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Relationship Between β-cell Response and Insulin Sensitivity in Horses based on the Oral Sugar Test and the Euglycemic Hyperinsulinemic Clamp

Published on Sep 1, 2017in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine2.29
· DOI :10.1111/jvim.14799
S. Lindåse4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences),
Katarina Nostell7
Estimated H-index: 7
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsJ. Bröjer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Cite
Abstract
Background A hyperbolic relationship between β-cell response and insulin sensitivity (IS) has been described in several species including rodents, dogs, and humans. This relationship has not been elucidated in the horse. Hypothesis/Objectives To determine whether the hyperbolic relationship between β-cell response and IS exists in horses by using indices of β-cell response from the oral sugar test (OST) and IS measurements from the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC). A second aim was to compare how well IS estimates from the OST and EHC correlate. Animals Forty-nine horses with different degrees of insulin regulation (normal-to-severe insulin dysregulation). Methods Cross-sectional study. Horses were examined with an OST and an EHC. Results Decreased IS was associated with increased β-cell response in the horses. Nine of 12 comparisons between indices of β-cell response and IS measures fulfilled the criteria for a hyperbolic relationship. Indices of IS calculated from the OST correlated highly with the insulin-dependent glucose disposal rate (M) and the insulin-dependent glucose disposal rate per unit of insulin (M/I) determined from the EHC (r = 0.81–0.87). Conclusions and Clinical Importance A hyperbolic relationship between β-cell response and IS exists in horses, which suggest that horses with insulin dysregulation respond not only with postprandial hyperinsulinemia but are also insulin resistant. The OST is primarily a test for β-cell response rather than a test for IS, but calculated indices of IS from the OST may be useful to estimate IS in horses, especially when the horse is insulin resistant.
  • References (57)
  • Citations (4)
Cite
References57
Newest
Published on May 1, 2016in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine2.29
L.K. Dunbar1
Estimated H-index: 1
(OSU: Ohio State University),
K.A. Mielnicki1
Estimated H-index: 1
(OSU: Ohio State University)
+ 2 AuthorsT.A. Burns9
Estimated H-index: 9
(OSU: Ohio State University)
Background Several tests have been evaluated in horses for quantifying insulin dysregulation to support a diagnosis of equine metabolic syndrome. Comparing the performance of these tests in the same horses will provide clarification of their accuracy in the diagnosis of equine insulin dysregulation. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between basal serum insulin concentrations (BIC), the oral sugar test (OST), the combined glucose-insulin test (CGIT), and the frequentl...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Equine Veterinary Journal2.12
S. Smith2
Estimated H-index: 2
(RVC: Royal Veterinary College),
P.A. Harris44
Estimated H-index: 44
(Waltham Centre for Pet Nutrition),
N. J. Menzies-Gow15
Estimated H-index: 15
(RVC: Royal Veterinary College)
SummaryReasons for performing study The in-feed oral glucose test (OGT) and oral sugar test (OST) are advocated as field tests of insulin sensitivity in horses and ponies but have not been directly compared. Objectives To compare the insulin response to OGT and OST in 8 ponies and 5 horses of unknown insulin sensitivity. Study design Experimental, randomised crossover study. Methods Animals were fasted for 8 h overnight before and throughout testing. They were fed 1 g/kg bwt glucose powder with ...
Published on Feb 26, 2016in American Journal of Veterinary Research1.07
S. Lindåse4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Katarina Nostell7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 2 AuthorsJ. Bröjer9
Estimated H-index: 9
OBJECTIVE To quantify insulin sensitivity and monitor glucose, insulin, and lipid concentrations in a group of moderately insulin-resistant horses during induction of obesity by use of a forage diet supplemented with fat and during subsequent turnout to pasture. ANIMALS 9 adult Standardbred mares (11 to 20 years old). PROCEDURES Weight gain of horses was induced during 22 weeks by use of a forage diet supplemented with fat fed in gradually increasing amounts, followed by feeding of that fat-supp...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in American Journal of Veterinary Research1.07
S.E. Pratt-Phillips5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NCSU: North Carolina State University),
Raymond J. Geor40
Estimated H-index: 40
,
L. Jill McCutcheon12
Estimated H-index: 12
OBJECTIVE To compare, in horses, estimates of insulin sensitivity obtained from minimal model analysis (MMA) of a frequently sampled IV glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT) with estimates from the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC) and to evaluate the validity of surrogate estimates of insulin sensitivity derived from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). ANIMALS 18 mature Standardbreds (mean ± SD body weight, 428.9 ± 35.9 kg; mean ± SD body condition score, 4.4 ± 1.0 [on a scale of 1 to 9]). P...
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica1.51
S. Lindåse4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences),
Katarina Nostell7
Estimated H-index: 7
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsJ. Bröjer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Background An oral sugar test (OST) using Karo® Light Corn Syrup has been developed in the USA as a field test for the assessment of insulin dysregulation in horses but the syrup is not available in Scandinavian grocery stores. The aim of the study was to compare the results of a modified OST between horses with equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) and healthy horses using a Scandinavian commercially available glucose syrup (Dansukker glykossirap). In addition, the effect of breed and the repeatabili...
Published on Oct 1, 2014in Metabolism-clinical and Experimental6.51
Sergio Ghione113
Estimated H-index: 113
(UniPi: University of Pisa),
Andrea Mari55
Estimated H-index: 55
Abstract Different in vivo tests explore different aspects of β-cell function. Because intercorrelation of insulin secretion indices is modest, no single in vivo test allows β-cell function to be assessed with accuracy and specificity comparable to insulin sensitivity. Physiologically-based mathematical modeling is necessary to interpret insulin secretory responses in terms of relevant parameters of β-cell function. Models can be used to analyze intravenous glucose tests, but secretory responses...
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science0.93
Amy Schuver1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UT: University of Tennessee),
Nicholas Frank23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Tufts University)
+ 1 AuthorsSarah B. Elliott18
Estimated H-index: 18
(UT: University of Tennessee)
Abstract Straightforward testing procedures are needed to facilitate the diagnosis of insulin dysregulation in horses because hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance are associated with laminitis. Results of an oral sugar test (OST) were compared with those of the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). We hypothesized that OST and IVGTT area under the curve values for glucose (AUCg) and insulin (AUCi) would be closely correlated, as defined by a correlation coefficient value ≥0.90. Both tes...
Published on Mar 31, 2014in Current Diabetes Reviews
Eugenio Cersosimo31
Estimated H-index: 31
,
Carolina Solis-Herrera8
Estimated H-index: 8
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio)
+ 2 AuthorsCurtis Triplitt22
Estimated H-index: 22
Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by a progressive failure of pancreatic β-cell function (BCF) with insulin resistance. Once insulin over-secretion can no longer compensate for the degree of insulin resistance, hyperglycemia becomes clinically significant and deterioration of residual β-cell reserve accelerates. This pathophysiology has important therapeutic implications. Ideally, therapy should address the underlying pathology and should be started early along the spectrum of dec...
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Equine Veterinary Journal2.12
N. Frank1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
E. M. Tadros1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Jun 1, 2013in Diabetes Care15.27
Lindsey Sjaarda2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Pittsburgh),
SoJung Lee34
Estimated H-index: 34
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 3 AuthorsSilva Arslanian62
Estimated H-index: 62
(University of Pittsburgh)
OBJECTIVE To compare β-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity, disposition index (DI), calculated from two clamps (2cDI, insulin sensitivity from the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and first-phase insulin from the hyperglycemic clamp) with the DI calculated from the hyperglycemic clamp alone (hcDI). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Complete data from hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were available for 330 youth: 73 normal weight, 168 obese with normal glucose tolerance, ...
Cited By4
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science0.93
J. Moore1
Estimated H-index: 1
(NCSU: North Carolina State University),
P.D. Siciliano8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NCSU: North Carolina State University),
S.E. Pratt-Phillips5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NCSU: North Carolina State University)
Abstract Weight loss plans in horses typically use dietary restriction, but exercise may have additional benefits. This study aimed to compare the effects of a diet or exercise protocol resulting in comparable caloric restriction in obese horses. Ten obese horses were paired according to sex, age, and breed or breed type. One horse from each pair was randomly assigned to either diet (DIET)—intake restricted to approximately 85% of digestible energy requirements or exercise (EX)—exercised to expe...
Published on May 8, 2019in Equine Veterinary Journal2.12
S. Lindåse (SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences), H. Johansson (SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)+ 1 AuthorsJ. Bröjer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Published on May 1, 2019in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine2.29
M. A. de Laat13
Estimated H-index: 13
(QUT: Queensland University of Technology),
Martin N. Sillence26
Estimated H-index: 26
(QUT: Queensland University of Technology),
Dania Reiche5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Boehringer Ingelheim)
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Domestic Animal Endocrinology2.30
S. Lindåse4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences),
Cecilia E. Müller9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsJ. Bröjer9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
Abstract Information about the effect of nonstructural carbohydrates (NSCs) in forage on the postprandial glucose and insulin response in horses is scarce. This is of interest as postprandial hyperinsulinemia in horses is a risk factor for laminitis. In addition, insulin sensitivity (IS) differs between breeds. The aim was to evaluate the postprandial glucose and insulin response to haylage diets with different NSC content in horses of 2 different breeds and to evaluate the relationship between ...
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