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“Ecological Armageddon” – more evidence for the drastic decline in insect numbers

Published on Jan 1, 2018in Annals of Applied Biology 2.05
· DOI :10.1111/aab.12410
Simon R. Leather38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Harper Adams University)
Abstract
Research into insect decline over the years indicates increased funding is required for long term monitoring and more research to support sustainable agriculture. Planning authorities need to consider how to mitigate the impact of urbanisation and roads on invertebrate populations.
  • References (21)
  • Citations (12)
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References21
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 3.54
Audrey Alignier10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Institut national de la recherche agronomique)
Abstract Field margins have considerable ecological significance in agricultural landscapes by providing habitat and resources for farmland biodiversity. Few attempts have been made to examine the long term dynamics of multiple vegetation communities in field margins, at the landscape scale. In addition, drivers and processes governing such long term vegetation dynamics are poorly investigated. The aim of the study was to assess whether the diversity and composition of a field margin metacommuni...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 18, 2017in PLOS ONE 2.77
Caspar A. Hallmann7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Martin Sorg1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 9 AuthorsThomas Hörren1
Estimated H-index: 1
Global declines in insects have sparked wide interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. Loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardize ecosystem services. Our understanding of the extent and underlying causes of this decline is based on the abundance of single species or taxonomic groups only, rather than changes in insect biomass which is more relevant for ecological functioning. Here, we used a standardized pr...
234 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Biological Journal of The Linnean Society 2.53
John C. Briggs31
Estimated H-index: 31
(Oregon State University)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2017in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Mari Jönsson14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences),
Alejandro Ruete7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
+ 2 AuthorsTord Snäll24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Incorporating functional values in biodiversity monitoring systems could add novel perspectives of the status of biodiversity in conservation areas. Stable frequencies of large foliose nitrogen-fixing cyanolichens likely have positive effects on the nitrogen budget of forests and provide food, material and shelter for invertebrates, gastropods and birds. Stable volumes of deadwood and frequencies of associated fungi provide an important supporting function for ecosystem services such as nutrient...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Ecological Indicators 3.98
Emily B. Dennis6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Kent),
Byron J. T. Morgan37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Kent)
+ 1 AuthorsTom Brereton27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Butterfly Conservation)
Most people live in urban environments and there is a need to produce abundance indices to assist policy and management of urban greenspaces and gardens. While regional indices are produced, with the exception of birds, studies of the differences between urban and rural areas are rare. We explore these differences for UK butterflies, with the intention to describe changes that are relevant to people living in urban areas, in order to better connect people with nature in support of conservation, ...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Advances in Ecological Research 4.91
Jonathan Storkey21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Rothamsted Research),
Andy Macdonald26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Rothamsted Research)
+ 6 AuthorsA.P. Whitmore37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Rothamsted Research)
Abstract The Rothamsted Estate in Hertfordshire, United Kingdom, is home to the longest running ecological and agricultural experiments in the world that have generated unique data sets on the assembly and functioning of ecosystems that stretch back more than 170 years. In addition, the Rothamsted Sample Archive contains over 300,000 samples of dried soil, herbage, straw and grain dating back to the start of the first experiments. Additional long-term experiments were set up in the mid-1900s and...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Global Change Biology 9.00
Julie A. Ewald8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust),
Christopher J. Wheatley4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust)
+ 4 AuthorsMichael B. Morecroft1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Natural England)
Cereal fields are central to balancing food production and environmental health in the face of climate change. Within them, invertebrates provide key ecosystem services. Using 42 years of monitoring data collected in southern England, we investigated the sensitivity and resilience of invertebrates in cereal fields to extreme weather events and examined the effect of long-term changes in temperature, rainfall and pesticide use on invertebrate abundance. Of the 26 invertebrate groups examined, ele...
17 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
James H. Baxter-Gilbert4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Laurentian University),
Julia L. Riley8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Laurentian University)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid Lesbarrères21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Laurentian University)
Pollinating insects are vital to the survival of many primary producers in terrestrial ecosystems, as up to 80–85 % of the world’s flowering plants require pollinators for reproduction. Over the last few decades however, numerous pollinating insect populations have declined substantially. The causes of these declines are multifaceted and synergistic, and include pesticides, herbicides, monoculture, urbanization, disease, parasites, and climate change. Here, we present evidence for a generally un...
33 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Animal Ecology 4.46
James R. Bell23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Rothamsted Research),
L. J. Alderson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Rothamsted Research)
+ 7 AuthorsR. Harrington41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Rothamsted Research)
1. Aphids represent a significant challenge to food production. The Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS) runs a network of 12·2-m suction-traps throughout the year to collect migrating aphids. In 2014, the RIS celebrated its 50th anniversary. This paper marks that achievement with an extensive spatiotemporal analysis and the provision of the first British annotated checklist of aphids since 1964. 2. Our main aim was to elucidate mechanisms that advance aphid phenology under climate change and explain ...
40 Citations Source Cite
Mark Vellend43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Université de Sherbrooke),
Lander Baeten28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Ghent University)
+ 6 AuthorsSonja Wipf27
Estimated H-index: 27
Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a...
193 Citations Source Cite
Cited By12
Newest
Published on Mar 29, 2019in Nature Communications 12.35
Andreas Schuldt17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg),
Anne Ebeling17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Jena)
+ 19 AuthorsFelix Fornoff4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Freiburg)
Humans modify ecosystems and biodiversity worldwide, with negative consequences for ecosystem functioning. Promoting plant diversity is increasingly suggested as a mitigation strategy. However, our mechanistic understanding of how plant diversity affects the diversity of heterotrophic consumer communities remains limited. Here, we disentangle the relative importance of key components of plant diversity as drivers of herbivore, predator, and parasitoid species richness in experimental forests and...
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Published on Jul 1, 2019in Environmental Science & Policy 3.83
Andrew M. Allen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Anouschka R. Hof10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Abstract An increasingly gloomy picture is painted by research focusing on the environmental challenges faced by our planet. Biodiversity loss is ongoing, landscapes continue to transform, and predictions on the effects of climate change worsen. Calls have been made for urgent action to avoid pushing our planet into a new system state. One of the principal threats to biodiversity is intensive agriculture, and in particular the livestock industry, which is an important driver of greenhouse gas em...
Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Ecological Indicators 3.98
N. Barsoum1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Catharine Bruce3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CABI)
+ 2 AuthorsDouglas W. Yu39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of East Anglia)
Abstract Gauging trends in forest biodiversity and relating these to forest management practice and environmental change requires effective monitoring and assessment of spatio-temporal trends in forest biodiversity. Taxa- and habitat-based surrogate measures of biodiversity, or ‘biodiversity indicators’, are commonly used to convey information about the state of the biological community since they can be assessed relatively quickly and cheaply by non-experts. Direct measures of a component of bi...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 26, 2019in Environmental Science and Pollution Research 2.80
Richard A. Brain23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Syngenta),
Julie C. Anderson10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Winnipeg)
Urbanization is an inevitable process in human civilization. When populations expand, socio-economic and political dynamics typically shift from agricultural predominance to one of industry and services. Accordingly, agrarian societies transform from diffuse rural communities to dense urban centers. By 2050, the world’s population is projected to reach 9.1 billion, with the urban population growing from 50 to 70%. Inevitably, this ever-expanding urban frontier encroaches along the human-ecologic...
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Published on May 1, 2019in Biological Conservation 4.66
Daniel H. Janzen82
Estimated H-index: 82
(University of Pennsylvania),
Winnie Hallwachs25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Pennsylvania)
Abstract I have been watching the gradual and very visible decline of Mexican and Central American insect density and species richness since 1953 and Winnie since 1978. The loss is very real for essentially all higher taxa, and the reasons are very evident: intense forest and agricultural simplification of very large areas, massive use of pesticides, habitat fragmentation, and at least since the 1980's, ever-increasing climate change in temperature, rainfall, and synchronization of seasonal cues...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 5, 2019in Journal of Ornithology 1.95
Antoine Sierro , Andreas Erhardt25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Basel)
Increasing light emissions caused by human activities have been recognized as a major threat for nocturnal animals. In Switzerland, the European Nightjar is a rare bird, decreasing in numbers since the 1970s, and is therefore highly threatened. The last breeding population occurs in the canton Valais. Initial expert-based conservation measures on formerly inhabited breeding sites were successful until 2000, however recent additional measures have failed. Nightjars are highly sensitive to light d...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Oryx 2.33
Martin Fisher14
Estimated H-index: 14
Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Dorothea Nolte1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Lüneburg University),
Estève Boutaud1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Lüneburg University)
+ 2 AuthorsThorsten Assmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Lüneburg University)
The worldwide biodiversity crisis is ongoing. To slow down, or even halt future species loss it is important to identify potential drivers of extinction risk. Species traits can help to understand the underlying process of extinction risk. In a comprehensive study on 464 carabid beetle species, we used ordinal logistic regression to analyze the relationship of species traits to extinction risk in Central Europe, taking phylogenetic relatedness into account. To consider varying trait responses in...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Insect Conservation and Diversity 2.09
Katharina Homburg5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Lüneburg University),
Claudia Drees11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Hamburg)
+ 5 AuthorsThorsten Assmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Lüneburg University)
1. The drastic insect decline has received increasing attention in scientific as well as in public media. Long-term studies of insect diversity trends are still rare, even though such studies are highly important to assess extent, drivers and potential consequences of insect loss in ecosystems. 2. To gain insights into carabid diversity trends of ancient and sustainably managed woodlands, we analysed data of carabid beetles from a trapping study that has been run for 24 years in an old nature re...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications 12.35
C RischAnita26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research),
R. Ochoa-Hueso1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Autonomous University of Madrid)
+ 8 AuthorsStephan Zimmermann12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research)
Increasing evidence suggests that community-level responses to human-induced biodiversity loss start with a decrease of interactions among communities and between them and their abiotic environment. The structural and functional consequences of such interaction losses are poorly understood and have rarely been tested in real-world systems. Here, we analysed how 5 years of progressive, size-selective exclusion of large, medium, and small vertebrates and invertebrates—a realistic scenario of human...
5 Citations Source Cite