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Ticks parasitised feathered dinosaurs as revealed by Cretaceous amber assemblages

Published on Dec 1, 2017in Nature Communications 12.35
· DOI :10.1038/s41467-017-01550-z
Enrique Peñalver17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Instituto Geológico y Minero de España),
Antonio Arillo15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Complutense University of Madrid)
+ 5 AuthorsRicardo Pérez-de la Fuente10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Oxford)
Abstract
Ticks are currently among the most prevalent blood-feeding ectoparasites, but their feeding habits and hosts in deep time have long remained speculative. Here, we report direct and indirect evidence in 99 million-year-old Cretaceous amber showing that hard ticks and ticks of the extinct new family Deinocrotonidae fed on blood from feathered dinosaurs, non-avialan or avialan excluding crown-group birds. A †Cornupalpatum burmanicum hard tick is entangled in a pennaceous feather. Two deinocrotonids described as †Deinocroton draculi gen. et sp. nov. have specialised setae from dermestid beetle larvae (hastisetae) attached to their bodies, likely indicating cohabitation in a feathered dinosaur nest. A third conspecific specimen is blood-engorged, its anatomical features suggesting that deinocrotonids fed rapidly to engorgement and had multiple gonotrophic cycles. These findings provide insight into early tick evolution and ecology, and shed light on poorly known arthropod–vertebrate interactions and potential disease transmission during the Mesozoic.
  • References (44)
  • Citations (16)
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References44
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Gondwana Research 5.66
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingmai K. O'Connor22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 4 AuthorsMing Bai15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Burmese amber has recently provided some detailed glimpses of plumage, soft tissues, and osteology of juvenile enantiornithine birds, but these insights have been restricted to isolated wing apices. Here we describe nearly half of a hatchling individual, based on osteological and soft tissue data obtained from the skull, neck, feet, and wing, and identified as a member of the extinct avian clade Enantiornithes. Preserved soft tissue provides the unique opportunity to observe the externa...
19 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Parasitology 2.51
Lidia Chitimia-Dobler2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Bruno Cancian De Araujo1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsJason A. Dunlop10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Museum für Naturkunde)
Amblyomma birmitum sp. nov. is formally described as a new record from 99 Ma old Burmese amber from Myanmar. This confirms the presence of the extant hard tick genus Amblyomma C.L. Koch, 1844 (Ixodida: Ixodidae) in the Late Cretaceous. This discovery is placed in its wider context and some reports of fossil hard ticks, such as a Hyalomma C.L. Koch, 1844 in Eocene Baltic amber, are misidentifications. The genus Amblyomma belongs to the clade Metastriata, a group which probably also accommodates t...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 2, 2017in Nature Communications 12.35
Xing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
,
Philip J. Currie50
Estimated H-index: 50
+ 5 AuthorsCongyu Yu1
Estimated H-index: 1
Troodontids were theropod dinosaurs closely related to birds. Here, Xu and colleagues describe a new, feathered troodontid species, Jianianhualong tengi, dating from the Lower Cretaceous period in China that provides insight into troodontid mosaic evolution and paravian feathering.
13 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Journal of Medical Entomology 1.97
George Poinar26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Oregon State University)
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.25
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Alberta)
Summary In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1–3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4–10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, an...
32 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Nature Communications 12.35
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 10 AuthorsMartinGLockley38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Colorado Denver)
Our knowledge of Cretaceous plumage is limited by the fossil record itself: compression fossils surrounding skeletons lack the finest morphological details and seldom preserve visible traces of colour, while discoveries in amber have been disassociated from their source animals. Here we report the osteology, plumage and pterylosis of two exceptionally preserved theropod wings from Burmese amber, with vestiges of soft tissues. The extremely small size and osteological development of the wings, co...
23 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases 2.61
Ben J. Mans31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Pretoria),
Minique H. de Castro5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of South Africa)
+ 4 AuthorsAbdalla A. Latif16
Estimated H-index: 16
Ancestral reconstruction in its fullest sense aims to describe the complete evolutionary history of a lineage. This depends on accurate phylogenies and an understanding of the key characters of each parental lineage. An attempt is made to delineate our current knowledge with regard to the ancestral reconstruction of the tick (Ixodida) lineage. Tick characters may be assigned to Core of Life, Lineages of Life or Edges of Life phenomena depending on how far back these characters may be assigned in...
24 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Nature 41.58
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
,
Jacob S. Berv4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 4 AuthorsAlan R. Lemmon28
Estimated H-index: 28
Although reconstruction of the phylogeny of living birds has progressed tremendously in the last decade, the evolutionary history of Neoaves—a clade that encompasses nearly all living bird species—remains the greatest unresolved challenge in dinosaur systematics. Here we investigate avian phylogeny with an unprecedented scale of data: >390,000 bases of genomic sequence data from each of 198 species of living birds, representing all major avian lineages, and two crocodilian outgroups. Sequence da...
451 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases 2.61
Ben J. Mans31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Pretoria),
Daniel de Klerk6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 2 AuthorsAbdalla A. Latif16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Pretoria)
Abstract Nuclear ribosomal RNA (18S and 28S rRNA) and mitochondrial genomes are commonly used in tick systematics. The ability to retrieve these markers using next-generation sequencing was investigated using the tick Nuttalliella namaqua . Issues related to nuclear markers may be resolved using this approach, notably, the monotypic status of N. namaqua and its basal relationship to other tick families. Four different Illumina datasets (∼55 million, 100 bp reads each) were generated from a singl...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Cretaceous Research 1.93
George Poinar26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Oregon State University)
Abstract Rickettsial-like cells are reported from the body cavity of the Myanmar amber larval tick, Cornupalpatum burmanicum (Ixodida: Ixodidae). These cells are characterized and described in a new collective fossil genus erected for putative rickettsia in fossil ticks. The size and shape of the fossil cells resemble those of present day members of the Rickettsiaceae, many of which occur in the body cavity of present day ticks.
8 Citations Source Cite
Cited By16
Newest
Published on May 15, 2019in Experimental and Applied Acarology 1.93
Mackenzie L. Kwak3
Estimated H-index: 3
(National University of Singapore),
Maosheng Foo (National University of Singapore)+ 5 AuthorsMuhammad Ghufran Tahir (National Parks Board)
Interactions between ticks and crocodilians (crocodiles, alligators, caiman, and gharials) are poorly studied but may have significant bearing on the ecology and health of these reptiles. The first record of tick infestation of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) is reported along with the first case of infestation by Amblyomma cordiferum on Cuvier’s dwarf caiman (Paleosuchus palpebrosus). A review is also provided of tick-crocodilian interactions with a concise host-parasite index.
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Published on Mar 20, 2019in Healthcare
John D. Scott11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Kerry L. Clark15
Estimated H-index: 15
,
Lance A. Durden32
Estimated H-index: 32
Wild birds transport ticks into Canada that harbor a diversity of zoonotic pathogens. However, medical practitioners often question how these zoonotic pathogens are present in their locality. In this study, we provide the first report of an Amblyomma inornatum tick cofeeding with a blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, which parasitized a Veery, Catharus fuscescens—a neotropical songbird. Using the flagellin (flaB) gene of the Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, and the 18S r...
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Published on Mar 1, 2019in Medecine Et Maladies Infectieuses 1.31
Nathalie Boulanger10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Strasbourg),
Pierre H. Boyer2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Strasbourg)
+ 1 AuthorsY. Hansmann22
Estimated H-index: 22
Abstract Ticks are a major group of arthropod vectors, characterized by the diversity of pathogens they transmit, by their impact on human and animal health, and by their socioeconomic implication especially in countries of the Southern Hemisphere. In Europe, Ixodes is the most important tick due to its wide distribution in the ecosystems and the variety of transmitted pathogens, in particular Borrelia (responsible for Lyme borreliosis), but also the tick-borne encephalitis virus. Their increase...
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Published on Jan 24, 2019in ZooKeys 1.08
Frédéric Beaulieu6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Wayne Knee4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 11 AuthorsHeather C. Proctor21
Estimated H-index: 21
Summaries of taxonomic knowledge are provided for all acarine groups in Canada, accompanied by references to relevant publications, changes in classification at the family level since 1979, and notes on biology relevant to estimating their diversity. Nearly 3000 described species from 269 families are recorded in the country, representing a 56% increase from the 1917 species reported by Lindquist et al. (1979). An additional 42 families are known from Canada only from material identified to fami...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases 2.61
Ben J. Mans31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of South Africa),
Jonathan Featherston5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 16 AuthorsPete D. Teel18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Texas A&M University)
Abstract The systematics of the genera and subgenera within the soft tick family Argasidae is not adequately resolved. Different classification schemes, reflecting diverse schools of scientific thought that elevated or downgraded groups to genera or subgenera, have been proposed. In the most recent classification scheme, Argas and Ornithodoros are paraphyletic and the placement of various subgenera remains uncertain because molecular data are lacking. Thus, reclassification of the Argasidae is r...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Journal of Palaeogeography
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Pierre F.D. Cockx1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Regina)
+ 1 AuthorsJingmai K. O’Connor9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Over the last 20 years, compression fossils of feathers surrounding dinosaurs have greatly expanded our understanding of the origin and evolution of feathers. One of the most peculiar feather morphotypes discovered to date are rachis dominated feathers (RDFs), which have also been referred to as proximally ribbon-like pennaceous feathers (PRPFs). These elongate feathers are only found in the tail plumage, typically occurring in pairs with both streamer (not proximally ribbon-like) and racket-plu...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Trends in Parasitology 7.93
Filipe Dantas-Torres4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Oswaldo Cruz Foundation)
Since ancient times, philosophers and taxonomists have tried to classify forms of life. This is what taxonomy is about: the science of identifying, naming, classifying, and describing organisms. In this article I address the issue of the species concept in tick taxonomy. While the typological species concept is still the most widely used, the biological and phylogenetic species concepts are growing in popularity among tick taxonomists. The integrative approach is increasingly being used, but the...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 17, 2018in International Journal of Acarology 1.01
Ekaterina A. Sidorchuk9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Russian Academy of Sciences)
ABSTRACTSmallness being in the essence of a mite, the question is whether it has always been so during the geological history of Acari. Here I assemble measurements of over 260 published mite fossils, distributed from the Early Devonian (410 mya) to the end of the Neogene (5 mya), and compare them to the data available for their extant relatives. A number of fossils are reconsidered: reports of the Ordovician Brachypylina and Permian Astigmata have to be excluded from the fossil record; Jurassic...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 7, 2018in Historical Biology 1.25
George Poinar26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Oregon State University)
ABSTRACTThe present work reviews the topic of ancient vertebrate pathogens that have been discovered associated with arthropods in Tertiary and Cretaceous amber. The great majority of these pathogens have been recorded inside the alimentary tract or body cavity of their vectors. Microorganisms resembling those that cause malaria, Lyme disease and plague, as well as many other diseases, provide evidence of the antiquity of pathogens that infect us today.
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Published on Nov 1, 2018in Cretaceous Research 1.93
Ekaterina A. Sidorchuk9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Russian Academy of Sciences),
Alexander A. Khaustov1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract The oldest-known member of a small parasitic mite family Pterygosomatidae (Trombidiformes: Eleutherengona) was found in the Lower Cretaceous (Albian) amber locality of Archingeay-Les Nouillers in Charente-Maritime, France. The majority of the extant members of the family are obligate parasites of lizards, and only one genus of twelve, Pimeliaphilus Tragardh, 1905, is known to infest arthropods – kissing bugs, scorpions, beetles and cockroaches. The excellent preservation of the fossil, ...
1 Citations Source Cite