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Founder effects drive the genetic structure of passively dispersed aquatic invertebrates

Published on Dec 11, 2018in PeerJ 2.12
· DOI :10.7717/peerj.6094
Javier Montero-Pau11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Valencia),
Africa Gómez30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Hull),
Manuel Serra30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Valencia)
Abstract
Populations of passively dispersed organisms in continental aquatic habitats typically show high levels of neutral genetic differentiation, despite their high dispersal capabilities. Several evolutionary factors, including founder events and local adaptation, and life cycle features such as high population growth rates and the presence of propagule banks, have been proposed to be responsible for this paradox. Here, we have modeled the colonization process in these organisms to assess the impact of migration rate, growth rate, population size, local adaptation and life-cycle features on their population genetic structure. Our simulation results show that the strongest effect on population structure is caused by persistent founder effects, resulting from the interaction of a few population founders, high population growth rates, large population sizes and the presence of diapausing egg banks. In contrast, the role of local adaptation, genetic hitchhiking and migration is limited to small populations in these organisms. Our results indicate that local adaptation could have different impact on genetic structure in different groups of zooplankters.
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Scientific Reports 4.12
Lluis Franch-Gras1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Valencia),
Christoph Hahn9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Hull)
+ 3 AuthorsAfrica Gómez30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Hull)
Environmental fluctuations are ubiquitous and thus essential for the study of adaptation. Despite this, genome evolution in response to environmental fluctuations —and more specifically to the degree of environmental predictability– is still unknown. Saline lakes in the Mediterranean region are remarkably diverse in their ecological conditions, which can lead to divergent local adaptation patterns in the inhabiting aquatic organisms. The facultatively sexual rotifer Brachionus plicatilis shows d...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 6, 2017
Lluis Franch-Gras3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Valencia),
Eduardo M. García-Roger16
Estimated H-index: 16
(University of Valencia)
+ 1 AuthorsMaría José Carmona21
Estimated H-index: 21
(University of Valencia)
Understanding how organisms adaptively respond to environmental fluctuations is a fundamental question in evolutionary biology. The Mediterranean region typically exhibits levels of environmental unpredictability that vary greatly in habitats over small geographical scales. In cyclically parthenogenetic rotifers, clonal proliferation occurs along with occasional bouts of sex. These bouts contribute to the production of diapausing eggs, which allows survival between growing seasons. Here, we stud...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 18, 2017in PLOS ONE 2.77
Caspar A. Hallmann7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Radboud University Nijmegen),
Martin Sorg1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 9 AuthorsThomas Hörren1
Estimated H-index: 1
Global declines in insects have sparked wide interest among scientists, politicians, and the general public. Loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardize ecosystem services. Our understanding of the extent and underlying causes of this decline is based on the abundance of single species or taxonomic groups only, rather than changes in insect biomass which is more relevant for ecological functioning. Here, we used a standardized pr...
234 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Oikos 3.71
Eva Tarazona4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Eduardo M. García-Roger16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
María José Carmona21
Estimated H-index: 21
The adaptive response of organisms to unpredictable environments is increasingly recognized as a central topic in fundamental and applied evolutionary ecology. Selection due to environmental unpredictability can act on multiple traits of an organism's life cycle to reduce the impact of high environmental variance. The aim of this research was to study how unpredictability selects for diapause traits: 1) the timing of sex (a proxy of the timing of diapausing egg production), and 2) the diapausing...
10 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2017in Hydrobiologia 2.17
Javier Montero-Pau11
Estimated H-index: 11
(University of Valencia),
Manuel Serra30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Valencia),
Africa Gómez30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Hull)
Diapausing egg banks are reservoirs of ecological and genetic diversity in continental zooplankton. However, although habitat size has often been used as a proxy for population size, the relationship between diapausing egg bank size and genetic diversity has not been explicitly tested in zooplankton. We estimated the density and size of diapausing egg banks, habitat size and genetic diversity (for mitochondrial and nuclear markers) of 14 populations of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis in an end...
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Scientific Reports 4.12
Anna Badosa16
Estimated H-index: 16
,
Dagmar Frisch13
Estimated H-index: 13
+ 2 AuthorsAfrica Gómez30
Estimated H-index: 30
Isolation mediates persistent founder effects on zooplankton colonisation in new temporary ponds
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Evolution 3.82
Jennifer N. Lohr2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Fribourg),
Christoph R. Haag1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Fribourg)
Reduced population size is thought to have strong consequences for evolutionary processes as it enhances the strength of genetic drift. In its interaction with selection, this is predicted to increase the genetic load, reduce inbreeding depression, and increase hybrid vigor, and in turn affect phenotypic evolution. Several of these predictions have been tested, but comprehensive studies controlling for confounding factors are scarce. Here, we show that populations of Daphnia magna, which vary st...
17 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Molecular Ecology 6.13
Ivan Paz-Vinas6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Toulouse),
Géraldine Loot9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Toulouse)
+ 1 AuthorsSimon Blanchet5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Centre national de la recherche scientifique)
Describing, understanding and predicting the spatial distribution of genetic diversity is a central issue in biological sciences. In river landscapes, it is generally predicted that neutral genetic diversity should increase downstream, but there have been few attempts to test and validate this assumption across taxonomic groups. Moreover, it is still unclear what are the evolutionary processes that may generate this apparent spatial pattern of diversity. Here, we quantitatively synthesized publi...
34 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2015in Ecology Letters 9.14
Steven Declerck34
Estimated H-index: 34
,
Andrea R. Malo1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 4 AuthorsSpiros Papakostas14
Estimated H-index: 14
(University of Turku)
Humans alter biogeochemical cycles of essential elements such as phosphorus (P). Prediction of ecosystem consequences of altered elemental cycles requires integration of ecology, evolutionary biology and the framework of ecological stoichiometry. We studied micro-evolutionary responses of a herbivorous rotifer to P-limited food and the potential consequences for its population demography and for ecosystem properties. We subjected field-derived, replicate rotifer populations to P-deficient and P-...
31 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2015in Molecular Ecology 6.13
Tim M. Blackburn75
Estimated H-index: 75
,
Julie L. Lockwood33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Rutgers University),
Phillip Cassey40
Estimated H-index: 40
(University of Adelaide)
The process by which a species becomes a biological invader, at a location where it does not naturally occur, can be divided into a series of sequential stages (transport, introduction, establishment and spread). A species' success at passing through each of these stages depends, in a large part, on the number of individuals available to assist making each transition. Here, we review the evidence that numbers determine success at each stage of the invasion process and then discuss the likely mec...
81 Citations Source Cite
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