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Real-time robustness evaluation of regression based myoelectric control against arm position change and donning/doffing

Published on Nov 2, 2017in PLOS ONE2.78
· DOI :10.1371/journal.pone.0186318
Han-Jeong Hwang14
Estimated H-index: 14
,
Janne M. Hahne7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Klaus-Robert Müller82
Estimated H-index: 82
Cite
  • References (48)
  • Citations (2)
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References48
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Scientific Reports4.01
Janne M. Hahne7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Marko Markovic10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Dario Farina70
Estimated H-index: 70
(Imperial College London)
State of the art clinical hand prostheses are controlled in a simple and limited way that allows the activation of one function at a time. More advanced laboratory approaches, based on machine learning, offer a significant increase in functionality, but their clinical impact is limited, mainly due to lack of reliability. In this study, we analyse two conceptually different machine learning approaches, focusing on their robustness and performance in a closed loop application. A classification (fi...
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation3.58
Adenike A. Adewuyi4
Estimated H-index: 4
(NU: Northwestern University),
Levi J. Hargrove29
Estimated H-index: 29
(NU: Northwestern University),
Todd A. Kuiken40
Estimated H-index: 40
Background The use of pattern recognition-based methods to control myoelectric upper-limb prostheses has been well studied in individuals with high-level amputations but few studies have demonstrated that it is suitable for partial-hand amputees, who often possess a functional wrist. This study’s objective was to evaluate strategies that allow partial-hand amputees to control a prosthetic hand while allowing retain wrist function.
David Hofmann2
Estimated H-index: 2
(MPG: Max Planck Society),
Ning Jiang27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UW: University of Waterloo)
+ 1 AuthorsDario Farina70
Estimated H-index: 70
(GAU: University of Göttingen)
European Research Council (ERC) [DEMOVE 267888]; Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) of Germany [01GQ0811]; New Faculty Startup Grant of the University of Waterloo
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Journal of Neural Engineering4.55
Gauravkumar K. Patel2
Estimated H-index: 2
(DLR: German Aerospace Center),
Strahinja Dosen17
Estimated H-index: 17
(GAU: University of Göttingen)
+ 1 AuthorsDario Farina70
Estimated H-index: 70
(GAU: University of Göttingen)
Objective. Closing the loop in myoelectric prostheses by providing artificial somatosensory feedback to the user is an important need for prosthetic users. Previous studies investigated feedback strategies in combination with the control of one degree of freedom of simple grippers. Modern hands, however, are sophisticated multifunction systems. In this study, we assessed multichannel electrotactile feedback integrated with an advanced method for the simultaneous and proportional control of indiv...
Marina M. C. Vidovic3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Technical University of Berlin),
Han-Jeong Hwang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Technical University of Berlin)
+ 3 AuthorsKlaus-Robert Müller82
Estimated H-index: 82
(Technical University of Berlin)
Fundamental changes over time of surface EMG signal characteristics are a challenge for myocontrol algorithms controlling prosthetic devices. These changes are generally caused by electrode shifts after donning and doffing, sweating, additional weight or varying arm positions, which results in a change of the signal distribution-a scenario often referred to as covariate shift. A substantial decrease in classification accuracy due to these factors hinders the possibility to directly translate EMG...
Adenike A. Adewuyi4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago),
Levi J. Hargrove29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago),
Todd A. Kuiken40
Estimated H-index: 40
(Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)
Pattern recognition control combined with surface electromyography (EMG) from the extrinsic hand muscles has shown great promise for control of multiple prosthetic functions for transradial amputees. There is, however, a need to adapt this control method when implemented for partial-hand amputees, who possess both a functional wrist and information-rich residual intrinsic hand muscles. We demonstrate that combining EMG data from both intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles to classify hand grasps a...
Published on Jan 1, 2016
Janne M. Hahne7
Estimated H-index: 7
Janne M. Hahne7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Sven Dähne16
Estimated H-index: 16
+ 2 AuthorsLucas C. Parra46
Estimated H-index: 46
(CCNY: City College of New York)
Myoelectric control of a prosthetic hand with more than one degree of freedom (DoF) is challenging, and clinically available techniques require a sequential actuation of the DoFs. Simultaneous and proportional control of multiple DoFs is possible with regression-based approaches allowing for fluent and natural movements. Conventionally, the regressor is calibrated in an open-loop with training based on recorded data and the performance is evaluated subsequently. For individuals with amputation o...
Ali Ameri4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UNB: University of New Brunswick),
Ernest Nlandu Kamavuako13
Estimated H-index: 13
(AAU: Aalborg University)
+ 2 AuthorsPhilip A. Parker22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UNB: University of New Brunswick)
This study describes the first application of a support vector machine (SVM) based scheme for real-time simultaneous and proportional myoelectric control of multiple degrees of freedom (DOFs). Three DOFs including wrist flexion–extension, abduction–adduction and forearm pronation–supination were investigated with 10 able-bodied subjects and two individuals with transradial limb deficiency (LD). A Fitts' law test involving real-time target acquisition tasks was conducted to compare the usability ...
Published on Oct 1, 2014in Journal of Neural Engineering4.55
Han-Jeong Hwang14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Technical University of Berlin),
Janne M. Hahne7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Technical University of Berlin),
Klaus-Robert Müller82
Estimated H-index: 82
Objective. Recent studies have shown the possibility of simultaneous and proportional control of electrically powered upper-limb prostheses, but there has been little investigation on optimal channel selection. The objective of this study is to find a robust channel selection method and the channel subsets most suitable for simultaneous and proportional myoelectric prosthesis control of multiple degrees-of-freedom (DoFs). Approach. Ten able-bodied subjects and one person with congenital upper-li...
Cited By2
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Ananya S. Dhawan (GMU: George Mason University), Biswarup Mukherjee3
Estimated H-index: 3
(GMU: George Mason University)
+ 7 AuthorsSiddhartha Sikdar16
Estimated H-index: 16
(GMU: George Mason University)
Technological advances in multi-articulated prosthetic hands have outpaced the development of methods to intuitively control these devices. In fact, prosthetic users often cite "difficulty of use" as a key contributing factor for abandoning their prostheses. To overcome the limitations of the currently pervasive myoelectric control strategies, namely unintuitive proportional control of multiple degrees-of-freedom, we propose a novel approach: proprioceptive sonomyographic control. Unlike myoelec...
Published on Jan 16, 2019in Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation3.58
Richard B. Woodward1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northwestern University),
Levi J. Hargrove29
Estimated H-index: 29
(NU: Northwestern University)
Background Pattern recognition technology allows for more intuitive control of myoelectric prostheses. However, the need to collect electromyographic data to initially train the pattern recognition system, and to re-train it during prosthesis use, adds complexity that can make using such a system difficult. Although experienced clinicians may be able to guide users to ensure successful data collection methods, they may not always be available when a user needs to (re)train their device.
Cosima Prahm4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Medical University of Vienna),
Alexander Schulz36
Estimated H-index: 36
+ 5 AuthorsOskar C. Aszmann24
Estimated H-index: 24
(Medical University of Vienna)
Research on machine learning approaches for upper-limb prosthesis control has shown impressive progress. However, translating these results from the lab to patient’s everyday lives remains a challenge because advanced control schemes tend to break down under everyday disturbances, such as electrode shifts. Recently, it has been suggested to apply adaptive transfer learning to counteract electrode shifts using as little newly recorded training data as possible. In this paper, we present a novel, ...
Published in bioRxiv
Ananya S. Dhawan (GMU: George Mason University), Biswarup Mukherjee3
Estimated H-index: 3
(GMU: George Mason University)
+ -3 AuthorsSiddhartha Sikdar16
Estimated H-index: 16
(GMU: George Mason University)
Technological advances in multi-articulated prosthetic hands have outpaced the methods available to amputees to intuitively control these devices. Amputees often cite difficulty of use as a key contributing factor for abandoning their prosthesis, creating a pressing need for improved control technology. A major challenge of traditional myoelectric control strategies using surface electromyography electrodes has been the difficulty in achieving intuitive and robust proportional control of multipl...
Published on Jul 1, 2018 in EMBC (International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society)
Richard B. Woodward1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NU: Northwestern University),
Levi J. Hargrove29
Estimated H-index: 29
Published on Jun 20, 2018
Janne M. Hahne7
Estimated H-index: 7
(GAU: University of Göttingen),
Meike A. Schweisfurth5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Hamburg University of Applied Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsDario Farina70
Estimated H-index: 70
(Imperial College London)
Myoelectric hand prostheses are usually controlled with two bipolar electrodes located on the flexor and extensor muscles of the residual limb. With clinically established techniques, only one function can be controlled at a time. This is cumbersome and limits the benefit of additional functions offered by modern prostheses. Extensive research has been conducted on more advanced control techniques, but the clinical impact has been limited, mainly due to the lack of reliability in real-world cond...