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Medical Journals in the Age of Ubiquitous Social Media

Published on Jan 1, 2018in Journal of The American College of Radiology3.79
· DOI :10.1016/j.jacr.2017.09.036
N. Seth Trueger10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NU: Northwestern University)
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Abstract
Abstract Medical journals increasingly use social media to engage their audiences in a variety of ways, from simply broadcasting content via blogs, microblogs, and podcasts to more interactive methods such as Twitter chats and online journal clubs. Online discussion may increase readership and help improve peer review, for example, by providing postpublication peer review. Challenges remain, including the loss of nuance and context of shared work. Furthermore, uncertainty remains regarding how to assess the impact of journal social media outreach, abundant but unclear metrics, and the magnitude of benefit (if any), particularly given the substantial work required for substantive interactive engagement. Continued involvement and innovation from medical journals through social media offers potential in engaging journal audiences and improving knowledge translation.
  • References (17)
  • Citations (5)
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References17
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Journal of The American College of Radiology3.79
N. Seth Trueger10
Estimated H-index: 10
(NU: Northwestern University),
Andrew V. Bokarius4
Estimated H-index: 4
(U of C: University of Chicago)
+ 2 AuthorsBrent Thoma15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan)
Abstract Purpose The use of social media by health professionals and medical journals is increasing. The aim of this study was to compare online views of articles in press (AIPs) released by Annals of Emergency Medicine before and after a nine-person social media team started actively posting links to AIPs using their personal Twitter accounts. Methods An observational before-and-after study was conducted. Web traffic data for Annals were obtained from the publisher (Elsevier), detailing the num...
Published on Jul 1, 2017in World Neurosurgery1.72
Justin Wang5
Estimated H-index: 5
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Naif M. Alotaibi10
Estimated H-index: 10
(U of T: University of Toronto)
+ 2 AuthorsAndres M. Lozano102
Estimated H-index: 102
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Objective Social media are increasingly used for the dissemination of scientific publications by most medical journals. The role of social media in increasing awareness of published works in neurosurgery has not been previously explored. Here, we present a qualitative analysis of the highest trending works in neurosurgery along with a correlation analysis with their social media metrics. Methods We performed a comprehensive search for neurosurgical publications using the Altmetric database. The ...
Published on May 1, 2017in Journal of The American College of Radiology3.79
C. Matthew Hawkins12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Emory University),
Makeba Hunter1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American College of Radiology)
+ 1 AuthorsRuth C. Carlos36
Estimated H-index: 36
(UM: University of Michigan)
Abstract Objective To prospectively evaluate the impact of increasing levels of social media engagement on page visits and web-link clicks for content published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology . Methods A three-arm prospective trial was designed using a control group, a basic Twitter intervention group (using only the Journal's @JACRJournal Twitter account), and an enhanced Twitter intervention group (using the personal Twitter accounts of editorial board members and trainees...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Annals of Emergency Medicine5.21
Michelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco),
Nikita Joshi6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Stanford University)
+ 1 AuthorsTeresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(McMaster University)
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Annals of Emergency Medicine5.21
N. Seth Trueger10
Estimated H-index: 10
(U of C: University of Chicago)
Published on May 1, 2016in Journal of the American Heart Association4.66
Caroline S. Fox124
Estimated H-index: 124
,
Ellen B. Gurary4
Estimated H-index: 4
(BU: Boston University)
+ 4 AuthorsJoseph M. Massaro80
Estimated H-index: 80
(BU: Boston University)
Background A prior randomized controlled trial of social media exposure at Circulation determined that social media did not increase 30‐day page views. Whether insufficient social media intensity contributed to these results is uncertain. Methods and Results Original article manuscripts were randomized to social media exposure compared with no social media exposure (control) at Circulation beginning in January 2015. Social media exposure consisted of Facebook and Twitter posts on the journal's a...
Published on Nov 2, 2015in Accountability in Research
Ashutosh S. Jogalekar1
Estimated H-index: 1
Over the last two decades, various themes inherent in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) in chemistry have been brought to light through prominent cases of research misconduct. This article will describe a few of these cases especially through the lens of social media such as blogs and Twitter. A case will be made that these wholly novel modalities of online discussion are now complementing, and in some cases even circumventing some of the limitations of traditional peer review in chemist...
Published on May 1, 2015in Annals of Emergency Medicine5.21
Bryan D. Hayes13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Maryland Medical Center),
Scott Kobner2
Estimated H-index: 2
(NYU: New York University)
+ 2 AuthorsMichelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
In July to August 2014, Annals of Emergency Medicine continued a collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host an online discussion session featuring the 2014 Annals Residents' Perspective article "Integration of Social Media in Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum" by Scott et al. The objective was to describe a 14-day worldwide clinician dialogue about evidence, opinions, and early relevant innovations revolving around the featured article and...
Published on Jan 6, 2015in Circulation23.05
Caroline S. Fox124
Estimated H-index: 124
,
Marc A. Bonaca3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Brigham and Women's Hospital)
+ 3 AuthorsJoseph Loscalzo106
Estimated H-index: 106
(Brigham and Women's Hospital)
Background—Medical journals use social media to distribute the findings of published articles. Whether social media exposure to original articles improves article impact metrics is uncertain. Methods and Results—Articles were randomized to receive targeted social media exposure from Circulation, including postings on the journal’s Facebook and Twitter feeds. The primary end point was 30-day article page views. We conducted an intention-to-treat analysis comparing article page views by the Wilcox...
Published on Nov 1, 2014in Journal of The American College of Radiology3.79
C. Matthew Hawkins12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UW: University of Washington),
Bruce J. Hillman19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UVA: University of Virginia)
+ 3 AuthorsRichard Duszak21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Emory University)
Purpose Social media microblogging has made major inroads in physician education and information exchange. The authors evaluated their early experience with Twitter "tweet chat" sessions as a medium to expand the reach and audience of a peer-reviewed radiology journal. Methods The authors analyzed Twitter activity metadata tagged with the #JACR hashtag from the first 6 tweet chat sessions sponsored and promoted by JACR . The assessment included multiple metrics: radiologist versus nonradiologist...
Cited By5
Newest
Published on May 20, 2019in bioRxiv
Lauren A. Maggio10
Estimated H-index: 10
(USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences),
Todd C. Leroux (Defense Health Agency), Anthony R. Artino28
Estimated H-index: 28
(USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)
Many medical education journals use Twitter to garner attention for their articles. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of tweeting on article page views and downloads. The authors conducted a randomized trial using Academic Medicine articles published in 2015. Beginning in February through May 2018, one article per day was randomly assigned to a Twitter (case) or control group. Daily, an individual tweet was generated for each article in the Twitter group that included the title, ...
Published on May 1, 2019in Paediatric Respiratory Reviews2.62
David Isaacs35
Estimated H-index: 35
,
Chris Elliot + 1 AuthorsAnne Preisz
Abstract Ethics has been defined as the way we ought to behave. Medical publishing essentially exists to broadcast current and new medical knowledge to aid in the practice of medicine. In this review article we consider many of the aspects of medical publishing with regard to ‘what we ought to do’ and, equally, ‘what we ought not to do’ from the perspective of various ethical frameworks. Although ethics is not the law or a set of rules, nor a code of conduct, an ethical lens can be useful when d...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of the American College of Cardiology18.64
Purvi Parwani1
Estimated H-index: 1
(LLU: Loma Linda University),
Andrew D. Choi8
Estimated H-index: 8
(GW: George Washington University)
+ 7 AuthorsMartha Gulati24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UA: University of Arizona)
Abstract Cardiology professionals have used social media platforms such as Twitter to gain exposure to new research, network with experts, share opinions, and engage in scientific debates. The power of social media to communicate openly, with wide-reaching access worldwide, and at a rate faster than ever before makes it a formidable force and voice. However, evolving individual and institutional use has resulted in uncertainty for all parties on how to optimally advance this newer digital fronti...
Published on Nov 1, 2018in Neurogastroenterology and Motility3.80
Adam D. Farmer20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Keele University),
James K. Ruffle5
Estimated H-index: 5
(QMUL: Queen Mary University of London),
Maggy Barber
Published on Jan 1, 2018in Journal of The American College of Radiology3.79
C. Matthew Hawkins12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Emory University),
Ruth C. Carlos36
Estimated H-index: 36
(UM: University of Michigan)