“Ecological Armageddon” - more evidence for the drastic decline in insect numbers

Published on Jan 1, 2018in Annals of Applied Biology 2.05
· DOI :10.1111/aab.12410
Simon R. Leather37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Harper Adams University)
Abstract
Research into insect decline over the years indicates increased funding is required for long term monitoring and more research to support sustainable agriculture. Planning authorities need to consider how to mitigate the impact of urbanisation and roads on invertebrate populations.
  • References (21)
  • Citations (6)
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References21
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
James H. Baxter-Gilbert4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Laurentian University),
Julia L. Riley7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Laurentian University)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid Lesbarrères20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Laurentian University)
Pollinating insects are vital to the survival of many primary producers in terrestrial ecosystems, as up to 80–85 % of the world’s flowering plants require pollinators for reproduction. Over the last few decades however, numerous pollinating insect populations have declined substantially. The causes of these declines are multifaceted and synergistic, and include pesticides, herbicides, monoculture, urbanization, disease, parasites, and climate change. Here, we present evidence for a generally un...
30 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2004in Journal of Insect Conservation 1.56
Kelvin F. Conrad6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Rothamsted Research),
Ian P. Woiwod30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Rothamsted Research)
+ 2 AuthorsMartin Warren21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Butterfly Conservation)
The Rothamsted Insect Survey has operated a Great Britain-wide network of light-traps since 1968. From these data we estimated the first ever national abundance indices and 35-year population trends for 338 species of common macro-moths. Although the number of trap sites which run each year is not constant, there is a representative, well-distributed core of traps that have run for ≥ 15 years. The proportion of operating sites catching a species and the annual geometric mean catch of successful ...
95 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 23, 2011in PLOS Biology 9.16
Camilo Mora24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Dalhousie University),
Derek P. Tittensor13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Dalhousie University)
+ 2 AuthorsBoris Worm50
Estimated H-index: 50
(Dalhousie University)
The diversity of life is one of the most striking aspects of our planet; hence knowing how many species inhabit Earth is among the most fundamental questions in science. Yet the answer to this question remains enigmatic, as efforts to sample the world's biodiversity to date have been limited and thus have precluded direct quantification of global species richness, and because indirect estimates rely on assumptions that have proven highly controversial. Here we show that the higher taxonomic clas...
891 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Animal Ecology 4.46
James R. Bell19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Rothamsted Research),
Lynda Alderson1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Rothamsted Research)
+ 7 AuthorsR. Harrington38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Rothamsted Research)
1. Aphids represent a significant challenge to food production. The Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS) runs a network of 12·2-m suction-traps throughout the year to collect migrating aphids. In 2014, the RIS celebrated its 50th anniversary. This paper marks that achievement with an extensive spatiotemporal analysis and the provision of the first British annotated checklist of aphids since 1964. 2. Our main aim was to elucidate mechanisms that advance aphid phenology under climate change and explain ...
39 Citations Source Cite
Mark Vellend42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Université de Sherbrooke),
Lander Baeten26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Ghent University)
+ 6 AuthorsSonja Wipf26
Estimated H-index: 26
Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a...
184 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Insect Conservation and Diversity 2.09
Richard Fox28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Butterfly Conservation)
Population declines among insects are inadequately quantified, yet of vital importance to national and global biodiversity assessments and have significant implications for ecosystem services. 2. Substantial declines in abundance and distribution have been reported recently within a species-rich insect taxon, macro-moths, in Great Britain and other Euro- pean countries. These declines are of concern because moths are important primary consumers and prey items for a wide range of other taxa, as w...
98 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 28, 2005in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 5.67
Jeremy A. Thomas34
Estimated H-index: 34
Conservative estimates suggest that 50–90% of the existing insect species on Earth have still to be discovered, yet the named insects alone comprise more than half of all known species of organism. With such poor baseline knowledge, monitoring change in insect diversity poses a formidable challenge to scientists and most attempts to generalize involve large extrapolations from a few well-studied taxa. Butterflies are often the only group for which accurate measures of change can be obtained. Fou...
299 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2009in Biological Conservation 4.66
Viola Clausnitzer11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Marburg),
Vincent J. Kalkman6
Estimated H-index: 6
(National Museum of Natural History)
+ 15 AuthorsKeith D.P. Wilson7
Estimated H-index: 7
The status and trends of global biodiversity are often measured with a bias towards datasets limited to terrestrial vertebrates. The first global assessment of an insect order (Odonata) provides new context to the ongoing discussion of current biodiversity loss. A randomly selected sample of 1500 (26.4%) of the 5680 described dragonflies and damselflies was assessed using IUCN’s Red List criteria. Distribution maps for each species were created and species were assigned to habitat types. These d...
164 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2012in Journal of Applied Ecology 5.74
D. R. Brooks18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Rothamsted Research),
John Bater1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Rothamsted Research)
+ 5 AuthorsJason W. Chapman28
Estimated H-index: 28
(University of Exeter)
Summary 1. Carabid beetles are important functional components of many terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we describe the first long-term, wide-scale and quantitative assessment of temporal changes in UK carabid communities, to inform nationwide management aimed at their conservation. 2. Multivariate and mixed models were used to assess temporal trends over a 15-year period, across eleven sites in the UK Environmental Change Network. Sites covered pasture, field margins, chalk downland, woodland and ...
43 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 19, 2004in Science 41.06
Jeremy A. Thomas34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Natural Environment Research Council),
Mark G. Telfer4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 6 AuthorsJohn H. Lawton91
Estimated H-index: 91
(Imperial College London)
There is growing concern about increased population, regional, and global extinctions of species. A key question is whether extinction rates for one group of organisms are representative of other taxa. We present a comparison at the national scale of population and regional extinctions of birds, butterflies, and vascular plants from Britain in recent decades. Butterflies experienced the greatest net losses, disappearing on average from 13% of their previously occupied 10-kilometer squares. If in...
592 Citations Source Cite
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  • Citations (6)
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Cited By6
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Annals of Applied Biology 2.05
Maja Grubisic2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Free University of Berlin),
R.H.A. van Grunsven1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Butterfly Conservation)
+ 2 AuthorsFranz Hölker32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Leibniz Association)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2018in Annals of Applied Biology 2.05
D. Atanasova , Simon R. Leather37
Estimated H-index: 37
(Harper Adams University)
Over the past decade or so, there has been an increasing concern that the use of conventional synthetic pesticides may be having a detrimental effect not just on pollinators and other beneficial insects (Goulson et al., 2015; Regan et al., 2017), but also on insects in general (Sorg et al., 2013; Pisa et al., 2015; Leather, 2018; Main et al., 2018). In addition, the problem of insect resistance to insecticides is a serious problem, with almost 600 arthropod species‐resistant to one or more of th...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications 12.35
C RischAnita25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research),
R. Ochoa-Hueso1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Autonomous University of Madrid)
+ 8 AuthorsStephan Zimmermann11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research)
Increasing evidence suggests that community-level responses to human-induced biodiversity loss start with a decrease of interactions among communities and between them and their abiotic environment. The structural and functional consequences of such interaction losses are poorly understood and have rarely been tested in real-world systems. Here, we analysed how 5 years of progressive, size-selective exclusion of large, medium, and small vertebrates and invertebrates—a realistic scenario of human...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Ecological Indicators 3.98
N. Barsoum , Catharine Bruce (CABI)+ 2 AuthorsDouglas W. Yu36
Estimated H-index: 36
(University of East Anglia)
Abstract Gauging trends in forest biodiversity and relating these to forest management practice and environmental change requires effective monitoring and assessment of spatio-temporal trends in forest biodiversity. Taxa- and habitat-based surrogate measures of biodiversity, or ‘biodiversity indicators’, are commonly used to convey information about the state of the biological community since they can be assessed relatively quickly and cheaply by non-experts. Direct measures of a component of bi...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Dorothea Nolte1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Estève Boutaud1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsThorsten Assmann23
Estimated H-index: 23
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Published on May 1, 2019in Biological Conservation 4.66
Daniel H. Janzen80
Estimated H-index: 80
(University of Pennsylvania),
Winnie Hallwachs25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Pennsylvania)
Abstract I have been watching the gradual and very visible decline of Mexican and Central American insect density and species richness since 1953 and Winnie since 1978. The loss is very real for essentially all higher taxa, and the reasons are very evident: intense forest and agricultural simplification of very large areas, massive use of pesticides, habitat fragmentation, and at least since the 1980's, ever-increasing climate change in temperature, rainfall, and synchronization of seasonal cues...
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