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Effects of changing climate on European stream invertebrate communities: a long-term data analysis

Published on Apr 1, 2018in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
· DOI :10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.242
Jonas Jourdan7
Estimated H-index: 7
(American Museum of Natural History),
Robert B. O'Hara5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
+ 12 AuthorsPeter Haase32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
Abstract
Abstract Long-term observations on riverine benthic invertebrate communities enable assessments of the potential impacts of global change on stream ecosystems. Besides increasing average temperatures, many studies predict greater temperature extremes and intense precipitation events as a consequence of climate change. In this study we examined long-term observation data (10–32 years) of 26 streams and rivers from four ecoregions in the European Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) network, to investigate invertebrate community responses to changing climatic conditions. We used functional trait and multi-taxonomic analyses and combined examinations of general long-term changes in communities with detailed analyses of the impact of different climatic drivers (i.e., various temperature and precipitation variables) by focusing on the response of communities to climatic conditions of the previous year. Taxa and ecoregions differed substantially in their response to climate change conditions. We did not observe any trend of changes in total taxonomic richness or overall abundance over time or with increasing temperatures, which reflects a compensatory turnover in the composition of communities; sensitive Plecoptera decreased in response to warmer years and Ephemeroptera increased in northern regions. Invasive species increased with an increasing number of extreme days which also caused an apparent upstream community movement. The observed changes in functional feeding group diversity indicate that climate change may be associated with changes in trophic interactions within aquatic food webs. These findings highlight the vulnerability of riverine ecosystems to climate change and emphasize the need to further explore the interactive effects of climate change variables with other local stressors to develop appropriate conservation measures.
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  • Citations (12)
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References91
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Michael Mirtl14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ),
E. T. Borer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Minnesota)
+ 14 AuthorsHiroyuki Muraoka28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Gifu University)
Abstract Since its founding in 1993 the International Long-term Ecological Research Network (ILTER) has gone through pronounced development phases. The current network comprises 44 active member LTER networks representing 700 LTER Sites and ~ 80 LTSER Platforms across all continents, active in the fields of ecosystem, critical zone and socio-ecological research. The critical challenges and most important achievements of the initial phase have now become state-of-the-art in networking for excelle...
32 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Peter Haase32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Duisburg-Essen),
Jonathan D. Tonkin15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Oregon State University)
+ 13 AuthorsWilliam H. McDowell69
Estimated H-index: 69
(University of New Hampshire)
Abstract Global change effects on biodiversity and human wellbeing call for improved long-term environmental data as a basis for science, policy and decision making, including increased interoperability, multifunctionality, and harmonization. Based on the example of two global initiatives, the International Long-Term Ecological Research (ILTER) network and the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON), we propose merging the frameworks behind these initiatives, namel...
39 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Biological Reviews 11.70
Dirk S. Schmeller30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Toulouse),
Lauren Weatherdon10
Estimated H-index: 10
(World Conservation Monitoring Centre)
+ 12 AuthorsCorinne S. Martin5
Estimated H-index: 5
(World Conservation Monitoring Centre)
Key global indicators of biodiversity decline, such as the IUCN Red List Index and the Living Planet Index, have relatively long assessment intervals. This means they, due to their inherent structure, function as late-warning indicators that are retrospective, rather than prospective. These indicators are unquestionably important in providing information for biodiversity conservation, but the detection of early-warning signs of critical biodiversity change is also needed so that proactive manage...
22 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Nature Ecology and Evolution
Jonathan D. Tonkin15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Oregon State University),
David M. Merritt7
Estimated H-index: 7
(United States Forest Service)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid A. Lytle32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Oregon State University)
Riverine ecosystems are governed by patterns of temporal variation in river flows. This dynamism will change due to climate change and the near-ubiquitous human control of river flows globally, which may have severe effects on species distributions and interactions. We employed a combination of population modelling and network theory to explore the consequences of possible flow regime futures on riparian plant communities, including scenarios of increased drought, flooding and flow homogenizatio...
21 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Ecology Letters 9.14
Laura E. McMullen6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Oregon State University),
Patrick De Leenheer19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Oregon State University)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid A. Lytle32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Oregon State University)
Disturbances cause high mortality in populations while simultaneously enhancing population growth by improving habitats. These countervailing effects make it difficult to predict population dynamics following disturbance events. To address this challenge, we derived a novel form of the logistic growth equation that permits time-varying carrying capacity and growth rate. We combined this equation with concepts drawn from disturbance ecology to create a general model for population dynamics in dis...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 18, 2017in PLOS ONE 2.77
Caspar A. Hallmann7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Martin Sorg1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 9 AuthorsThomas Hörren1
Estimated H-index: 1
Global declines in insects have sparked wide interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. Loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardize ecosystem services. Our understanding of the extent and underlying causes of this decline is based on the abundance of single species or taxonomic groups only, rather than changes in insect biomass which is more relevant for ecological functioning. Here, we used a standardized pr...
234 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 11, 2017in Science 41.06
Günter Blöschl74
Estimated H-index: 74
(Vienna University of Technology),
Julia Hall9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Vienna University of Technology)
+ 43 AuthorsMarco Borga45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of Padua)
A warming climate is expected to have an impact on the magnitude and timing of river floods; however, no consistent large-scale climate change signal in observed flood magnitudes has been identified so far. We analyzed the timing of river floods in Europe over the past five decades, using a pan-European database from 4262 observational hydrometric stations, and found clear patterns of change in flood timing. Warmer temperatures have led to earlier spring snowmelt floods throughout northeastern E...
78 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Elisabeth Berger4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Goethe University Frankfurt),
Peter Haase32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
+ 3 AuthorsAndrea Sundermann19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Goethe University Frankfurt)
Abstract In 2015, over 90 percent of German rivers failed to reach a good ecological status as demanded by the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD). Deficits in water quality, mainly from diffuse pollution such as agricultural run-off, but also from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), have been suggested as important drivers of this decline in ecological quality. We modelled six macroinvertebrate based metrics indicating ecological quality for 184 streams in response to a) PCA-derived water quali...
18 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Ecological Applications 4.39
David A. Lytle32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Oregon State University),
David M. Merritt7
Estimated H-index: 7
(United States Forest Service)
+ 2 AuthorsLindsay V. Reynolds9
Estimated H-index: 9
(United States Forest Service)
Modeling riparian plant dynamics along rivers is complicated by the fact that plants have different edaphic and hydrologic requirements at different life stages. With intensifying human demands for water and continued human alteration of rivers, there is a growing need for predicting responses of vegetation to flow alteration, including responses related to climate change and river flow management. We developed a coupled structured population model that combines stage-specific responses of plant...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2017in Ecology 4.62
Jonathan D. Tonkin15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Oregon State University),
Michael T. Bogan6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Arizona)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid A. Lytle32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Oregon State University)
Temporal environmental fluctuations, such as seasonality, exert strong controls on biodiversity. While the effects of seasonality are well known, the predictability of fluctuations across years may influence seasonality in ways that are less well understood. The ability of a habitat to support unique, non-nested assemblages of species at different times of the year should depend on both seasonality (occurrence of events at specific periods of the year) and predictability (the reliability of even...
35 Citations Source Cite
Cited By12
Newest
Published on Oct 18, 2018in Environmental Reviews 3.33
Janne Alahuhta14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Oulu),
Tibor Erős18
Estimated H-index: 18
+ 3 AuthorsJani Heino9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Finnish Environment Institute)
In the era of the Anthropocene, environmental change is accelerating biodiversity loss across ecosystems on Earth, among which freshwaters are likely the most threatened. Different biodiversity facets in the freshwater realm suffer from various environmental changes that jeopardize the ecosystem functions and services important for humankind. In this work we examine how environmental changes (e.g., climate change, eutrophication, or invasive species) affect trait-based, functional, and phylogene...
Source Cite
Published on May 2, 2019in Ecohydrology 2.75
Rossa O'Briain2
Estimated H-index: 2
Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Biological Reviews 11.70
Jonas Jourdan7
Estimated H-index: 7
(American Museum of Natural History),
Martin Plath23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Northwest A&F University)
+ 11 AuthorsArmin W. Lorenz24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
Species reintroductions – the translocation of individuals to areas in which a species has been extirpated with the aim of re-establishing a self-sustaining population – have become a widespread practice in conservation biology. Reintroduction projects have tended to focus on terrestrial vertebrates and, to a lesser extent, fishes. Much less effort has been devoted to the reintroduction of invertebrates into restored freshwater habitats. Yet, reintroductions may improve restoration outcomes in r...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Simone Guareschi8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Murcia),
Paul J. Wood36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Loughborough University)
Abstract Freshwater ecosystems face many threats in the form of reduced water quantity, poor water quality and the loss of biodiversity. As a result, aquatic biomonitoring tools are required to enable the evaluation of these critical changes. Currently, macroinvertebrate-based indices are globally the most widely used biomonitoring tools in fluvial ecosystems. However, very little is known about the potential effects of changes in taxonomic understanding (updating of classification and nomenclat...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Freshwater Biology 3.77
William D. Bovill4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Barbara J. Downes3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Jill Lancaster33
Estimated H-index: 33
Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Yongjiu Cai12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jun Xu18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 2 AuthorsJani Heino46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Finnish Environment Institute)
Abstract Current understanding of different facets of beta diversity and their underlying determinants remains limited at broad scales in the freshwater realm. We examined the geographical patterns and spatial congruence of three beta diversity facets of freshwater molluscs across all of China, and evaluated the relative importance of environmental and spatial factors underlying the observed patterns. Taxonomic (β-TD), functional (β-FD) and phylogenetic (β-PD) beta diversity were calculated for ...
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Ecological Engineering 3.02
Jens Kiesel11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Kiel),
Andreas Gericke3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Leibniz Association)
+ 4 AuthorsNicola Fohrer32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Kiel)
Abstract Freshwater species are adapted to and depend on various discharge conditions, such as 32 indicators of hydrologic alteration (IHA). Knowing how these indicators will be altered under climate change is essential for predicting species response and to develop mitigation concepts. The simulation of IHA under climate change is subject to considerable uncertainties which should be considered to obtain credible and robust predictions. Therefore, we investigated the major uncertainties inheren...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Hendrik J. Krajenbrink (Loughborough University), M. Acreman28
Estimated H-index: 28
+ 3 AuthorsPaul J. Wood36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Loughborough University)
Abstract River impoundment by the construction of dams potentially modifies a wide range of abiotic and biotic factors in lotic ecosystems and is considered one of the most significant anthropogenic impacts on rivers globally. The past two decades have witnessed a growing body of research centred on quantifying the effects of river impoundment, with a focus on mitigating and managing the effects of individual large dams. This study presents a novel multi-scale comparison of paired downstream and...
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Published on Jun 1, 2018in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Michael Mirtl14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ),
E. T. Borer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Minnesota)
+ 14 AuthorsHiroyuki Muraoka28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Gifu University)
Abstract Since its founding in 1993 the International Long-term Ecological Research Network (ILTER) has gone through pronounced development phases. The current network comprises 44 active member LTER networks representing 700 LTER Sites and ~ 80 LTSER Platforms across all continents, active in the fields of ecosystem, critical zone and socio-ecological research. The critical challenges and most important achievements of the initial phase have now become state-of-the-art in networking for excelle...
32 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Tjaša Kogovšek7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Martin Vodopivec2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 2 AuthorsAlenka Malej21
Estimated H-index: 21
Abstract A prominent increase in the moon jellyfish (genus Aurelia ) populations has been observed since 1980 in two semi-enclosed temperate seas: the northern Adriatic Sea and the Inland Sea of Japan. Therefore, we reviewed long-term environmental and biotic data from the two Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites, along with the increase in the moon jellyfish occurrence to elucidate how these coastal seas shifted to the jellyfish-dominated ecosystems. The principal component analysis of at...
3 Citations Source Cite