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Four strategies to find, evaluate, and engage with online resources in emergency medicine

Published on Mar 1, 2018in Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine1.83
· DOI :10.1017/cem.2017.387
Andrea Lo1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of O: University of Ottawa),
Eric Shappell3
Estimated H-index: 3
(U of C: University of Chicago)
+ 4 AuthorsTeresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(McMaster University)
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Abstract
Despite the rapid expansion of online educational resources for emergency medicine, barriers remain to their effective use by emergency physicians and trainees. This article expands on previous descriptions of techniques to aggregate online educational resources, outlining four strategies to help learners navigate, evaluate, and contribute online. These strategies include 1) cultivating digital mentors, 2) browsing the most popular free open access medical education (FOAM) websites, 3) using critical appraisal tools developed for FOAM, and 4) contributing new online content.
  • References (34)
  • Citations (7)
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References34
Newest
Published on Sep 1, 2017in Annals of Emergency Medicine5.21
Brent Thoma15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan),
Stefanie S. Sebok-Syer4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UWO: University of Western Ontario)
+ 281 AuthorsCharlotte Alexander2
Estimated H-index: 2
Study objective Open educational resources such as blogs are increasingly used for medical education. Gestalt is generally the evaluation method used for these resources; however, little information has been published on it. We aim to evaluate the reliability of gestalt in the assessment of emergency medicine blogs. Methods We identified 60 English-language emergency medicine Web sites that posted clinically oriented blogs between January 1, 2016, and February 24, 2016. Ten Web sites were select...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Annals of Emergency Medicine5.21
Michelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco),
Nikita Joshi6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Stanford University)
+ 1 AuthorsTeresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(McMaster University)
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Perspectives on medical education
Keeth Krishnan3
Estimated H-index: 3
(U of T: University of Toronto),
Brent Thoma15
Estimated H-index: 15
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan)
+ 2 AuthorsTeresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(McMaster University)
Purpose Online open educational resources are increasingly used in medical education, particularly blogs and podcasts. However, it is unclear whether these resources can be adequately appraised by end-users. Our goal was to determine whether gestalt-based recommendations are sufficient for emergency medicine trainees and attending physicians to reliably recommend online educational resources to others.
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Jeff Riddell5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Alisha Brown1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsJoshua Jauregui2
Estimated H-index: 2
Introduction: Twitter has recently gained popularity in emergency medicine (EM). Opinion leaders on Twitter have significant influence on the conversation and content, yet little is known about these opinion leaders. We aimed to describe a methodology to identify the most influential emergency physicians (EPs) on Twitter and present a current list. Methods: We analyzed 2,234 English language EPs on Twitter from a previously published list of Twitter accounts generated by a snowball sampling tech...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Academic Medicine5.08
Daniel Sidalak1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Eve Purdy5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 3 AuthorsTeresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
Publishing in academic journals is challenging for learners. Those who pass the initial stages of internal review by an editor often find the anonymous peer review process harsh. Academic blogs offer alternate avenues for publishing medical education material. Many blogs, however, lack a peer review process, which some consumers argue compromises the quality of materials published. CanadiEM (formerly BoringEM) is an academic educational emergency medicine blog dedicated to publishing high-qualit...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Annals of Emergency Medicine5.21
Teresa Man Yee Chan1
Estimated H-index: 1
(McMaster University),
Andrew Grock1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of California, Berkeley)
+ 3 AuthorsMichelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)
Study objective Since 2014, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) has used the Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) score to critically appraise online content. The primary goals of this study are to determine the interrater reliability (IRR) of the ALiEM AIR rating score and determine its correlation with expert educator gestalt. We also determine the minimum number of educator-raters needed to achieve acceptable reliability. Methods Eight educators each rated 83 online educational post...
Published on Oct 22, 2016in International Journal of Medical Education
L.B. Chartier4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UHN: University Health Network),
Anton Helman2
Estimated H-index: 2
(North York General Hospital)
Internet-based medical education resources, such as podcasts, have increased in number and popularity in recent years, and are being integrated into all levels of medical training and continuing medical education.1,2 Podcasts may be more effective than traditional methods of instruction such as textbooks for learners who prefer auditory modes of learning.3 Social media, through which podcasts can be distributed, is defined as the social interaction among people through virtual communities. The t...
Published on May 1, 2016in Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Michelle Lin18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Nikita Joshi6
Estimated H-index: 6
+ 6 AuthorsLalena M. Yarris13
Estimated H-index: 13
ABSTRACT Background Emergency medicine (EM) residency programs can provide up to 20% of their planned didactic experiences asynchronously through the Individualized Interactive Instruction (III) initiative. Although blogs and podcasts provide potential material for III content, programs often struggle with identifying quality online content. Objective To develop and implement a process to curate quality EM content on blogs and podcasts for resident education and III credit. Methods We developed ...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in African Journal of Emergency Medicine
Natalie Thurtle1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Colin Banks5
Estimated H-index: 5
(JCU: James Cook University)
+ 2 AuthorsJeremy Furyk12
Estimated H-index: 12
(JCU: James Cook University)
Introduction Free Open Access Medical Education encompasses a broad array of free online resources and discussion fora. The aim of this paper was to describe whether Emergency Medicine trainees in different contexts know about Free Open Access Medical Education, whether or not they know about its different platforms, which ones they use, and what the major barriers to regular usage are. Methods A convenience sample was surveyed on awareness and use of Free Open Access Medical Education blogs, po...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Teresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Brent Thoma15
Estimated H-index: 15
+ 4 AuthorsKulamakan Kulasegaram14
Estimated H-index: 14
Author(s): Chan, MD, MHPE, Teresa M.; Thoma, MD, MA, Brent; Krishnan, BHSc, Keeth; Lin, MD, Michelle; Carpenter, MD, MSc, Christopher R.; Astin, MD, Matt; Kulasegaram, PhD, Kulamakan | Abstract: Introduction: Online education resources (OERs) like blogs and podcasts frequently augment or replace traditional medical education resources such as textbooks and lectures. Trainees’ ability to evaluate these resources is poor, and no quality assessment aids have been developed to assist them. This stud...
Cited By7
Newest
Published on Jul 3, 2019in Journal of Medical Toxicology
Jon B. Cole12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Sarah K. Knack + 3 AuthorsBrian E. Driver9
Estimated H-index: 9
Background Though the use of small bolus doses of vasopressors, termed “push dose pressors,” has become common in emergency medicine, data examining this practice are scant. Push dose pressors frequently involve bedside dilution, which may result in errors and adverse events. The objective of this study was to assess for instances of human error and adverse hemodynamic events during push dose pressor use in the emergency department.
Published on May 23, 2019
Teresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(McMaster University),
Anuja Bhalerao (U of T: University of Toronto)+ 2 AuthorsAndrew Grock5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Trends in Cardiovascular Medicine4.46
John Mandrola4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Baptist Health),
Piotr Futyma
Abstract Digital and social media are transforming society and Medicine. In this review, we discuss how social media speeds the translation of medical evidence, disrupts peer review, changes the path to leadership, improves lifelong learning, connects colleagues and may even transform cardiovascular research. Despite some downsides, we make the case that social media will be a net positive for Medicine.
Published on Mar 1, 2018
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports2.40
Aaron T. Gerds12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Cleveland Clinic),
Teresa M. Chan16
Estimated H-index: 16
(McMaster University)
Purpose of Review Social media is becoming a crucial part of our society. While the field of medicine has lagged behind in adopting and harnessing these platforms, we are now starting to see a surge in social media usage for medical education and scientific communication (e.g., knowledge translation, research collaboration, discussion, and discourse). Over the course of this review, we aim to update the reader on the way in which Twitter and other social media platforms may be used in hematology...
View next paperFree Open Access Meducation (FOAM): the rise of emergency medicine and critical care blogs and podcasts (2002-2013)