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Multiple dating and tectonic setting of the Early Cretaceous Xianglushan W deposit, Jiangxi Province, South China

Published on Nov 1, 2017in Ore Geology Reviews 3.39
· DOI :10.1016/j.oregeorev.2017.11.017
Pan Dai2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Jingwen Mao33
Estimated H-index: 33
+ 2 AuthorsXiaohong Luo3
Estimated H-index: 3
(NU: Northwestern University)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract The Xianglushan W deposit in northwestern Jiangxi Province, South China, is one of numerous large-size W deposits along the northern margin of the Jiangnan Massif. The deposit comprises lenticular and stratiform-like orebodies, mainly along the contact between argillaceous limestone of the Cambrian Yangliugang Formation and a biotite granite pluton. The mineralization is zoned from proximal W greisen within the cupolas of the biotite granite, through W skarn and sulfide-scheelite bands near the pluton, to distal quartz-sulfide ± scheelite veins. The granitic pluton and an aplitic dyke in the mining area contain zircon grains with U–Pb ages of 123.8 ± 0.8 Ma and 117.3 ± 1.7 Ma, respectively. Six molybdenite samples collected from skarn ores yielded a Re–Os weighted mean age of 125.5 ± 0.7 Ma, and muscovite separates from greisen ores yielded a 40 Ar/ 39 Ar plateau age of 122.8 ± 0.78 Ma. The molybdenite Re–Os and muscovite Ar–Ar ages are consistent with the zircon U–Pb age of the hosting granite. The Xianglushan deposit is formed by an Early Cretaceous W–dominated polymetallic ore-forming event in the Jiangnan porphyry–skarn W belt. Zircon from biotite granites in the Xianglushan deposit has negative e Hf (t) values, generally from − 5.7 to − 3.1, with corresponding two-stage Hf model ages of 1363–1218 Ma, reflecting derivation of magmas from a crustal source. Molybdenite has Re contents from 12.12 to 22.77 ppm, indicative of a mixed crustal-mantle source, but with a dominantly crustal component. A compilation of precise ages for magmatism and mineralization in the Jiangnan porphyry–skarn W belt shows that there are two stages of mineralization at 150–135 Ma and 130–120 Ma, respectively. Integrated with published data, our results suggest that the Xianglushan W deposit formed in an extensional tectonic setting during the Early Cretaceous.
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  • Citations (3)
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References80
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Mineralium Deposita 3.40
Shenghua Wu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingwen Mao33
Estimated H-index: 33
+ 2 AuthorsXudong Wang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NU: Northeastern University)
The Shizhuyuan polymetallic deposit is located in the central part of the Nanling region, southeastern China, and consists of proximal W–Sn–Mo–Bi skarns and greisens and distal Pb–Zn–Ag veins. The sulfides and sulfosalts in the distal veins formed in three distinct stages: (1) an early stage of pyrite and arsenopyrite, (2) a middle stage of sphalerite and chalcopyrite, and (3) a late stage of galena, Ag-, Sn-, and Bi-bearing sulfides and sulfosalts, and pyrrhotite. Combined sulfide and sulfosalt...
Published on Aug 1, 2017in Lithos 3.91
Jingwen Mao33
Estimated H-index: 33
,
Bikang Xiong2
Estimated H-index: 2
+ 5 AuthorsPan Dai1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract The Yangchuling W–Mo deposit, located in the Jiangnan porphyry–skarn (JNB) tungsten ore belt, is the first recognized typical porphyry W–Mo deposit in China in the 1980's. Stockworks and disseminated W–Mo mineralization occur in the roof pendant of a 0.3 km 2 monzogranitic porphyry stock that intruded into a granodiorite stock, hosted by Neoproterozoic phyllite and slate. LA-ICPMS zircon U–Pb analyses suggest that of the monzogranitic porphyry and granodiorite were formed at 143.8 ± 0.5...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Ore Geology Reviews 3.39
Xiaofei Pan2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Zengqian Hou26
Estimated H-index: 26
+ 6 AuthorsChuan Kang1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract The recently discovered Zhuxi W–Cu ore deposit is located within the Taqian–Fuchun Ore Belt in the southeastern edge of the Yangtze Block, South China. Its inferred tungsten resources, based on new exploration data, are more than 280 Mt by 2016. At least three paragenetic stages of skarn formation and ore deposition have been recognized: prograde skarn stage; retrograde stage; and hydrothermal sulfide stage. Secondly, greisenization, marmorization and hornfels formation are also observe...
Published on Jun 1, 2017in Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 2.76
Michel Faure54
Estimated H-index: 54
(University of Orléans),
Yan Chen37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University of Orléans)
+ 2 AuthorsZiqin Xu1
Estimated H-index: 1
Highlights: • The Neoproterozoic Jiangnan collision of Cathaysia and Yangtze is responsible for the formation of the South China Block (SCB) • During the Early Paleozoic, the SCB was welded to the North China block along the Qinling belt, and also experienced an intracontinental orogeny that partly reworked the Jiangnan belt. • During the Middle Triassic, the SCB was welded to Indochina, the Qinling belt was reworked by N-directed intracontinental subduction. • The Xuefengshan belt is also a Mid...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 2.76
Jin-Cheng Luo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Ruizhong Hu36
Estimated H-index: 36
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsYou-Wei Chen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The southeastern part of the Nanling metallogenic province, South China contains numerous economically important granite-hosted, hydrothermal vein-type uranium deposits. The Miao’ershan (MES) uranium ore field is one of the most important uranium sources in China, hosts the largest Chanziping carbonaceous-siliceous-pelitic rock-type uranium deposit and several representative granite-hosted uranium deposits. The geology and geochemistry of these deposits have been extensively studied. Ho...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 2.76
Ruizhong Hu36
Estimated H-index: 36
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Wei Terry Chen17
Estimated H-index: 17
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsMei-Fu Zhou69
Estimated H-index: 69
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
Abstract In South China, the Yangtze and Cathaysia blocks were welded together along the Jiangnan Fold Belt during Neoproterozoic time (∼830 Ma). Large-scale mineralization in these two blocks occurred from Proterozoic to Cenozoic, making the region one of the most important polymetallic metallogenic provinces in the world. Of particular importance are world-class deposits of iron-oxide copper gold (IOCG), sediment-hosted Mn-P-Al-(Ni, Mo, PGE), syenite-carbonatite-related REE, felsic intrusion-r...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 2.76
Wen Winston Zhao3
Estimated H-index: 3
(HKU: University of Hong Kong),
Mei-Fu Zhou69
Estimated H-index: 69
(HKU: University of Hong Kong)
+ 2 AuthorsJian-Feng Gao27
Estimated H-index: 27
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract South China hosts the most abundant and largest tungsten (W) deposits in the world, being a famous W metallogenic region. Located at the eastern part of the South China Block, which was formed by amalgamation of the Yangtze and Cathaysia Blocks during the Neoproterozoic, these W deposits were mainly formed during the Mesozoic. The W mineralization is dominanted by greisen, quartz-vein, skarn, and porphyry types, all of which are genetically related to the evolution of highly fractionate...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 2.76
Ruizhong Hu36
Estimated H-index: 36
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Shanling Fu2
Estimated H-index: 2
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 6 AuthorsJiafei Xiao1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The South China Craton was formed by amalgamation of the Yangtze and Cathaysia Blocks during the Neoproterozoic. During the Mesozoic, voluminous granitic plutons and associated W-Sn polymetallic deposits were formed in the Cathaysia Block. The giant South China low-temperature metallogenic domain (LTMD) includes an area of ∼500,000 km 2 in the Yangtze Block and is composed of the Chuan-Dian-Qian Pb-Zn, Youjiang Au-As-Sb-Hg and Xiangzhong Sb-Au metallogenic provinces. The Chuan-Dian-Qian...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Ore Geology Reviews 3.39
Shenghua Wu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(China University of Geosciences),
Jingwen Mao33
Estimated H-index: 33
+ 2 AuthorsBikang Xiong1
Estimated H-index: 1
(China University of Geosciences)
Abstract The recently discovered Longtougang skarn and hydrothermal vein Cu–Zn deposit is located in the North Wuyi area, southeastern China. The intrusions in the ore district comprise several small porphyritic biotite monzonite, porphyritic monzonite, and porphyritic granite plutons and dikes. The mineralization is zoned from a lower zone of Cu-rich veins and Cu–Zn skarns to an upper zone of banded Zn–Pb mineralization in massive epidote altered rocks. The deposit is associated with skarn, pot...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 2.76
Huaimin Xue1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Fang Ma1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PKU: Peking University),
Cao Guangyue1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract The Luzong volcanic basin has a unique tectonic background, being located at the northeastern margin of the Yangtze craton and the foreland of the Dabie–Sulu orogen, near the intersection of the renowned Tanlu and Yangtze River faults. The volcanic and subvolcanic rocks in the basin are characterized by high potassium contents and are rich in alkali elements, and belong to a typical shoshonite series. Geochemically, these rocks are depleted in high field strength elements such as Nb and...
Cited By3
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Ore Geology Reviews 3.39
Shenghua Wu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Jingwen Mao33
Estimated H-index: 33
+ 4 AuthorsWeidong Sun47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract Scheelite has been analyzed from the Shizhuyuan and the Xianglushan world-class W deposits from the Nanling W–Sn region and Jiangnan W belt, respectively. The Shizhuyuan deposit consists of proximal skarn and greisen W–Sn–Mo–Bi and distal Pb–Zn–Ag veins. The Xianglushan deposit, contains layer-like sulfide–scheelite and skarn W orebodies on granite cupolas overprinted by W greisen veins. Scheelite in skarn ores from the Shizhuyuan contains higher concentrations of Mo than those in the s...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Ore Geology Reviews 3.39
Lulu Yuan , Guoxiang Chi20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 6 AuthorsMingyue Hu
Abstract The Zhuxi W deposit in Jiangxi, South China, with a resource of 2.86 Mt W and an average grade of 0.54% WO 3 , is the largest W deposit in the world. The deposit occurs at the contact between a late Mesozoic granitic intrusion and Carboniferous – Permian carbonate rocks and Neoproterozoic metamorphic rocks. The ores are divided into three types: skarn ore (dominant), sulfide ore and greisen ore. Based on occurrences and petrographic relationships, scheelite (the dominant ore mineral) is...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Mineralium Deposita 3.40
Shiwei Song1
Estimated H-index: 1
(PKU: Peking University),
Jingwen Mao33
Estimated H-index: 33
(PKU: Peking University)
+ 5 AuthorsYongpeng Ouyang2
Estimated H-index: 2
The Zhuxi W (Cu) skarn deposit is the largest W deposit in the Jiangnan porphyry–skarn tungsten belt in South China, and is also among the largest deposit of this type in the world. Titanite is a common mineral in the Zhuxi deposit, and occurs in three textural settings: titanite I associated with retrograde-altered exoskarn with weak mineralization; titanite II in retrograde-altered endoskarn with disseminated Cu ore; and titanite III from altered granite with disseminated W ore. Here, we prese...
Published on Sep 29, 2018in Minerals 2.25
Wen-Feng Wei2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Chun-Kit Lai11
Estimated H-index: 11
+ 3 AuthorsLei Liu1
Estimated H-index: 1
The newly discovered Shimensi deposit is a super-large tungsten-copper (W–Cu) deposit with a metal reserve of 742.55 thousand tonnes (kt) W and 403.6 kt Cu. The orebodies are hosted in Mesozoic granites, which intruded the poorly documented Shimensi granodiorite belonging to the Jiuling batholith, the largest intrusion (outcrop > 2500 km2) in South China. Our new SHRIMP (Sensitive High Resolution Ion MicroProbe) zircon dating revealed that the granodiorite at Shimensi (ca. 830–827 Ma) was formed...