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Toward prediction in the restoration of biodiversity

Published on Aug 1, 2017in Journal of Applied Ecology5.782
· DOI :10.1111/1365-2664.12940
Lars A. Brudvig24
Estimated H-index: 24
(MSU: Michigan State University)
Abstract
  • References (142)
  • Citations (14)
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References142
Newest
#1Daniel C. Laughlin (UW: University of Wyoming)H-Index: 31
#2Robert T. Strahan (New Mexico Highlands University)H-Index: 4
Last. W. Wallace Covington (NAU: Northern Arizona University)H-Index: 46
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1. Predicting restoration outcomes requires an understanding of the natural variability of ecosystem properties. A hierarchy of predictability has been proposed that ranks measures of restoration success from most-to-least predictable in the following order: vegetation structure > taxonomic diversity > functional diversity > taxonomic composition. This hierarchy has not been tested empirically, and the location within the hierarchy of trait-based measures, such as community-level trait means and...
15 CitationsSource
#1Nash E. Turley (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 11
#2John L. Orrock (UW: University of Wisconsin-Madison)H-Index: 39
Last. Lars A. Brudvig (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 24
view all 4 authors...
15 CitationsSource
#1Rebecca S. Barak (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 5
#2Evelyn W. WilliamsH-Index: 5
Last. Daniel J. Larkin (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 14
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Summary Ecological restoration is critical for mitigating habitat loss and providing ecosystem services. However, restorations often have lower diversity than remnant, reference sites. Phylogenetic diversity is an important component of biodiversity and ecosystem function that has only recently been used to evaluate restoration outcomes. To move towards prediction in the restoration of biodiversity, it is necessary to understand how phylogenetic diversity of restorations compares with that of re...
16 CitationsSource
#1Jonathan T. Bauer (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 12
#2Noah Blumenthal (IU: Indiana University Bloomington)H-Index: 1
Last. Heather L. Reynolds (IU: Indiana University)H-Index: 27
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Summary A critical challenge in the science and practice of restoration ecology is to understand the drivers of variation in restoration outcomes. Soil microbial communities may have a role in explaining this variation due to both site-to-site variation in the composition of soil microbial communities and due to variation that can arise due to plant-soil feedbacks. We tested the relative importance of between-site variation in soil microbial community composition and plant-soil feedbacks in shap...
9 CitationsSource
#1Katharine L. Stuble (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 14
#2Stephen E. Fick (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 8
Last. Truman P. Young (UC Davis: University of California, Davis)H-Index: 53
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Summary The outcomes of restoration efforts are contingent on the specifics of the restoration practices utilized, but also on uncontrolled contingencies such as site effects and year effects. Although restoration practitioners have long been aware that the successes of their projects vary from site to site and from year to year, there have been few direct experimental tests of these contingencies. We established grassland restoration plots identically across three sites in northern California, ...
27 CitationsSource
#1Karen D. Holl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 40
#2John Leighton Reid (Missouri Botanical Garden)H-Index: 3
Last. Rakan A. Zahawi (Organization for Tropical Studies)H-Index: 22
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Summary Developing restoration strategies that accelerate natural successional processes and are resource-efficient is critical to facilitating tropical forest recovery across millions of hectares of deforested lands in the tropics. We compared tree recruitment after a decade in three restoration treatments (natural regeneration, applied nucleation/island tree planting and plantation) and nearby reference forest in the premontane rain forest zone in southern Costa Rica. The study was replicated ...
22 CitationsSource
#1Loralee Larios (UM: University of Montana)H-Index: 8
#2Lauren M. Hallett (UO: University of Oregon)H-Index: 16
Last. Katharine N. Suding (INSTAAR: Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research)H-Index: 42
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Summary Managers are increasingly looking to apply concepts of resilience to better anticipate and understand conservation and restoration in a changing environment. In this study, we explore how information on demography (recruitment, growth and survival) and competitive effects in different environments and with different starting species abundances can be used to better understand resilience. We use observational and experimental data to better understand dynamics between native Stipa pulchra...
7 CitationsSource
#1Chad R. Zirbel (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 5
#2Tyler Bassett (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 4
Last. Lars A. Brudvig (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 24
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Summary Recovering biological diversity and ecosystem functioning are primary objectives of ecological restoration, yet these outcomes are often unpredictable. Assessments based on functional traits may help with interpreting variability in both community composition and ecosystem functioning because of their mechanistic and generalizable nature. This promise remains poorly realized, however, because tests linking environmental conditions, functional traits, and ecosystem functioning in restorat...
22 CitationsSource
#1Karen D. Holl (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)H-Index: 40
Recent initiatives at regional, national, and global scales have called for unprecedented levels of forest restoration to counteract decades of rapid deforestation ( 1 , 2 ). Thus far, 30 countries have committed to restore 91 million hectares (ha) of deforested landscapes, an area the size of Venezuela, by 2020; at the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit, a global target of 350 million ha was set for 2030 ( 1 ). These bold targets are motivated by diverse goals, including conserving biodiversity...
52 CitationsSource
#1Marc W. Cadotte (U of T: University of Toronto)H-Index: 43
#2Jos Barlow (Lancaster University)H-Index: 46
Last. Philip A. Stephens (Durham University)H-Index: 26
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#1Timothy L. Staples (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 2
#2Margaret M. Mayfield (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 26
Last. John M. Dwyer (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 18
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The clearing of natural vegetation for agriculture has reduced the capacity of natural systems to provide ecosystem functions. Ecological restoration can restore desirable ecosystem functions, such as creating habitat for animal conservation and carbon sequestration as woody biomass. In order to maintain these beneficial ecosystem functions, restoration projects need to mature into self-perpetuating communities. Here we compared the ecological attributes of two types of restoration, “active” tre...
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#1Connor M. Wood (UMaine: University of Maine)H-Index: 3
#2Zachary G. Loman (UMaine: University of Maine)H-Index: 4
Last. Cynthia S. Loftin (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 13
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Abstract Applied ecology is based on an assumption that a management action will result in a predicted outcome. Testing the prediction accuracy of ecological models is the most powerful way of evaluating the knowledge implicit in this cause-effect relationship, however, the prevalence of predictive modeling and prediction testing are spreading slowly in ecology. The challenge of prediction testing is particularly acute for small-scale studies, because withholding data for prediction testing (e.g...
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#1Knut RydgrenH-Index: 23
#2Inger AuestadH-Index: 7
Last. Jan Sulavik (AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)H-Index: 1
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#1J. Leighton Reid (Missouri Botanical Garden)H-Index: 13
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Temperate woodlands are one of the world's ecosystems in greatest need of ecological restoration, but relatively little is known about their floristic recovery dynamics over decadal timescales. From 2000 to 2012, we monitored understory plant communities in a woodland mosaic in Missouri, USA, as it underwent restoration via prescribed, dormant-season burning and mechanical thinning of red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) and exotic shrubs. Native species richness increased linearly by 36% over this ...
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#1Claire E. Wainwright (Exponent)H-Index: 40
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#1Myriam Garrouj (INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)
#2Didier Alard (INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)H-Index: 28
Last. Marie-Lise Benot (INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)H-Index: 7
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The restoration of floodplain grasslands has benefited from many studies of the underlying mechanisms. Among the operational tools that resulted, hay transfer is now used increasingly to alleviate the effects of limited seed dispersal and recruitment. To improve this method, we still need to understand how it can affect restoration trajectories, and particularly their direction and magnitude during the early stages of restoration. Based on concepts from the field of community ecology theory, we ...
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#1Nicholas A. Barber (SDSU: San Diego State University)H-Index: 2
#2Anna K. Farrell (NIU: Northern Illinois University)H-Index: 1
Last. Holly P. Jones (NIU: Northern Illinois University)H-Index: 18
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#1Luca ScapinH-Index: 3
#2Matteo ZucchettaH-Index: 10
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A restoration project is planned to take place in the northern Venice lagoon (northern Adriatic Sea, Italy), aiming at introducing freshwater into a confined shallow water lagoon area and recreating transitional water habitats. This work describes the shifts in the nekton (fish and decapods) community structure to be expected following the future salinity decrease in the restoration area. Nekton was sampled at a series of natural shallow water sites located along salinity gradients in the Venice...
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#1Luca Scapin (Ca' Foscari University of Venice)H-Index: 3
#2Matteo ZucchettaH-Index: 10
Last. Piero Franzoi (Ca' Foscari University of Venice)H-Index: 19
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One of the major challenges to ensure effective restoration of estuarine habitats is to establish success criteria to determine whether the goals of restoration are met. The aim of this work is to propose and test an approach to identify reference conditions and assess the recovery of nekton (fish, decapods and cephalopods) assemblages at seagrass restoration sites. Nekton sampling took place from 2014 to 2017 in the northern Venice lagoon (northern Adriatic Sea, Italy) during spring at eight si...
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#1Justin C. Luong (UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)
#2Patrick L. Turner (UCSC: University of California, Santa Cruz)
Last. Katja C. Seltmann (UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)H-Index: 10
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Author(s): Luong, Justin C; Turner, Patrick L; Phillipson, Celina N; Seltmann, Katja C | Abstract: It is hypothesised that ecological restoration in grasslands can induce an alternative stable state shift in vegetation. The change in vegetation influences insect community assemblages and allows for greater functional redundancy in pollination and refuge for native insect species. 2. Insect community assemblages at eight coastal California grassland sites were evaluated. Half of these sites had u...
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