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Marked reduction in demographic rates and reduced fitness advantage for early breeding is not linked to reduced thermal matching of breeding time

Published on Dec 1, 2017in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
· DOI :10.1002/ece3.3603
Debora Arlt16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences),
Tomas Pärt40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Abstract
Warmer springs may cause animals to become mistimed if advances of spring timing, including available resources and of timing of breeding occur at different speed. We used thermal sums (cumulative sum of degree days) during spring to describe the thermal progression (timing) of spring and investigate its relationship to breeding phenology and demography of a long-distant migrant bird, the northern wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe L.). We first compare 20-year trends in spring timing, breeding time, selection for breeding time, and annual demographic rates. We then explicitly test whether annual variation in selection for breeding time and demographic rates associates with the degree of phenological matching between breeding time and thermal progression of spring. Both thermal progression of spring and breeding time of wheatears advanced in time during the study period. But despite breeding on average 7 days earlier with respect to date, wheatears bred about 4 days later with respect to thermal spring progression. Over the same time period, selection for breeding time changed from distinct within-season advantage of breeding early to no or very weak advantage. Furthermore, demographic rates (nest success, fledgling production, recruitment, adult survival) and nestling weight declined markedly by 16%–79%. Those temporal trends suggest that a reduced degree of phenological matching may affect within-season fitness advantage of early breeding and population demographic rates. In contrast, when we investigate links based on annual variation, we find no significant relationship between either demographic rates or fitness advantage of early breeding with annual variation in the degree of phenological matching. Our results show that corresponding temporal trends in phenological matching, selection for breeding time and demographic rates are inconclusive evidence for demographic effects of changed phenological matching. Instead, we suggest that the trends in selection for breeding time and demographic rates are due to a general deterioration of the breeding environment.
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  • Citations (2)
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References75
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Ecology 4.62
Blair P. Dudeck1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Western Ontario),
Michael Clinchy8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Western Ontario)
+ 1 AuthorsLiana Zanette23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Western Ontario)
Fear itself (perceived predation risk) can affect wildlife demography, but the cumulative impact of fear on population dynamics is not well understood. Parental care is arguably what most distinguishes birds and mammals from other taxa, yet only one experiment on wildlife has tested fear effects on parental food provisioning and the repercussions this has for the survival of dependent offspring, and only during early-stage care. We tested the effect of fear on late-stage parental care of mobile ...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 18, 2017in PLOS ONE 2.77
Caspar A. Hallmann7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Martin Sorg1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 9 AuthorsThomas Hörren1
Estimated H-index: 1
Global declines in insects have sparked wide interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. Loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardize ecosystem services. Our understanding of the extent and underlying causes of this decline is based on the abundance of single species or taxonomic groups only, rather than changes in insect biomass which is more relevant for ecological functioning. Here, we used a standardized pr...
234 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Ibis 2.23
John W. Mallord11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Royal Society for the Protection of Birds),
Christopher J. Orsman4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Royal Society for the Protection of Birds)
+ 3 AuthorsRichard D. Gregory39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Royal Society for the Protection of Birds)
Climate-driven shifts in prey phenology may lead to asynchrony with the timing of peak resource requirements of their predators, leading to a reduction in productivity and population declines. Migrant species that cannot adjust their arrival times may be particularly at risk, especially those that breed in seasonal environments and for which a temporarily super-abundant prey source is important, such as insectivorous passerine birds that take advantage of the seasonal flush of caterpillars to fe...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Ardea 0.95
H. Herman van Oosten2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Radboud University Nijmegen)
Scholars agree that changes in vegetation have been influencing population sizes of ground-foraging songbirds in Dutch dune grasslands. Due to a lack of knowledge concerning the breeding biology of these species, the mechanisms linking vegetation change and population development remain unclear. Here, I describe the breeding biology of three co-occurring insectivores in Dutch dune grasslands: Meadow Pipit Anthus pratensis, European Stonechat Saxicola torquatus and Northern Wheatear Oenanthe oena...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2016in Oikos 3.71
Nina K. Lany3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Dartmouth College),
Matthew P. Ayres42
Estimated H-index: 42
(Dartmouth College)
+ 3 AuthorsRichard T. Holmes58
Estimated H-index: 58
(Dartmouth College)
Phenological advances and trophic mismatches are frequently reported ecological consequences of climate warming. Trophic mismatches occur when phenological responses to environmental conditions differ among trophic levels such that the timing of resource demand by consumers becomes decoupled from supply. We used 25 years of demographic measurements of a migratory songbird (the black-throated blue warbler Setophaga caerulescens) to compare its breeding phenology to the phenology of both its cater...
13 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 7, 2015in PLOS Biology 9.16
Marcel E. Visser52
Estimated H-index: 52
,
Phillip Gienapp20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 4 AuthorsChristiaan Both37
Estimated H-index: 37
Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction inte...
49 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Animal Ecology 4.46
James R. Bell23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Rothamsted Research),
L. J. Alderson2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Rothamsted Research)
+ 7 AuthorsR. Harrington41
Estimated H-index: 41
(Rothamsted Research)
1. Aphids represent a significant challenge to food production. The Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS) runs a network of 12·2-m suction-traps throughout the year to collect migrating aphids. In 2014, the RIS celebrated its 50th anniversary. This paper marks that achievement with an extensive spatiotemporal analysis and the provision of the first British annotated checklist of aphids since 1964. 2. Our main aim was to elucidate mechanisms that advance aphid phenology under climate change and explain ...
40 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
Meit Öberg4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences),
Debora Arlt16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
+ 3 AuthorsMatthew Low17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Adverse weather conditions during parental care may have direct consequences for offspring production, but longer-term effects on juvenile and parental survival are less well known. We used long-term data on reproductive output, recruitment, and parental survival in northern wheatears (Oenanthe oenanthe) to investigate the effects of rainfall during parental care on fledging success, recruitment success (juvenile survival), and parental survival, and how these effects related to nestling age, br...
36 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Oikos 3.71
Jacob Johansson11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Lund University),
Nadiah P. Kristensen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Lund University)
+ 1 AuthorsNiclas Jonzén23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Lund University)
The timing of biological events (phenology) is an important aspect of both a species' life cycle and how it interacts with other species and its environment. Patterns of phenological change have been given much scientific attention, particularly recently in relation to climate change. For pairs of interacting species, if their rates of phenological change differ, then this may lead to asynchrony between them and disruption of their ecological interactions. However it is often difficult to interp...
26 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 25, 2014in Science 41.06
Rodolfo Dirzo51
Estimated H-index: 51
(Stanford University),
Hillary S. Young21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of California, Santa Barbara)
+ 3 AuthorsBen Collen37
Estimated H-index: 37
(University College London)
We live amid a global wave of anthropogenically driven biodiversity loss: species and population extirpations and, critically, declines in local species abundance. Particularly, human impacts on animal biodiversity are an under-recognized form of global environmental change. Among terrestrial vertebrates, 322 species have become extinct since 1500, and populations of the remaining species show 25% average decline in abundance. Invertebrate patterns are equally dire: 67% of monitored populations ...
851 Citations Source Cite
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Published on Apr 22, 2019in Nature Ecology and Evolution
Marcel E. Visser52
Estimated H-index: 52
,
Phillip Gienapp20
Estimated H-index: 20
Climate change has often led to unequal shifts in the seasonal timing (phenology) of interacting species, such as consumers and their resource, leading to phenological ‘mismatches’. Mismatches occur when the time at which a consumer species’s demands for a resource are high does not match with the period when this resource is abundant. Here, we review the evolutionary and population-level consequences of such mismatches and how these depend on other ecological factors, such as additional drivers...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Ecology and Evolution 2.34
Caylee A. Falvo (Colorado State University), David N. Koons22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Colorado State University),
Lise M. Aubry11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Colorado State University)
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