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High-Resolution Cervical Auscultation Signal Features Reflect Vertical and Horizontal Displacements of the Hyoid Bone During Swallowing

Published on Jan 1, 2019in IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine
· DOI :10.1109/jtehm.2018.2881468
Cedrine Rebrion (University of Pittsburgh), Zhenwei Zhang (University of Pittsburgh)+ 5 AuthorsErvin Sejdić24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Pittsburgh)
Abstract
Millions of people across the globe suffer from swallowing difficulties, known as dysphagia, which can lead to malnutrition, pneumonia, and even death. Swallowing cervical auscultation, which has been suggested as a noninvasive screening method for dysphagia, has not been associated yet with any physical events. In this paper, we have compared the hyoid bone displacement extracted from the videofluoroscopy images of 31 swallows to the signal features extracted from the cervical auscultation recordings captured with a tri-axial accelerometer and a microphone. First, the vertical displacement of the anterior part of the hyoid bone is related to the entropy rate of the superior–inferior swallowing vibrations and to the kurtosis of the swallowing sounds. Second, the vertical displacement of the posterior part of the hyoid bone is related to the bandwidth of the medial–lateral swallowing vibrations. Third, the horizontal displacements of the posterior and anterior parts of the hyoid bone are related to the spectral centroid of the superior–inferior swallowing vibrations and to the peak frequency of the medial–lateral swallowing vibrations, respectively. At last, the airway protection scores and the command characteristics were associated with the vertical and horizontal displacements, respectively, of the posterior part of the hyoid bone. Additional associations between the patients’ characteristics and auscultations’ signals were also observed. The hyoid bone maximal displacement is a cause of swallowing vibrations and sounds. High-resolution cervical auscultation may offer a noninvasive alternative for dysphagia screening and additional diagnostic information.
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 3.08
Atsuko Kurosu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Pittsburgh),
James L. Coyle9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 1 AuthorsErvin Sejdić24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Pittsburgh)
Abstract Objective To examine whether there were any associations between high-resolution cervical auscultation (HRCA) acoustic signals recorded by a contact microphone and swallowing kinematic events during pharyngeal swallow as assessed by a videofluoroscopic (VF) examination. Design Prospective pilot study. Setting University teaching hospital, university research laboratories. Participants Patients (N=35) with stroke who have suspected dysphagia (26 men + 9 women; age = 65.8±11.2). Methods V...
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Published on May 1, 2017in The ASHA Leader
James L. Coyle9
Estimated H-index: 9
Faezeh Movahedi2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Pittsburgh),
Atsuko Kurosu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 2 AuthorsErvin Sejdić24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Pittsburgh)
Swallowing accelerometry is a noninvasive approach currently under consideration as an instrumental screening test for swallowing difficulties, with most current studies focusing on the swallowing vibrations in the anterior-posterior (A-P) and superior-inferior (S-I) directions. However, the displacement of the hyolaryngeal structure during the act of swallowing in patients with dysphagia involves declination of the medial-lateral (M-L), which suggests that the swallowing vibrations in the M-L d...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Clinical Anatomy 1.91
Lenie van den Engel-Hoek8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Marloes Lj Lagarde2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
N. van Alfen25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Radboud University Nijmegen)
Abstract Patients with neuromuscular disorders often present with swallowing difficulties due to oral phase problems and pharyngeal residue after swallow. It is important to assess the underlying pathology and cause of the swallowing disturbance in this patient group, such as dystrophic changes in oral and masticatory muscles. This allows for more patient-tailored recommendations, for example optimal compensation strategies to maintain function for longer. Ultrasound can show structural changes ...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation 3.87
Joshua M. Dudik5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pittsburgh),
Atsuko Kurosu3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 1 AuthorsErvin Sejdić24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Pittsburgh)
Background Aspiration, where food or liquid is allowed to enter the larynx during a swallow, is recognized as the most clinically salient feature of oropharyngeal dysphagia. This event can lead to short-term harm via airway obstruction or more long-term effects such as pneumonia. In order to non-invasively identify this event using high resolution cervical auscultation there is a need to characterize cervical auscultation signals from subjects with dysphagia who aspirate.
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2015in IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering 4.29
Joshua M. Dudik5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pittsburgh),
Iva Jestrović5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 2 AuthorsErvin Sejdić24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Pittsburgh)
Objective: The effects of the chin-tuck maneuver, a technique commonly employed to compensate for dysphagia, on cervical auscultation are not fully understood. Characterizing a technique that is known to affect swallowing function is an important step on the way to developing a new instrumentation-based swallowing screening tool. Methods: In this study, we recorded data from 55 adult participants who each completed five saliva swallows in a chin-tuck position. The resulting data were processed u...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2015in IEEE Transactions on Human-Machine Systems 2.56
Joshua M. Dudik5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pittsburgh),
James L. Coyle9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Pittsburgh),
Ervin Sejdić24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Pittsburgh)
Cervical auscultation is the recording of sounds and vibrations caused by the human body from the throat during swallowing. While traditionally done by a trained clinician with a stethoscope, much work has been put toward developing more sensitive and clinically useful methods to characterize the data obtained with this technique. The eventual goal of the field is to improve the effectiveness of screening algorithms designed to predict the risk that swallowing disorders pose to individual patien...
13 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2015in Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 2.05
C. Fukuike2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Okayama University),
Naoki Kodama4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Okayama University)
+ 6 AuthorsShougo Minagi20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Okayama University)
Summary The wave analysis of swallowing sounds has been receiving attention because the recording process is easy and non-invasive. However, up until now, an expert has been needed to visually examine the entire recorded wave to distinguish swallowing from other sounds. The purpose of this study was to establish a methodology to automatically distinguish the sound of swallowing from sound data recorded during a meal in the presence of everyday ambient sound. Seven healthy participants (mean age:...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2015in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology 17.32
Pere Clavé34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Reza Shaker R59
Estimated H-index: 59
This Review highlightsthe progress that is being made in understanding the pathophysiology, prevalence and potential complications of both oropharyngeal dysphagia and oesophageal dysphagia, particularly in association with impaired physiology. The authors discuss the advances that are paving the way for a transdisciplinary field of deglutology.
79 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 12, 2015in Biomedical Engineering Online 1.68
Joshua M. Dudik5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pittsburgh),
Iva Jestrović5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 2 AuthorsErvin Sejdić24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Pittsburgh)
Background Accelerometry (the measurement of vibrations) and auscultation (the measurement of sounds) are both non-invasive techniques that have been explored for their potential to detect abnormalities in swallowing. The differences between these techniques and the information they capture about swallowing have not previously been explored in a direct comparison.
20 Citations Source Cite
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