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The dimensions and mechanisms of mindfulness in regulating aggressive behaviors.

Published on Nov 20, 2017in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
· DOI :10.1037/apl0000283
Lindie H. Liang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University),
Douglas J. Brown29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UW: University of Waterloo)
+ 3 AuthorsLisa M. Keeping14
Estimated H-index: 14
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)
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Abstract
On the basis of the notion that the ability to exert self-control is critical to the regulation of aggressive behaviors, we suggest that mindfulness, an aspect of the self-control process, plays a key role in curbing workplace aggression. In particular, we note the conceptual and empirical distinctions between dimensions of mindfulness (i.e., mindful awareness and mindful acceptance) and investigate their respective abilities to regulate workplace aggression. In an experimental study (Study 1), a multiwave field study (Study 2a), and a daily diary study (Study 2b), we established that the awareness dimension, rather than the acceptance dimension, of mindfulness plays a more critical role in attenuating the association between hostility and aggression. In a second multiwave field study (Study 3), we found that mindful awareness moderates the association between hostility and aggression by reducing the extent to which individuals use dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies (i.e., surface acting), rather than by reducing the extent to which individuals engage in dysfunctional thought processes (i.e., rumination). The findings are discussed in terms of the implications of differentiating the dimensions and mechanisms of mindfulness for regulating workplace aggression. (PsycINFO Database Record
  • References (82)
  • Citations (2)
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References82
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2017in The Academy of Management Annals12.29
Huiwen Lian11
Estimated H-index: 11
(HKUST: Hong Kong University of Science and Technology),
Kai Chi Yam11
Estimated H-index: 11
(NUS: National University of Singapore)
+ 1 AuthorsDouglas J. Brown29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UW: University of Waterloo)
Self-control is an important component of organizational life, with organizational members constantly needing to exert self-control to overcome their desires and achieve long-term goals. Attesting to this importance, much research has focused on why individuals lose self-control and the consequences of self-control failure for individuals and organizations. Unfortunately, this research has overly focused on one component of self-control - resource depletion perspectives (and ego depletion perspe...
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Personality and Social Psychology Review9.90
Daniel R. Evans13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Brown University),
Ian A. Boggero7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UK: University of Kentucky),
Suzanne C. Segerstrom38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UK: University of Kentucky)
Self-regulation requires overriding a dominant response and leads to temporary self-regulatory fatigue. Existing theories of the nature and causes of self-regulatory fatigue highlight physiological substrates such as glucose, or psychological processes such as motivation, but these explanations are incomplete on their own. Historically, theories of physical fatigue demonstrate a similar pattern of useful but incomplete explanations, as recent views of physical fatigue emphasize the roles of both...
Published on Aug 1, 2016in Academy of Management Journal7.19
Lindie H. Liang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UW: University of Waterloo),
Huiwen Lian11
Estimated H-index: 11
(HKUST: Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)
+ 3 AuthorsLisa M. Keeping14
Estimated H-index: 14
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)
Building on prior work which has shown that abusive supervision is a reaction to subordinates’ poor performance, we develop a self-control framework to outline when and why supervisors abuse poor-performing subordinates. In particular, we argue that poor-performing subordinates instill in supervisors a sense of hostility toward the subordinate, which in turn leads to engaging in abusive supervision. Within this self-control framework, poor performance is more likely to lead to abusive supervisio...
Published on Mar 21, 2016
Kathleen M. Sutcliffe42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Johns Hopkins University),
Timothy J. Vogus19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University),
Erik Dane12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Rice University)
In recent years, research on mindfulness has grown rapidly in organizational psychology and organizational behavior. Specifically, two bodies of research have emerged: One focuses on the intrapsychic processes of individual mindfulness and the other on the social processes of collective mindfulness. In this review we provide a pioneering, cross-level review of mindfulness in organizations and find that mindfulness is neither mysterious nor mystical, but rather can be reliably and validly measure...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Psychology of Violence2.77
Randy J. McCarthy9
Estimated H-index: 9
(NIU: Northern Illinois University),
Julie L. Crouch15
Estimated H-index: 15
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
+ 2 AuthorsJohn J. Skowronski35
Estimated H-index: 35
(NIU: Northern Illinois University)
OBJECTIVE: Six studies (N = 1,081 general population parents) assessed the validity of the voodoo doll task (VDT) as a proxy for aggressive parenting behaviors. METHOD: Participants were given an opportunity to symbolically inflict harm by choosing to stick "pins" into a doll representing their child. RESULTS: Individual differences in parents' trait aggression (Studies 1, 2, and 6), state hostility (Study 3), attitudes toward the corporal punishment of children (Study 4), self-control (Study 6)...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Kai Chi Yam11
Estimated H-index: 11
(NUS: National University of Singapore),
Ryan Fehr12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UW: University of Washington)
+ 2 AuthorsScott J. Reynolds16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UW: University of Washington)
In this study, we examined how leaders' customer interactions influence their tendency to abuse their followers. Specifically, we drew from ego-depletion theory to suggest that surface acting during customer interactions depletes leaders of their self-control resources, resulting in elevated levels of abusive supervision. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the effect of surface acting on abusive supervision is moderated by leaders' trait self-control, such that leaders with high trait self-contro...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Management9.06
Darren Good7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Pepperdine University),
Christopher Lyddy3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Case Western Reserve University)
+ 6 AuthorsSara W. Lazar25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Harvard University)
Mindfulness research activity is surging within organizational science. Emerging evidence across multiple fields suggests that mindfulness is fundamentally connected to many aspects of workplace functioning, but this knowledge base has not been systematically integrated to date. This review coalesces the burgeoning body of mindfulness scholarship into a framework to guide mainstream management research investigating a broad range of constructs. The framework identifies how mindfulness influences...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Industrial and Organizational Psychology5.25
Patrick K. Hyland2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
R. Andrew Lee1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Maura J. Mills11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Hofstra University)
In recent years the concept of mindfulness has become increasingly popular, and with good reason. A growing body of research indicates that mindfulness provides a number of physical, psychological, and even performance benefits. As a result, some organizations have started offering mindfulness programs to their employees. But despite growing interest, mindfulness has received little attention from the industrial–organizational community. In this article, we provide an overview of what mindfulnes...
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Journal of Clinical Psychology2.06
Jessica R. Peters15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UK: University of Kentucky),
Laura M. Smart5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UK: University of Kentucky)
+ 3 AuthorsRuth A. Baer43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UK: University of Kentucky)
OBJECTIVES: Mindfulness training reduces anger and aggression, but the mechanisms of these effects are unclear. Mindfulness may reduce anger expression and hostility via reductions in anger rumination, a process of thinking repetitively about angry episodes that increases anger. Previous research supports this theory but used measures of general rumination and assessed only the present-centered awareness component of mindfulness. The present study investigated associations between various aspect...
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Perspectives on Psychological Science8.19
Hiroki P. Kotabe6
Estimated H-index: 6
(U of C: University of Chicago),
Wilhelm Hofmann37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Cologne)
As the science of self-control matures, the organization and integration of its key concepts becomes increasingly important. In response, we identified seven major components or “nodes” in current theories and research bearing on self-control: desire, higher order goal, desire–goal conflict, control motivation, control capacity, control effort, and enactment constraints. To unify these diverse and interdisciplinary areas of research, we formulated the interplay of these components in an integrat...
Cited By2
Newest
Sarah Lange1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Technical University of Dortmund),
Jens Rowold20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Technical University of Dortmund)
In times of tremendous organizational changes in the light of “Industry & Work 4.0” it is crucial to support leaders in regard to stress management and leadership effectiveness. Based on previous findings of mindfulness-based stress reduction and trait mindfulness affecting leadership quality, we developed a specific mindfulness-based leader intervention, which has been evaluated in regard to leaders’ stress and mindfulness as well as their leadership behaviors (Transformational & Destructive Le...
Anna Gillions (Coventry University), Rachael Cheang (Coventry University), Rui V. Duarte13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Liverpool)
Abstract Violence and aggression represent a serious problem, with significant cost and impact at individual and societal level. There has been increasing interest in the potential of mindfulness interventions to decrease levels of violence and aggression. This paper systematically reviews the evidence to assess the effectiveness of mindfulness interventions for the reduction of violence and aggression levels. Five electronic databases were searched, and methods followed published guidance for s...
Published on Aug 29, 2018in Work & Stress2.68
Evelyne Fouquereau14
Estimated H-index: 14
(François Rabelais University),
A.J.S. Morin8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Concordia University)
+ 2 AuthorsNicolas Gillet16
Estimated H-index: 16
(François Rabelais University)
ABSTRACTThe present study examines how three emotional labour strategies (hiding feelings, faking emotions, and deep acting) combine within different profiles of workers among two samples character...
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Tourism Management Perspectives
Chi-Min Wu (CNU: Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science), Tso-Jen Chen (Tainan University of Technology)
Abstract Drawing from social learning theory and the conservation of resources theory, this study examines the relationships between authentic leadership, collective mindfulness, collective thriving, and prosociality in hotel workplaces. Data from 86 hotel units with a total of 354 full-time frontline employees were used to test the research hypotheses via structural equation modeling. As anticipated, statistical results revealed that authentic leadership is positively related to collective mind...
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Leadership Quarterly5.63
Lindie H. Liang4
Estimated H-index: 4
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University),
Douglas J. Brown29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UW: University of Waterloo)
+ 3 AuthorsLisa M. Keeping14
Estimated H-index: 14
(WLU: Wilfrid Laurier University)
Abstract When a subordinate receives abusive treatment from a supervisor, a natural response is to retaliate against the supervisor. Although retaliation is dysfunctional and should be discouraged, we examine the potential functional role retaliation plays in terms of alleviating the negative consequences of abusive supervision on subordinate justice perceptions. Based on the notion that retaliation following mistreatment can restore justice for victims, we propose a model whereby retaliation fo...
Andrew C. Hafenbrack7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UW: University of Washington),
Lindsey Cameron (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)+ -3 AuthorsSamah Shaffakat (LJMU: Liverpool John Moores University)
Abstract The present research tested whether mindfulness, a state characterized by focused, nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment, increases prosocial behavior in the workplace or work-related contexts. Study 1a was a longitudinal field experiment at a US insurance company. Compared to workers under waitlist control, employees who were assigned to a daily mindfulness training reported more helping behaviors over a five day period both in quantitative surveys and qualitative daily diaries...