Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!

Effect of a synthetic feline facial pheromone product on stress scores and incidence of upper respiratory tract infection in shelter cats

Published on Aug 15, 2017in Javma-journal of The American Veterinary Medical Association 1.30
· DOI :10.2460/javma.251.4.413
Robin M. Chadwin1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Melissa J. Bain9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Philip H. Kass53
Estimated H-index: 53
Cite
Abstract
OBJECTIVE To determine whether a synthetic feline facial pheromone product would decrease stress scores and upper respiratory tract infection (URI) incidence in shelter-housed cats. DESIGN Randomized controlled clinical trial. ANIMALS 336 stray, feral, owner-relinquished, or legally impounded cats at 2 animal shelters in northern California. PROCEDURES 5 cat holding rooms (3 at shelter A and 2 at shelter B) were used. A diffuser containing either synthetic pheromone or placebo was randomly assigned to each room, and cats were exposed for a 21-day period. Data collected on each cat included signalment, daily stress scores, and daily URI incidence. After 21 days, diffusers were removed for a 7-day washout period. The type of diffuser in each room was switched, and data were collected for another 21 days. Findings were statistically compared between exposure types and other groupings. RESULTS Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed no significant difference between exposure (pheromone or placebo) and URI i...
  • References (16)
  • Citations (2)
Cite
References16
Newest
Published on Jul 1, 2013in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.58
Marian Horzinek Chairman Abcd57
Estimated H-index: 57
,
Diane Addie24
Estimated H-index: 24
+ 14 AuthorsAlbert Lloret18
Estimated H-index: 18
Overview:In this article, the ABCD guidelines published in the JFMS Special Issue of July 2009 (Volume 11, Issue 7, pages 527–620) are updated by including previously unavailable and novel information. For a better picture, the reader is advised to consult that issue before focusing on the novel features.
Aki Tanaka2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Denae Wagner3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
+ 1 AuthorsKate Hurley13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
Objective—To identify associations among change in body weight, behavioral stress score, food intake score, and development of upper respiratory tract infection (URI) among cats admitted to an animal shelter. Design—Prospective cohort study. Animals—60 adult cats admitted to an animal shelter. Procedures—Body weight was measured on days 0 (intake), 7, 14, and 21. Behavioral stress and food intake were scored daily for the first 7 days; cats were monitored daily for URI. Results—49 of the 60 (82%...
Published on Apr 15, 2011in PLOS ONE 2.78
Daniel Mills29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Lincoln),
Se Redgate4
Estimated H-index: 4
(University of Lincoln),
Gary M. Landsberg1
Estimated H-index: 1
Feline urine spraying inside the home is a common problem behaviour that owners seek advice for from veterinarians. Individual trials relating to a variety of interventions produce variable results, and to date, no consensus on the value of different treatments has emerged. This study therefore aimed to meta-analyse, current data from appropriate published clinical trials that evaluate treatments for feline urine spraying. Inclusion and exclusion criteria for study selection were predefined and ...
Published on Jun 15, 2010in Javma-journal of The American Veterinary Medical Association 1.30
Diane Frank12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Guy Beauchamp35
Estimated H-index: 35
,
C. Palestrini10
Estimated H-index: 10
Objective—To systematically review the scientific literature to identify, assess the quality of, and determine outcomes of studies conducted to evaluate the use of pheromones for treatment of undesirable behavior in cats and dogs. Design—Systematic review. Study Population—Reports of prospective studies published from January 1998 through December 2008. Procedures—The MEDLINE and CAB Abstracts databases were searched with the following key terms: dog OR dogs OR canine OR cat OR cats OR feline AN...
Published on Oct 1, 2009in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.58
Julie D. Dinnage1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Janet M. Scarlett35
Estimated H-index: 35
(Cornell University),
James R. Richards7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Cornell University)
Upper respiratory tract disease (URTD) is common and spreads quickly in cats residing in animal shelters in the United States. Estimates of the actual incidence of URTD are sparse, yet this information is very important for welfare, economic and research purposes. In a large urban shelter in the northeastern US, 531 individual kittens, 701 litters, and 2203 adult cats were observed for signs of URTD during their stays. The median lengths of stay for adult cats and kittens were 5 and 4 days, resp...
Published on Jul 1, 2006in Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia 1.62
Peter W Kronen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Cornell University),
John W. Ludders17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Cornell University)
+ 3 AuthorsSharon Koski1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Cornell University)
Abstract Objective To evaluate whether a synthetic analogue of feline facial pheromone (FFP) calms cats before, and reduces struggling during intravenous catheterization. Design Block-randomized, ‘blinded’ clinical trial. Animals Seventy-seven healthy cats presented for elective surgery. Procedure Cats given glycopyrrolate and oxymorphone were assigned to one of four treatments: acepromazine and exposure to FFP (aceFFP); acepromazine and exposure to a placebo (acePlac); exposure to FFP only (FFP...
Published on Apr 1, 2005in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.58
Michael J. Bannasch5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis),
Janet E. Foley41
Estimated H-index: 41
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
Upper respiratory tract infection (URI) propagates readily within cats in shelters and often results in euthanasia of affected cats. In a case-control evaluation of 573 cats in eight shelters in California in 2001 and 2002, the prevalence of feline calicivirus (FCV) was from 13 to 36%, feline herpesvirus (FHV) was from 3 to 38%, and prevalence of Bordetella bronchiseptica, Chlamydophila felis, and Mycoplasma species was from 2 to 14%. Cats with URI tended to be housed in isolation, dehydrated, a...
Emily McCobb8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Gary J. Patronek16
Estimated H-index: 16
+ 2 AuthorsMichael S. Stone4
Estimated H-index: 4
Objective—To measure stress levels among cats in traditional and enriched shelter environments via behavioral assessment and urine cortisol-to-creatinine ratios. Design—Cross-sectional observational study. Animals—120 cats in 4 Boston-area animal shelters Procedure—Cats were randomly selected and observed during 3 periods (morning, midday, and afternoon) of 1 day and scored by use of a behavioral assessment scale. The next day, urine samples were collected for analysis of the urine cortisol-to-c...
Published on Jan 1, 2005in Veterinary Clinics of North America-small Animal Practice 1.27
Kate Hurley13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UC Davis: University of California, Davis)
Managing feline infectious disease in animal shelters is an immensely challenging task. Financial resources are limited, facilities are often less than ideal, and cats are highly susceptible to the effects of a stressful and crowded environment. Carrier states are common for feline infectious conditions, which means a constant influx of potentially contagious animals. High turnover of caretakers necessitates clearly written systems of communication and constant training to maintain consistency. ...
Published on Jun 1, 2004in Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery 1.58
Danielle Gunn-Moore28
Estimated H-index: 28
(Edin.: University of Edinburgh),
M.E. Cameron2
Estimated H-index: 2
Synthetic feline facial pheromone (FFP) (Feliway; Ceva Animal Health) was assessed for the management of cats with recurrent feline idiopathic cystitis (FIC). Nine of 12 cats completed the randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover pilot study. They had their environment treated daily with either FFP or placebo for 2 months, after which time the treatment groups were reversed. Owners used visual analogue scales to define the severity of their cat's clinical signs and behavioural c...
Cited By2
Newest
Published in Applied Animal Behaviour Science 1.82
Rachel Foreman-Worsley (NTU: Nottingham Trent University), Mark J. Farnworth14
Estimated H-index: 14
(NTU: Nottingham Trent University)
Abstract Cats are one of the world’s most populous companion animals, yet little is known about how the home environment is adapted relative to their needs. Outdoor access is thought to be beneficial for both the physical and mental wellbeing of cats, yet as urbanisation increases, reducing owner access to outdoor spaces, an increasing number of cats are kept strictly indoors. The impact of an indoor lifestyle on feline behaviour and welfare is little explored and poorly understood. This study u...
Practical relevance:Cats are one of the most common companion animals in the world. However, relatively little scientific research has been conducted on cat behavior. With problem behaviors a leading reason for relinquishment of cats to shelters, or abandonment outdoors, solutions to address feline behavioral problems can have important welfare benefits. Because naturally occurring pheromones produce measurable species-specific responses in cats, the use of synthetic pheromone products consistin...