Effects of changing climate on European stream invertebrate communities: a long-term data analysis

Published on Apr 1, 2018in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
· DOI :10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.11.242
Jonas Jourdan7
Estimated H-index: 7
(American Museum of Natural History),
Robert B. O'Hara4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology)
+ 12 AuthorsPeter Haase32
Estimated H-index: 32
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
Abstract
Abstract Long-term observations on riverine benthic invertebrate communities enable assessments of the potential impacts of global change on stream ecosystems. Besides increasing average temperatures, many studies predict greater temperature extremes and intense precipitation events as a consequence of climate change. In this study we examined long-term observation data (10–32 years) of 26 streams and rivers from four ecoregions in the European Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) network, to investigate invertebrate community responses to changing climatic conditions. We used functional trait and multi-taxonomic analyses and combined examinations of general long-term changes in communities with detailed analyses of the impact of different climatic drivers (i.e., various temperature and precipitation variables) by focusing on the response of communities to climatic conditions of the previous year. Taxa and ecoregions differed substantially in their response to climate change conditions. We did not observe any trend of changes in total taxonomic richness or overall abundance over time or with increasing temperatures, which reflects a compensatory turnover in the composition of communities; sensitive Plecoptera decreased in response to warmer years and Ephemeroptera increased in northern regions. Invasive species increased with an increasing number of extreme days which also caused an apparent upstream community movement. The observed changes in functional feeding group diversity indicate that climate change may be associated with changes in trophic interactions within aquatic food webs. These findings highlight the vulnerability of riverine ecosystems to climate change and emphasize the need to further explore the interactive effects of climate change variables with other local stressors to develop appropriate conservation measures.
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References91
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Moritz Leps4
Estimated H-index: 4
(American Museum of Natural History),
Jonathan D. Tonkin14
Estimated H-index: 14
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 2 AuthorsAndrea Sundermann19
Estimated H-index: 19
(American Museum of Natural History)
It is broadly acknowledged that freshwater ecosystems are affected by multiple stressors, but the relative importance of individual stressors in impairing riverine communities remains unclear. We investigated the impacts of multiple stressors, incorporating in-stream water quality, riparian and catchment land use and stream morphology, on riverine benthic invertebrate communities, while considering the spatial scales of factors and the heterogeneity of riverscapes. We performed a stepwise regres...
37 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2011in Journal of Ecology 5.17
Melinda D. Smith44
Estimated H-index: 44
Summary 1. Growing recognition of the importance of climate extremes as drivers of contemporary and future ecological dynamics has led to increasing interest in studying these locally and globally important phenomena. 2. Many ecological studies examining the impacts of what are deemed climate extremes, such as heat waves and severe drought, do not provide a definition of extremity, either from a statistical context based on the long-term climatic record or from the perspective of the response of...
311 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2011in Freshwater Biology 3.77
Sami Domisch10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Sonja C. Jähnig20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Peter Haase32
Estimated H-index: 32
Summary 1. Freshwater ecosystems will be profoundly affected by global climate change, especially those in mountainous areas, which are known to be particularly vulnerable to warming temperatures. We modelled impacts of climate change on the distribution ranges of 38 species of benthic stream macroinvertebrates from nine macroinvertebrate orders covering all river zones from the headwaters to large river reaches. 2. Species altitudinal shifts as well as range changes up to the year 2080 were sim...
80 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Global Ecology and Biogeography 5.96
Luz Boyero22
Estimated H-index: 22
(James Cook University),
Richard G. Pearson45
Estimated H-index: 45
(James Cook University)
+ 29 AuthorsRicardo J. Albariño15
Estimated H-index: 15
(National Scientific and Technical Research Council)
Aim We tested the hypothesis that shredder detritivores, a key trophic guild in stream ecosystems, are more diverse at higher latitudes, which has important ecological implications in the face of potential biodiversity losses that are expected as a result of climate change. We also explored the dependence of local shredder diversity on the regional species pool across latitudes, and examined the influence of environ- mental factors on shredder diversity. Location World-wide (156 sites from 17 reg...
71 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2012in Global Change Biology 9.00
James R. Thomson30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Monash University, Clayton campus),
Nick R. Bond30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Monash University, Clayton campus)
+ 4 AuthorsRalph Mac Nally43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Monash University, Clayton campus)
Aquatic biodiversity faces increasing threats from climate change, escalating exploitation of water and land use intensification. Loss of vegetation in catchments (= watersheds) has been identified as a substantial problem for many river basins, and there is an urgent need to better understand how climate change may interact with changes in catchment vegetation to influence the ecological condition of freshwater ecosystems. We used 20 years of biological monitoring data from Victoria, southeaste...
51 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2011in Biodiversity and Conservation 2.83
Jan Sauer3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Sami Domisch10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 1 AuthorsPeter Haase32
Estimated H-index: 32
Global climate change (GCC) is expected to lead to massive loss of global biodiversity in the alpine regions of mountain ranges. Studies on the potential effects of GCC on low mountain areas remain sparse, however, despite the high conservation value of these areas as biodiversity refugia. We chose a species distribution modeling approach to assess potential GCC impacts on the future distributions of montane freshwater invertebrates under two different greenhouse gas scenarios and three averaged...
41 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2013in Global Change Biology 9.00
Mathieu Floury3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Philippe Usseglio-Polatera29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Lorraine)
+ 2 AuthorsYves Souchon4
Estimated H-index: 4
Aquatic species living in running waters are widely acknowledged to be vulnerable to climate-induced, thermal and hydrological fluctuations. Climate changes can interact with other environmental changes to determine structural and functional attributes of communities. Although such complex interactions are most likely to occur in a multiplestressor context as frequently encountered in large rivers, they have received little attention in such ecosystems. In this study, we aimed at specifically ad...
54 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2004in Limnologica 1.81
Peter Haase32
Estimated H-index: 32
(American Museum of Natural History),
Susanne Lohse5
Estimated H-index: 5
(American Museum of Natural History)
+ 4 AuthorsDaniel Hering43
Estimated H-index: 43
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
Abstract In the past, no single standardised method for sampling and sorting benthic macroinvertebrates has been implemented in Germany. Therefore, we tested the suitability of two common sorting protocols, RIVPACS and AQEM/STAR, by taking samples with each protocol at 44 sampling sites. Our results reveal that different methods deliver slightly different assessment results. Moreover these two methods differ in costs. Although the AQEM/STAR protocol takes longer than the RIVPACS protocol, we fav...
99 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 12, 2010in Restoration Ecology 2.54
Peter Dolton42
Estimated H-index: 42
(University of Western Australia)
Global biodiversity hotspots contain exceptional concentrations of endemic species in areas of escalating habitat loss. However, most hotspots are geographically constrained and consequently vulnerable to climate change as there is limited ability for the movement of species to less hostile conditions. Predicted changes to rainfall and temperature will undoubtedly further impact on freshwater ecosystems in these hotspots. Southwestern Australia is a biodiversity hotspot and, as one of the first ...
82 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2002in Environmental Management 2.18
Stuart E. Bunn50
Estimated H-index: 50
(Cooperative Research Centre),
Angela H. Arthington44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Cooperative Research Centre)
The flow regime is regarded by many aquatic ecologists to be the key driver of river and floodplain wet- land ecosystems. We have focused this literature review around four key principles to highlight the important mech- anisms that link hydrology and aquatic biodiversity and to illustrate the consequent impacts of altered flow regimes: Firstly, flow is a major determinant of physical habitat in streams, which in turn is a major determinant of biotic com- position; Secondly, aquatic species have...
1,820 Citations Source Cite
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Cited By11
Published on May 1, 2018in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Michela Rogora23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Ludovico Frate9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Molise)
+ 35 AuthorsMichele Carbognani11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Parma)
Abstract Mountain ecosystems are sensitive and reliable indicators of climate change. Long-term studies may be extremely useful in assessing the responses of high-elevation ecosystems to climate change and other anthropogenic drivers from a broad ecological perspective. Mountain research sites within the LTER (Long-Term Ecological Research) network are representative of various types of ecosystems and span a wide bioclimatic and elevational range. Here, we present a synthesis and a review of the...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Tjaša Kogovšek5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Martin Vodopivec2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 2 AuthorsAlenka Malej20
Estimated H-index: 20
Abstract A prominent increase in the moon jellyfish (genus Aurelia ) populations has been observed since 1980 in two semi-enclosed temperate seas: the northern Adriatic Sea and the Inland Sea of Japan. Therefore, we reviewed long-term environmental and biotic data from the two Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites, along with the increase in the moon jellyfish occurrence to elucidate how these coastal seas shifted to the jellyfish-dominated ecosystems. The principal component analysis of at...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Michael Mirtl11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ),
E. T. Borer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Minnesota)
+ 14 AuthorsHiroyuki Muraoka27
Estimated H-index: 27
(Gifu University)
Abstract Since its founding in 1993 the International Long-term Ecological Research Network (ILTER) has gone through pronounced development phases. The current network comprises 44 active member LTER networks representing 700 LTER Sites and ~ 80 LTSER Platforms across all continents, active in the fields of ecosystem, critical zone and socio-ecological research. The critical challenges and most important achievements of the initial phase have now become state-of-the-art in networking for excelle...
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Published on Mar 1, 2018in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
Karan Kakouei3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Free University of Berlin),
Jens Kiesel11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Kiel)
+ 3 AuthorsJochem Kail17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 25, 2018in PeerJ 2.12
Jonathan D. Tonkin14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Oregon State University),
Russell G. Death32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Massey University)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid A. Lytle30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Oregon State University)
1. That biodiversity declines with latitude is well known, but whether a metacommunity process is behind this gradient has received limited attention. We tested the hypothesis that dispersal limitation is progressively replaced by mass effects with increasing latitude, along with a series of related hypotheses. 2. We explored these hypotheses by examining metacommunity structure in stream invertebrate metacommunities spanning the length of New Zealand9s two largest islands (~1300 km), further di...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Biological Reviews 11.70
Jonas Jourdan7
Estimated H-index: 7
(American Museum of Natural History),
Martin Plath23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Northwest A&F University)
+ 11 AuthorsArmin W. Lorenz23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Duisburg-Essen)
Species reintroductions – the translocation of individuals to areas in which a species has been extirpated with the aim of re-establishing a self-sustaining population – have become a widespread practice in conservation biology. Reintroduction projects have tended to focus on terrestrial vertebrates and, to a lesser extent, fishes. Much less effort has been devoted to the reintroduction of invertebrates into restored freshwater habitats. Yet, reintroductions may improve restoration outcomes in r...
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Hendrik J. Krajenbrink (Loughborough University), Mike Acreman25
Estimated H-index: 25
+ 3 AuthorsPaul J. Wood35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Loughborough University)
Abstract River impoundment by the construction of dams potentially modifies a wide range of abiotic and biotic factors in lotic ecosystems and is considered one of the most significant anthropogenic impacts on rivers globally. The past two decades have witnessed a growing body of research centred on quantifying the effects of river impoundment, with a focus on mitigating and managing the effects of individual large dams. This study presents a novel multi-scale comparison of paired downstream and...
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Ecological Engineering 3.02
Jens Kiesel11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Kiel),
Andreas Gericke3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Leibniz Association)
+ 4 AuthorsNicola Fohrer30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Kiel)
Abstract Freshwater species are adapted to and depend on various discharge conditions, such as 32 indicators of hydrologic alteration (IHA). Knowing how these indicators will be altered under climate change is essential for predicting species response and to develop mitigation concepts. The simulation of IHA under climate change is subject to considerable uncertainties which should be considered to obtain credible and robust predictions. Therefore, we investigated the major uncertainties inheren...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Yongjiu Cai11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jun Xu17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 2 AuthorsJani Heino46
Estimated H-index: 46
(Finnish Environment Institute)
Abstract Current understanding of different facets of beta diversity and their underlying determinants remains limited at broad scales in the freshwater realm. We examined the geographical patterns and spatial congruence of three beta diversity facets of freshwater molluscs across all of China, and evaluated the relative importance of environmental and spatial factors underlying the observed patterns. Taxonomic (β-TD), functional (β-FD) and phylogenetic (β-PD) beta diversity were calculated for ...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment 4.61
Simone Guareschi7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Murcia),
Paul J. Wood35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Loughborough University)
Abstract Freshwater ecosystems face many threats in the form of reduced water quantity, poor water quality and the loss of biodiversity. As a result, aquatic biomonitoring tools are required to enable the evaluation of these critical changes. Currently, macroinvertebrate-based indices are globally the most widely used biomonitoring tools in fluvial ecosystems. However, very little is known about the potential effects of changes in taxonomic understanding (updating of classification and nomenclat...
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