Match!

Inefficiency of evolutionarily relevant selection in ungulate trophy hunting

Published on Jan 1, 2018in Journal of Wildlife Management1.88
· DOI :10.1002/jwmg.21337
James R. Heffelfinger11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Arizona Game and Fish Department)
Abstract
Differentially harvesting individual animals with specific traits has led some to argue that such selection can cause evolutionary change that may be detrimental to the species, especially if those traits are related positively to individual fitness. Most hunters are not selective in the type of animal they take, satisfied instead to harvest any legal animal. In a few exceptions, however, regulations may limit hunters to harvest animals of a minimum size or age regardless of their personal choice. Using information from a broad range of aquatic and terrestrial systems exposed to a myriad of potential and operational selective pressures, several authors have made expansive generalizations about selective harvest and its applicability to ungulates. Harvest-based selection can potentially be intensive enough to be relevant in an evolutionary sense, but phenotypic changes consistent with hunter selection are otherwise confounded with multiple environmental influences. Factors such as age, genetic contribution of females, nutrition, maternal effects, epigenetics, patterns of mating success, gene linkage, gene flow, refugia, date of birth, and other factors affecting selection interact with harvest to impede unidirectional evolution of a trait. The intensity of selection determines potential for evolutionary change in a meaningful temporal framework. Indeed, only under severe intensity, and strict selection on a trait, could human harvest prompt evolutionary changes in that trait. Broad generalizations across populations or ecological systems can yield erroneous extrapolations and inappropriate assumptions. Removal of males expressing a variety of horn or antler sizes, including some very large males, does not inevitably represent directional artificial selection unless the selective pressures are intensive enough to cause a unidirectional shift in allele frequencies that may act on some relevant life-history trait or process. Here I review the topic of harvest-based selection in male ungulates and discuss the inefficiency of trophy hunting in changing genetic expression of phenotype. © 2017 The Wildlife Society.
  • References (90)
  • Citations (6)
References90
Newest
#1Kevin L. Monteith (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 16
#2Ryan A. Long (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 12
Last.Tayler N. Lasharr (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 1
view all 6 authors...
#1Jan Heuschele (University of Oslo)H-Index: 10
#2Mikael T. Ekvall (Lund University)H-Index: 7
Last.Christian Lindemann (University of Bergen)H-Index: 7
view all 4 authors...
#1Kostas A. Triantaphyllopoulos (AUA: Agricultural University of Athens)H-Index: 3
#2Ioannis Ikonomopoulos (AUA: Agricultural University of Athens)H-Index: 1
Last.Andrew J. Bannister (Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute)H-Index: 46
view all 3 authors...
#1Eric S. Michel (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 3
#2Stephen Demarais (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 23
Last.Chad M. DacusH-Index: 4
view all 5 authors...
#1Eric S. Michel (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 3
#2Emily B. Flinn (MSU: Mississippi State University)H-Index: 2
Last.Chad M. DacusH-Index: 4
view all 6 authors...
Cited By6
Newest
#1Tayler N. Lasharr (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 1
#2Ryan A. Long (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 12
Last.Michael CoxH-Index: 1
view all 11 authors...
#1Tayler N. Lasharr (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 1
#2Ryan A. Long (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 12
Last.Michael CoxH-Index: 1
view all 16 authors...
#1R. Terry Bowyer (UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)H-Index: 42
#2Mark S. Boyce (U of A: University of Alberta)H-Index: 68
Last.Janet L. Rachlow (UIdaho: University of Idaho)H-Index: 21
view all 4 authors...
#1Michael B. Morrissey (St And: University of St Andrews)H-Index: 24
#2Maria João Janeiro (St And: University of St Andrews)H-Index: 3
Last.Emmanuel Milot (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières)H-Index: 15
view all 8 authors...
View next paperImplications of the difference between true and predicted breeding values for the study of natural selection and micro-evolution.