Match!

Community replacement, ecological shift and early warning signals prior to the end-Permian mass extinction: A case study from a nearshore clastic-shelf section in South China

Published on Dec 1, 2017in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology2.616
· DOI :10.1016/j.palaeo.2017.07.042
Yang Zhang9
Estimated H-index: 9
(China University of Geosciences),
Guang Rong Shi33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Deakin University)
+ 4 AuthorsYong Lei2
Estimated H-index: 2
Abstract
Abstract A quantitative investigation of the ecological changes of shallow-marine benthos was undertaken at the Permian–Triassic boundary section at Zhongzhai, South China. The studied fossil material primarily included brachiopods and bivalves owing to their abundance throughout the section, but other subordinate taxonomic groups including ostracods and microgastropods were also integrated for discussion. Overall, a succession of three benthonic paleocommunities was recognized representing three connected ecological evolutionary stages across the Permian–Triassic transition. Both Stage 1 and Stage 2 paleocommunities predated the end-Permian boundary mass extinction, and were characterized by relatively high diversity of brachiopods and bivalves, with no or very rare other taxa. Approaching the end-Permian mass extinction and the PTB itself, the paleocommunity abruptly changed and was replaced by the Stage 2 paleocommunity that was characterized by a relatively low Shannon's diversity (H) coupled with a high Simpson's dominance index (D) and, most notably, a changeover from Neochonetes to Tethyochonetes (both are brachiopod genera) as the most significant ecological dominants. This Simpson's dominance index (D) shift correlates well with food shortage (i.e. much reduced terrestrial influx and acritarch abundance), and is therefore interpreted to signify, possibly, intensified interspecific competitions with Tethyochonetes seemingly outcompeting Neochonetes presumably due to its preadapted smaller body size. The post-extinction (Stage 3) paleocommunity is distinguished by a highly characteristic low-diversity and high-abundance fauna comprised mainly of lingulid brachiopods, Claraia bivalves, microgastropods and ostracods, suggesting a unique and highly stressful ecological regime. In this paleocommunity, Claraia might have acted like a “disaster taxon” and, as such, its ecological functional role in the paleocommunity was activated and elevated because of exceptional ecological conditions (e.g., anoxia, hyperthermal and/or severe food shortage). From the studied section, a number of ecological traits including species abundance distribution, Shannon's diversity (H), community dominance and body-size structure were identified as demonstrating significant changes accompanying community replacement prior to the end-Permian mass extinction. The fact that these changes preceded the mass extinction may suggest that these traits could represent some early warning signals for an impending ecological regime shift. This extended interpretation clearly has significant implications for modern ecological studies to predict future impending ecological regime shifts.
  • References (69)
  • Citations (9)
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
33 Citations
4 Authors (Haijun Song, ..., Hongfu Yin)
174 Citations
200041.04Science
6 Authors (Y. G. Jin, ..., Douglas H. Erwin)
484 Citations
78% of Scinapse members use related papers. After signing in, all features are FREE.
References69
Newest
#1Huiting Wu (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 6
#2Guang Rong Shi (Deakin University)H-Index: 33
Last. Weihong He (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
view all 3 authors...
Abstract. Two middle Permian (Capitanian) to Early Triassic (Griesbachian) rugosochonetidae brachiopod genera, Fusichonetes Liao in Zhao et al., 1981 and Tethyochonetes Chen et al., 2000, have been regarded as two distinct taxa and used as such for a wide range of discussions including biostratigraphy, paleoecology, paleobiogeography, and the Permian-Triassic boundary mass extinction. However, the supposed morphological distinctions between the two taxa are subtle at best and appear to represent...
4 CitationsSource
Procedures introduced here make it possible, first, to show that background (piecemeal) extinction is recorded throughout geologic stages and substages (not all extinction has occurred suddenly at the ends of such intervals); second, to separate out background extinction from mass extinction for a major crisis in earth history; and third, to correct for clustering of extinctions when using the rarefaction method to estimate the percentage of species lost in a mass extinction. Also presented here...
73 CitationsSource
#1Carlie Pietsch (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 3
#2Elizabeth Petsios (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 6
Last. David J. Bottjer (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 58
view all 3 authors...
Abstract We present a correlated record of carbon isotope geochemistry and sedimentological analysis for the Lower Triassic Werfen Formation from the Italian Dolomites. Macro- and mid-sized fossil diversity, ecology, and climate sensitivity are included to provide an integrated account of the benthic response to paleoenvironmental change. Novel communities developed in the wake of the mass extinction during pervasive fluctuations in environmental conditions. In the sedimentary sequences of the W...
11 CitationsSource
#1Elizabeth Petsios (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 6
#2David J. Bottjer (SC: University of Southern California)H-Index: 58
Abstract. The end-Permian mass extinction, the largest extinction of the Phanerozoic, led to a severe reduction in both taxonomic richness and ecological complexity of marine communities, eventually culminating in a dramatic ecological restructuring of communities. During the Early Triassic recovery interval, disaster taxa proliferated and numerically dominated many marine benthic invertebrate assemblages. These disaster taxa include the bivalve genera Claraia, Unionites, Eumorphotis, and Promya...
12 CitationsSource
#1Yang Zhang (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 9
#2Guang Rong Shi (Deakin University)H-Index: 33
Last. Yifan Xiao (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 5
view all 10 authors...
This paper has undertaken a quantitative and statistical analysis of brachiopod body-size changes through the marine Permian–Triassic boundary section at Zhongzhai, Guizhou Province, South China, and found that (1) pre-mass extinction dwarfing is evident for at least the rugosochonetid species chosen for this study; (2) Tethyochonetes species reduced their size earlier than that in the Neochonetes species; and (3) no significant size reduction occurred in the newly evolved species of these two g...
14 CitationsSource
#1Weihong He (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Guang Rong Shi (Deakin University)H-Index: 33
Last. Shunbao Wu (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 7
view all 9 authors...
Abstract New analysis of Permian–Triassic brachiopod assemblages and body-size changes in South China provides insights into the process of the environmental crisis in the lead up to the end-Permian mass extinction. The recently discovered Daoduishan section of South China can be considered as an important auxiliary section for the study of brachiopods at the Meishan Section D of South China, the GSSP of the Permian–Triassic Boundary (PTB). This paper studied changes of the brachiopod assemblage...
11 CitationsSource
#1Zhong-Qiang Chen (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 35
#2Hao Yang (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
Last. Long Chen (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 1
view all 17 authors...
Abstract The Meishan section, South China is the Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the Permian–Triassic boundary (PTB), and is also well known for the best record demonstrating the Permian–Triassic mass extinction (PTME) all over the world. This section has also been studied using multidisciplinary approaches to reveal the possible causes for the greatest Phanerozoic biocrisis of life on Earth; many important scenarios interpreting the great dying have been proposed on the basis of ...
70 CitationsSource
#1Yang ZhangH-Index: 9
#2Weihong HeH-Index: 18
Last. Huiting WuH-Index: 6
view all 5 authors...
Zhang, Y., He, W.H., Shi, G.R., Zhang, K.X. & Wu, H.T., 26.2.2015. A new Changhsingian (Late Permian) brachiopod fauna from the Zhongzhai section (South China) Part 3: Productida. Alcheringa 39, xxx–xxx. ISSN 0311-5518.As the third and last part of a systematic palaeontological study of the brachiopod fauna from the Permian–Triassic boundary section at Zhongzhai in Guizhou Province (South China), this paper reports 15 species (including three new species: Tethyochonetes minor sp. nov., Neochonet...
6 CitationsSource
#1Haijun SongH-Index: 20
#2Paul B. WignallH-Index: 58
Last. Li TianH-Index: 14
view all 8 authors...
The Permian-Triassic mass extinction was the most severe biotic crisis in the past 500 million years. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the crisis, but few account for the spectrum of extinction selectivity and subsequent recovery. Here we show that selective losses are best accounted for by a combination of lethally warm, shallow waters and anoxic deep waters that acted to severely restrict the habitable area to a narrow mid-water refuge zone. The relative tolerance of groups to thi...
90 CitationsSource
#1Weihong He (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Guang Rong Shi (Deakin University)H-Index: 33
Last. Y.-F. Xiao (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 1
view all 11 authors...
Analysis of Permian-Triassic brachiopod diversity and body size changes from different water depths spanning the continental shelf to basinal facies in South China provides insights into the process of environmental deterioration. Comparison of the temporal changes of brachiopod diversity between deepwater and shallow-water facies demonstrates that deepwater brachiopods disappeared earlier than shallow-water brachiopods. This indicates that high environmental stress commenced first in deepwater ...
35 CitationsSource
Cited By9
Newest
#1Hui-Ting Wu (PKU: Peking University)
#2Yang Zhang (China University of Geosciences)
Last. Yuanlin Sun (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 15
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Chengtuo Niu (Jiangnan University)H-Index: 5
#2Yue Xue (Jiangnan University)
Last. Qi Li (Jiangnan University)H-Index: 10
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Lajiaojiang (red chili pastes) was a traditional food in China. This study aimed to reveal the structure and succession of bacterial communities in lajiaojiang production. The composition of bacteria communities in the three stages of lajiaojiang production, including pickled chili, fried chili and finished product, were investigated using 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing and qPCR method. Lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc) and Weissella were the core bacteria in pickled ch...
Source
#1Jing Chen (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 8
#2Haijun Song (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 20
Last. Shunbao Wu (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 7
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Whether body size reduction (the Lilliput Effect) occurred in the Early Triassic invertebrates remains a matter of debate. Here, we investigate the size evolution of brachiopods spanning the Late Permian through the Early to Middle Triassic based on 3316 brachiopod specimens from South China. Our results show that the maximum and median size among species decreased dramatically from the latest Permian (Changhsingian) to the earliest Triassic (Griesbachian), and then increased during the...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ting Song (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 2
#2Jinnan Tong (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 26
Last. Yunfei Huang (Yangtze University)H-Index: 6
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Immediately after the latest Permian mass extinction, bivalve faunas colonized the Permian-Triassic Transitional Beds (PTTB), especially in littoral clastic facies of South China. The Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) transitional bivalve fauna is composed of holdovers, long-term survivors and newly evolved taxa, and characterized by moderate diversity and high dominance. However, the taxonomy and ecology of this bivalve fauna of littoral clastic facies have not been well understood, especially i...
2 CitationsSource
#1Yuangeng Huang (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 7
#2Zhong-Qiang Chen (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 35
Last. Zhen Guo (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 2
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Although expanded ocean anoxia has long been believed to be a direct killing mechanism causing mortality of organisms during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, little has been published on the extent and timing of this anoxia in Gondwana. The Guryul Ravine section in Kashmir, northern India, is a classic Permian–Triassic boundary (PTB) section containing high-quality marine sedimentary and fossil records, and thus provides a unique opportunity to study the redox conditions associated...
6 CitationsSource
#1Weihong He (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Guang Rong Shi (Deakin University)H-Index: 33
Last. Shunbao Wu (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 7
view all 4 authors...
In order to decipher brachiopod diversity and body-size changes in relation to varied palaeobathymetry and time, the stratigraphic divisions in each section and age correlation among sections are essential for the study. Details of each section are thus given below.
Source
#1Weihong He (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
#2Guang Rong Shi (Deakin University)H-Index: 33
Last. Jian-Jun Bu (CGS: China Geological Survey)
view all 3 authors...
As concluded in Chap. 6, the decline of brachiopod diversity in deep-water facies took place earlier than in shallow-water facies during the Permian–Triassic transition. This phenomenon lets us recall the scenario that the upward migration of anoxic deep waters in a stratified ocean caused the radiolarian extinction in a Japanese pelagic environment (Isozaki 2009; Takahashi et al. 2013). Therefore, elsewhere we have proposed that the formation of a stratified ocean and, particularly, upward migr...
Source
#1William J. Foster (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 8
#2Silvia Danise (PSU: Plymouth State University)H-Index: 11
Last. Richard J. Twitchett (Natural History Museum)H-Index: 35
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The late Permian mass extinction was the most severe biotic crisis of the Phanerozoic, with associated environmental changes that included the expansion of hypoxic and anoxic conditions in shallow shelf settings. It has been hypothesized that wave aeration promoted oxygen transport to the seafloor providing a ‘habitable zone' in the shallowest marine environments that allowed the survival and rapid recovery of benthic invertebrates during the Early Triassic. We test this hypothesis by s...
2 CitationsSource
#1William J. Foster (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 8
#2Daniel J. Lehrmann (Trinity University)H-Index: 25
Last. Rowan C. Martindale (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 11
view all 5 authors...
10 CitationsSource
#1Huiting Wu (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 6
#2Weihong He (China University of Geosciences)H-Index: 18
Last. Elizabeth A. Weldon (Deakin University)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Analysis of the Permian–Triassic palaeocommunities from basinal facies in South China provides an insight into the environmental deterioration occurring in the prelude to the mass extinction event. Quantitative and multivariate analyses on three brachiopod palaeocommunities from the Changhsingian to the earliest Triassic in basinal facies in South China have been undertaken in this study. Although the end-Permian extinction has been proved to be a one-stepped event, ecological warning s...
4 CitationsSource