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References63
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Gondwana Research6.48
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsMing Bai15
Estimated H-index: 15
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Burmese amber has recently provided some detailed glimpses of plumage, soft tissues, and osteology of juvenile enantiornithine birds, but these insights have been restricted to isolated wing apices. Here we describe nearly half of a hatchling individual, based on osteological and soft tissue data obtained from the skull, neck, feet, and wing, and identified as a member of the extinct avian clade Enantiornithes. Preserved soft tissue provides the unique opportunity to observe the externa...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Nature Communications11.88
Ang Li8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Seth Figueroa2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 4 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
Asymmetric feather vane shape was a critical innovation in feather evolution and adaptation for flight. Here, Li and colleagues characterize the multi-module regulatory network that controls feather vane shape and underlies feather diversification.
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Science Advances
Nicolas Di-Poï9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Geneva),
Michel C. Milinkovitch38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics)
Most mammals, birds, and reptiles are readily recognized by their hairs, feathers, and scales, respectively. However, the lack of fossil intermediate forms between scales and hairs and substantial differences in their morphogenesis and protein composition have fueled the controversy pertaining to their potential common ancestry for decades. Central to this debate is the apparent lack of an “anatomical placode” (that is, a local epidermal thickening characteristic of feathers’ and hairs’ early mo...
Published on Mar 15, 2016in eLife7.55
Eric T. Domyan7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UofU: University of Utah),
Zev N. Kronenberg13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UofU: University of Utah)
+ 11 AuthorsRobert B. Beckstead13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UGA: University of Georgia)
Birds display remarkable diversity in the distribution and morphology of scales and feathers on their feet, yet the genetic and developmental mechanisms governing this diversity remain unknown. Domestic pigeons have striking variation in foot feathering within a single species, providing a tractable model to investigate the molecular basis of skin appendage differences. We found that feathered feet in pigeons result from a partial transformation from hindlimb to forelimb identity mediated by cis...
Ping Wu23
Estimated H-index: 23
(SC: University of Southern California),
Chen Siang Ng9
Estimated H-index: 9
(AS: Academia Sinica)
+ 9 AuthorsRandall B. Widelitz40
Estimated H-index: 40
(SC: University of Southern California)
Avian integumentary organs include feathers, scales, claws, and beaks. They cover the body surface and play various functions to help adapt birds to diverse environments. These keratinized structures are mainly composed of corneous materials made of α-keratins, which exist in all vertebrates, and β-keratins, which only exist in birds and reptiles. Here, members of the keratin gene families were used to study how gene family evolution contributes to novelty and adaptation, focusing on tissue morp...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Current Biology9.19
Stephen L. Brusatte34
Estimated H-index: 34
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh),
Jingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Erich D. Jarvis51
Estimated H-index: 51
(Duke University)
Birds are one of the most recognizable and diverse groups of modern vertebrates. Over the past two decades, a wealth of new fossil discoveries and phylogenetic and macroevolutionary studies has transformed our understanding of how birds originated and became so successful. Birds evolved from theropod dinosaurs during the Jurassic (around 165–150 million years ago) and their classic small, lightweight, feathered, and winged body plan was pieced together gradually over tens of millions of years of...
Published on Jun 1, 2015in EMBO Reports8.38
Evelyn N. Kouwenhoven8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Martin Oti11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Radboud University Nijmegen)
+ 5 AuthorsHuiqing Zhou24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Radboud University Nijmegen)
The transcription factor p63 plays a pivotal role in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation in the epidermis. However, how p63 regulates epidermal genes during differentiation is not yet clear. Using epigenome profiling of differentiating human primary epidermal keratinocytes, we characterized a catalog of dynamically regulated genes and p63-bound regulatory elements that are relevant for epithelial development and related diseases. p63-bound regulatory elements occur as single or cluste...
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Evolution & Development1.82
Jacob M. Musser6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Yale University),
Günter P. Wagner61
Estimated H-index: 61
(Yale University),
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
SUMMARY Feathers are an evolutionary novelty found in all extant birds. Despite recent progress investigating feather development and a revolution in dinosaur paleontology, the relationship of feathers to other amniote skin appendages, particularly reptile scales, remains unclear. Disagreement arises primarily from the observation that feathers and avian scutate scales exhibit an anatomical placode—defined as an epidermal thickening—in early development, whereas alligator and other avian scales ...
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Evolution3.57
Walter S. Persons2
Estimated H-index: 2
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Philip J. Currie50
Estimated H-index: 50
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Over the course of the last two decades, the understanding of the early evolution of feathers in nonavian dinosaurs has been revolutionized. It is now recognized that early feathers had a simple form comparable in general structure to the hairs of mammals. Insight into the prevalence of simple feathers throughout the dinosaur family tree has gradually arisen in tandem with the growing evidence for endothermic dinosaur metabolisms. This has led to the generally accepted opinion that the early fea...
Published on Feb 16, 2015in Annual Review of Animal Biosciences5.20
Chih-Feng Chen15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NCHU: National Chung Hsing University),
John Foley19
Estimated H-index: 19
+ 5 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
(SC: University of Southern California)
The feather is a complex ectodermal organ with hierarchical branching patterns. It provides functions in endothermy, communication, and flight. Studies of feather growth, cycling, and health are of fundamental importance to avian biology and poultry science. In addition, feathers are an excellent model for morphogenesis studies because of their accessibility, and their distinct patterns can be used to assay the roles of specific molecular pathways. Here we review the progress in aspects of devel...
Cited By14
Newest
Published on Jan 30, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar12
Estimated H-index: 12
(KU: University of Kansas)
+ 3 AuthorsLuis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)
Over the last three years, Burmese amber (~99 Ma, from Myanmar) has provided a series of immature enantiornithine skeletal remains preserved in varying developmental stages and degrees of completeness. These specimens have improved our knowledge based on compression fossils in Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, adding details of three-dimensional structure and soft tissues that are rarely preserved elsewhere. Here we describe a remarkably well-preserved foot, accompanied by part of the wing plumage. ...
Published on Jul 11, 2019in bioRxiv
Lara Busby (University of Sheffield), Christina Aceituno (UC: University of Cantabria)+ 3 AuthorsMatthew Towers10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Sheffield)
Flight is a triumph of evolution that enabled the radiation and success of birds. A crucial step was the development of forelimb flight feathers that may have evolved for courtship or territorial displays in ancestral theropod dinosaurs. Classical tissue recombination experiments performed in the chick embryo provide evidence that signals operating during early limb development specify the position and identity of feathers. Here we show that a positional information gradient of Sonic hedgehog (S...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in New Phytologist7.30
Alexandru M. F. Tomescu13
Estimated H-index: 13
(HSU: Humboldt State University),
Andrew Groover22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
Published in Developmental Biology2.94
Elena F. Boer4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UofU: University of Utah),
Hannah F. Van Hollebeke1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UofU: University of Utah)
+ -3 AuthorsMichael D. Shapiro31
Estimated H-index: 31
(UofU: University of Utah)
Abstract The tetrapod limb is a stunning example of evolutionary diversity, with dramatic variation not only among distantly related species, but also between the serially homologous forelimbs (FLs) and hindlimbs (HLs) within species. Despite this variation, highly conserved genetic and developmental programs underlie limb development and identity in all tetrapods, raising the question of how limb diversification is generated from a conserved toolkit. In some breeds of domestic pigeon, shifts in...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces3.97
Guanquan Lin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering),
Hongjun Zhou3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 3 AuthorsXinhua Zhou3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Zhongkai University of Agriculture and Engineering)
Abstract In an effort to improve the utilization of pesticides, an environmentally friendly carrier material was prepared to encapsulate pesticides and to prevent pesticides from decomposing under natural conditions with sustained-release effect. The carrier of feather keratin-hyaluronic acid (FK-HA) was prepared by Maillard reaction. Using avermectin (AVM) as a model drug, AVM/FK-HA was obtained by heating. Its structure and morphology were measured by SDS-PAGE, Fourier-transform infrared spect...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports4.01
Ping Wu23
Estimated H-index: 23
(SC: University of Southern California),
Yung-Chih Lai4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SC: University of Southern California)
+ 1 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
(SC: University of Southern California)
Amniote skin appendages such as feathers, hairs and scales, provide thermoregulation, physical protection and display different color patterns to attract a mate or frighten an adversary. A long-standing question is whether “reptile scale” and “avian leg scales” are of the same origin. Understanding the relation between avian feathers, avian scales and reptilian scales will enhance our understanding of skin appendage evolution. We compared the molecular and cellular profiles in chicken feather, c...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in BMC Genomics3.50
Yung-Chih Lai4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SC: University of Southern California),
Ya-Chen Liang1
Estimated H-index: 1
(SC: University of Southern California)
+ 3 AuthorsCheng-Ming Chuong61
Estimated H-index: 61
Background The molecular mechanism controlling regional specific skin appendage phenotypes is a fundamental question that remains unresolved. We recently identified feather and scale primordium associated genes and with functional studies, proposed five major modules are involved in scale-to-feather conversion and their integration is essential to form today’s feathers. Yet, how the molecular networks are wired and integrated at the genomic level is still unknown.
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Genome Biology and Evolution3.73
Chen Siang Ng9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NTHU: National Tsing Hua University),
Wen-Hsiung Li94
Estimated H-index: 94
(U of C: University of Chicago)
Published on Aug 2, 2018in eLife7.55
Hannah Brunsdon1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh),
E. Elizabeth Patton2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh)