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Toward a methodical framework for comprehensively assessing forest multifunctionality

Published on Dec 1, 2017in Ecology and Evolution 2.42
· DOI :10.1002/ece3.3488
Stefan Trogisch9
Estimated H-index: 9
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg),
Andreas Schuldt17
Estimated H-index: 17
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
+ 47 AuthorsHelge Bruelheide38
Estimated H-index: 38
(MLU: Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
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Abstract
Biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) research has extended its scope from communities that are short-lived or reshape their structure annually to structurally complex forest ecosystems. The establishment of tree diversity experiments poses specific methodological challenges for assessing the multiple functions provided by forest ecosystems. In particular, methodological inconsistencies and nonstandardized protocols impede the analysis of multifunctionality within, and comparability across the increasing number of tree diversity experiments. By providing an overview on key methods currently applied in one of the largest forest biodiversity experiments, we show how methods differing in scale and simplicity can be combined to retrieve consistent data allowing novel insights into forest ecosystem functioning. Furthermore, we discuss and develop recommendations for the integration and transferability of diverse methodical approaches to present and future forest biodiversity experiments. We identified four principles that should guide basic decisions concerning method selection for tree diversity experiments and forest BEF research: (1) method selection should be directed toward maximizing data density to increase the number of measured variables in each plot. (2) Methods should cover all relevant scales of the experiment to consider scale dependencies of biodiversity effects. (3) The same variable should be evaluated with the same method across space and time for adequate larger-scale and longer-time data analysis and to reduce errors due to changing measurement protocols. (4) Standardized, practical and rapid methods for assessing biodiversity and ecosystem functions should be promoted to increase comparability among forest BEF experiments. We demonstrate that currently available methods provide us with a sophisticated toolbox to improve a synergistic understanding of forest multifunctionality. However, these methods require further adjustment to the specific requirements of structurally complex and long-lived forest ecosystems. By applying methods connecting relevant scales, trophic levels, and above- and belowground ecosystem compartments, knowledge gain from large tree diversity experiments can be optimized.
  • References (213)
  • Citations (4)
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References213
Newest
Published on Jul 16, 2017in Journal of Visualized Experiments 1.11
Lawrence G. Oates10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center),
Harry W. Read9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)
+ 3 AuthorsRandall D. Jackson22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center)
Microbial communities are important drivers and regulators of ecosystem processes. To understand how management of ecosystems may affect microbial communities, a relatively precise but effort-intensive technique to assay microbial community composition is phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. PLFA was developed to analyze phospholipid biomarkers, which can be used as indicators of microbial biomass and the composition of broad functional groups of fungi and bacteria. It has commonly been used...
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Ecology Letters 8.70
Andreas Fichtner11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Werner Härdtle30
Estimated H-index: 30
+ 3 AuthorsGoddert von Oheimb24
Estimated H-index: 24
(TUD: Dresden University of Technology)
Studies on tree communities have demonstrated that species diversity can enhance forest productivity, but the driving mechanisms at the local neighbourhood level remain poorly understood. Here, we use data from a large-scale biodiversity experiment with 24 subtropical tree species to show that neighbourhood tree species richness generally promotes individual tree productivity. We found that the underlying mechanisms depend on a focal tree's functional traits: For species with a conservative reso...
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Biogeochemistry 3.41
Zhiqin Pei3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ),
Katrin N. Leppert3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Freiburg)
+ 4 AuthorsJessica L. M. Gutknecht17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
Human activities affect both tree species composition and diversity in forested ecosystems. This in turn alters the species diversity of plant litter and litter quality, which may have cascading effects on soil microbial communities and their functions for decomposition and nutrient cycling. We tested microbial responses to litter species diversity in a leaf litter decomposition experiment including monocultures, 2-, and 4-species mixtures in the subtropical climate zone of southeastern China. S...
Published on May 1, 2017in Nature Ecology and Evolution
William R. Shoemaker4
Estimated H-index: 4
(IU: Indiana University Bloomington),
Kenneth J. Locey9
Estimated H-index: 9
(IU: Indiana University Bloomington),
Jay T. Lennon34
Estimated H-index: 34
(IU: Indiana University Bloomington)
Testing widely known biodiversity models on a dataset of >20,000 microbial community samples from a wide variety of ecosystems, the authors find that microbial abundance and diversity across scales is best predicted by a model of lognormal dynamics.
Published on May 1, 2017in Journal of Ecology 5.69
David I. Forrester31
Estimated H-index: 31
,
Adam Benneter6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 1 AuthorsJürgen Bauhus40
Estimated H-index: 40
Summary Promoting mixed-species forests is an important strategy for adaptation and risk reduction in the face of global change. Concurrently, a main challenge in ecology is to quantify the effects of species diversity on ecosystem functioning. In forests, the effects of individual tree species on ecosystem functions depend largely on their dimensions, which are commonly predicted using allometric equations. However, little is known about how diversity influences allometry or how to incorporate ...
Published on May 1, 2017in International Journal of Remote Sensing 2.49
Chiara Torresan6
Estimated H-index: 6
(National Research Council),
Andrea Berton5
Estimated H-index: 5
(National Research Council)
+ 7 AuthorsLuke Wallace12
Estimated H-index: 12
(RMIT: RMIT University)
Unfortunately, the fragmented regulations among EU countries, a result of the lack of common rules for operating UAVs in Europe, limit the chance to operate within Europe’s boundaries and prevent research mobility and exchange opportunities. Nevertheless, the applications of UAVs are expanding in different domains, and the use of UAVs in forestry will increase, possibly leading to a regular utilization for small-scale monitoring purposes in Europe when recent technologies i.e. hyperspectral imag...
Published on Apr 30, 2017in Iforest - Biogeosciences and Forestry 1.42
Matthias Kunz4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Carsten Hess4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 6 AuthorsG. von Oheimb3
Estimated H-index: 3
Abstract: Many analyses in ecology and forestry require wood volume estimates of trees. However, non-destructive measurements are not straightforward because trees are differing in their three-dimensional structures and shapes. In this paper we compared three methods (one voxel-based and two cylinder-based methods) for wood volume calculation of trees from point clouds obtained by terrestrial laser scanning. We analysed a total of 24 young trees, composed of four different species ranging betwee...
Published on Apr 19, 2017in Frontiers in Microbiology 4.26
Witoon Purahong13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ),
Katherina A. Pietsch6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Leipzig University)
+ 5 AuthorsTesfaye Wubet29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ)
The deadwood mycobiome, also known as wood-inhabiting fungi (WIF), are among the key players in wood decomposition, having a large impact on nutrient cycling in forest soils. However, our knowledge of WIF richness and distribution patterns in different forest biomes is limited. Here, we used pyrotag sequencing of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region to characterize the deadwood mycobiome of two tree species with greatly different wood characteristics (Schima superba and Pinus mas...
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Nature Ecology and Evolution
Laura Williams5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UMN: University of Minnesota),
Alain Paquette24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UQAM: Université du Québec à Montréal)
+ 2 AuthorsPeter B. Reich129
Estimated H-index: 129
A field study of young trees shows that complementarity among tree crowns in canopy space is a mechanism linking biodiversity with ecosystem productivity, and as such may contribute to diversity-enhanced productivity in forests.
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Ecology 4.29
Pascal A. Niklaus40
Estimated H-index: 40
(UZH: University of Zurich),
Martin Baruffol10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UZH: University of Zurich)
+ 2 AuthorsBernhard Schmid82
Estimated H-index: 82
(UZH: University of Zurich)
Most experimental biodiversity–ecosystem functioning research to date has addressed herbaceous plant communities. Comparably little is known about how forest communities will respond to species losses, despite their importance for global biogeochemical cycling. We studied tree species interactions in experimental subtropical tree communities with 33 distinct tree species mixtures and one, two, or four species. Plots were either exposed to natural light levels or shaded. Trees grew rapidly and we...
Cited By4
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Forest Ecology and Management 3.13
Zhengshan Song4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Steffen Seitz7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 5 AuthorsThomas Scholten31
Estimated H-index: 31
Abstract Biodiversity plays a crucial role in forest ecosystem sustainability. However, it is unclear how tree diversity and especially the relationship between diversity and ecosystem functioning affect soil erosion. Based on a forest biodiversity and ecosystem functioning experiment established in subtropical China (BEF China), we measured soil erosion at four tree species richness levels (monocultures, 8 tree species, 16 tree species and 24 species stands) during the rainy seasons from 2013 t...
Published on May 14, 2019in Ecology 4.29
Lionel R. Hertzog6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UGent: Ghent University),
Roschong Boonyarittichaikij2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UGent: Ghent University)
+ 11 AuthorsDries Bonte33
Estimated H-index: 33
(UGent: Ghent University)
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Methods in Ecology and Evolution 7.10
Michael Staab11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Freiburg),
Gesine Pufal7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Freiburg)
+ 1 AuthorsAlexandra-Maria Klein48
Estimated H-index: 48
(University of Freiburg)
Published on May 6, 2018in International Journal of Molecular Sciences 4.18
Kristian Peters2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Anja Worrich4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 29 AuthorsKai Dührkop8
Estimated H-index: 8
The relatively new research discipline of Eco-Metabolomics is the application of metabolomics techniques to ecology with the aim to characterise biochemical interactions of organisms across different spatial and temporal scales. Metabolomics is an untargeted biochemical approach to measure many thousands of metabolites in different species, including plants and animals. Changes in metabolite concentrations can provide mechanistic evidence for biochemical processes that are relevant at ecological...
Published on Mar 29, 2017in Biogeosciences 3.95
Steffen Seitz7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Tübingen),
Martin Nebel9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Bonn)
+ 7 AuthorsThomas Scholten31
Estimated H-index: 31
(University of Tübingen)
Abstract. This study investigated the development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts) in an early successional subtropical forest plantation and their impact on soil erosion. Within a biodiversity and ecosystem functioning experiment in southeast China (biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) China), the effect of these biocrusts on sediment delivery and runoff was assessed within micro-scale runoff plots under natural rainfall, and biocrust cover was surveyed over a 5-year period. Result...