. Rare and sedentary species are particularly vulnerable to habitat fragmentation as they occupy narrow niches or restricted habitat ranges. Here, we assess contemporary interpopulation connectedness of the threatened, myrmecophilous butterfly, Maculinea alcon ,...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Annales Zoologici Fennici 0.73
Paul R. Ehrlich97
Estimated H-index: 97
(Stanford University)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Conservation Biology 5.89
Jan Christian Habel25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Technische Universität München),
Andreas Segerer1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 3 AuthorsThomas Schmitt26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
Environmental changes strongly impact the distribution of species and subsequently the composition of species assemblages. Although most community ecology studies represent temporal snap shots, long-term observations are rather rare. However, only such time series allow the identification of species composition shifts over several decades or even centuries. We analyzed changes in the species composition of a southeastern German butterfly and burnet moth community over nearly 2 centuries (1840-20...
32 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 15, 2016in Science 41.06
Jeremy A. Thomas36
Estimated H-index: 36
(University of Oxford)
Butterflies are better documented and monitored worldwide than any other nonpest taxon of insects ( 1 ). In the United Kingdom alone, volunteer recorders have sampled more than 750,000 km of repeat transects since 1976, equivalent to walking to the Moon and back counting butterflies ( 2 ). Such programs are revealing regional extinctions and population declines that began before 1900 ( 3 , 4 ). In a recent study, Habel et al. report a similar story based on inventories of butterflies and burnet ...
26 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Niko Balkenhol21
Estimated H-index: 21
,
Iris Biebach8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 7 AuthorsFrank E. Zachos26
Estimated H-index: 26
1 Citations
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Jan Christian Habel25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Technische Universität München),
Jürgen Dengler29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Bayreuth)
+ 3 AuthorsMichal Wiezik5
Estimated H-index: 5
Biodiversity is not homogenously distributed over the globe, and ecosystems differ strongly in the number of species they provide. With this special issue we highlight the ecology and endangerment of one of the most diverse ecosystem of Europe: the European grassland ecosystems. The selected 16 contributions describe interactions from below-ground to the atmosphere and focus on (1) effects of abiotic and biotic on species diversity, (2) the impact of various factors along spatial and temporal gr...
93 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Katharina J. Filz5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Jan O. Engler14
Estimated H-index: 14
+ 2 AuthorsThomas Schmitt31
Estimated H-index: 31
Butterflies are strongly declining on grassland habitats of Central Europe. Therefore, the success of conservation measures on high quality grassland habitats is controversially discussed. We compared the changes in butterfly diversity and community structure on six managed calcareous grasslands with eight unmanaged vineyard fallows. We obtained strong losses of species diversity and remarkable shifts of community compositions on both habitat types. However, the changes on vineyard fallows were ...
20 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2013in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Jan Christian Habel25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Technische Universität München),
Dennis Rödder27
Estimated H-index: 27
+ 1 AuthorsThomas Schmitt31
Estimated H-index: 31
The level of genetic diversity found for species is strongly influenced by properties of the species’ ecology, abundance and behaviour (as dispersal). To address this coherence, we selected twenty-two grassland butterfly and burnet moth species, which were previously analysed by allozyme electrophoresis (using 15–25 loci per species) over a study area in western Germany with adjoining areas of Luxembourg and north-eastern France. For this study area, we calculated the species’ specific climatic ...
19 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2012in Biological Conservation 4.66
Teja Tscharntke101
Estimated H-index: 101
(University of Göttingen),
Yann Clough27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Göttingen)
+ 5 AuthorsAnthony M. Whitbread19
Estimated H-index: 19
(University of Göttingen)
Abstract Under the current scenario of rapid human population increase, achieving efficient and productive agricultural land use while conserving biodiversity is a global challenge. There is an ongoing debate whether land for nature and for production should be segregated (land sparing) or integrated on the same land (land sharing, wildlife-friendly farming). While recent studies argue for agricultural intensification in a land sparing approach, we suggest here that it fails to account for real-...
758 Citations Source Cite
Cited By9
Newest
Published on May 13, 2019in Journal of Wildlife Management 2.06
Timothy D. Meehan3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Samantha Arthur + 2 AuthorsGary M. Langham10
Estimated H-index: 10
Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2019in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Jan Christian Habel2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Salzburg),
Michael J. Samways37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Stellenbosch University),
Thomas Schmitt26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
Severe decline in terrestrial insect species richness, abundance, flying biomass, and local extinctions across Europe are cause for alarm. Here, we summarize this decline, and identify species affected most. We then focus on the species that might respond best to mitigation measures relative to their traits. We review apparent drivers of decline, and critically reflect on strengths and weaknesses of existing studies, while emphasising their general significance. Generality of recent scientific f...
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Published on Apr 29, 2019
Ingo Grass7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Göttingen),
Jacqueline Loos10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Göttingen)
+ 11 AuthorsJulia Tiede (University of Münster)
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Published on Apr 18, 2019in bioRxiv
Tyson Wepprich (Oregon State University), Jeffrey R. Adrion4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Oregon)
+ 2 AuthorsNick M. Haddad3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Michigan State University)
Severe insect declines make headlines, but are rarely based on systematic monitoring outside of Europe. We estimate the rate of change in total butterfly abundance and the population trends for 81 species using 21 years of systematic monitoring in Ohio, USA. Total abundance is declining at 2% per year, resulting in a cumulative 33% reduction in butterfly abundance. Three times as many species have negative population trends compared to positive trends. The rate of total decline and the proportio...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Kristina Plenk2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna),
Katharina Bardy1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna)
+ 1 AuthorsMatthias Kropf13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna)
Many steppe species reach their (north)westernmost distribution limit in western Central Europe. This also applies to Poa badensis, a rare steppe plant of calcareous rock/sand vegetation. To explore potential differences in reproductive success and genetic composition of peripheral populations, we analysed the absolute (north)westernmost occurrences in Western Germany and populations at the western margin (Eastern Austria) and the centre (Central Hungary) of the Pannonicum, representing a part o...
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Published on Jan 18, 2019in Biological Journal of The Linnean Society 2.53
Joan C. Hinojosa2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Spanish National Research Council),
Yeray Monasterio1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsRoger Vila26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Spanish National Research Council)
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Published on Nov 9, 2018in bioRxiv
Timothy D. Meehan3
Estimated H-index: 3
(National Audubon Society),
Samantha Arthur + 2 AuthorsGary M. Langham10
Estimated H-index: 10
(National Audubon Society)
Tricolored blackbird (Agelaius tricolor) is a colonial breeder, largely restricted to grasslands, wetlands, and agricultural habitats of California. Tricolored blackbird abundance declined considerably during the 20th century. Recent trends have been less clear, however, hindering efforts to evaluate the conservation needs of the species. We assessed trends in tricolored blackbird colony size using the 2008, 2011, 2014, and 2017 Triennial Tricolored Blackbird Statewide Survey, a community-scienc...
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Published on Oct 2, 2018in Journal of Bryology 1.08
Lars Hedenäs2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Swedish Museum of Natural History)
Cryptic species are rarer than their combined, morphologically recognisable species. Each cryptic species may have its own habitat requirements and distribution, and each should be considered separately in biodiversity conservation. This investigation explores how well the two cryptic species of the wetland moss Hamatocaulis vernicosus (Mitt.) Hedenas s.l., included in Annex II of the EU Habitat Directive, are safeguarded in existing protected sites in Sweden. Further, the northern distribution ...
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