Icons / Logo / Facebook Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / Google Created with Sketch. Icons / Logo / ORCID Created with Sketch. Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!

Social processing in early adolescence: Associations between neurophysiological, self-report, and behavioral measures

Published on Sep 1, 2017in Biological Psychology 2.63
· DOI :10.1016/j.biopsycho.2017.07.001
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Ellen M. Kessel9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 2 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract Peer relationships play a major role in adolescent development, but few methods exist for measuring social processing at the neurophysiological level. This study extends our pilot study of Island Getaway, a task for eliciting event-related potentials (ERPs) to peer feedback. We differentiated ERPs using principal components analysis (PCA) and examined associations with behavioral and self-report measures in young adolescents ( N  = 412). PCA revealed an early negativity in the ERP enhanced for rejection feedback, followed by a series of positivities (consistent with reward positivity [RewP], P300, and late positive potential) that were enhanced for acceptance feedback. Greater self-reported task engagement correlated with a larger RewP to acceptance and lower rates of rejecting peers. Youth higher in depressive symptoms exhibited a blunted RewP to social acceptance and reported lower engagement. Results highlight ERP components sensitive to peer feedback that may inform understanding of social processes relevant to typical and atypical development.
  • References (60)
  • Citations (4)
Cite
References60
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience 4.92
Michelle Achterberg5
Estimated H-index: 5
(LEI: Leiden University),
Anna C. K. van Duijvenvoorde18
Estimated H-index: 18
(LEI: Leiden University)
+ 3 AuthorsEveline A. Crone4
Estimated H-index: 4
(LEI: Leiden University)
Abstract Being accepted or rejected by peers is highly salient for developing social relations in childhood. We investigated the behavioral and neural correlates of social feedback and subsequent aggression in 7–10-year-old children, using the Social Network Aggression Task (SNAT). Participants viewed pictures of peers that gave positive, neutral or negative feedback to the participant’s profile. Next, participants could blast a loud noise towards the peer, as an index of aggression. We included...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Psychophysiology 3.38
Amanda Levinson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Brittany C. Speed4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 1 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
The ability to differentiate between rewards and losses is critical for motivated action, and aberrant reward and loss processing has been associated with psychopathology. The reward positivity (RewP) and feedback negativity (FN) are ERPs elicited by monetary gains and losses, respectively, and are promising individual difference measures. However, few studies have reported on the psychometric properties of the RewP and FN—crucial characteristics necessary for valid individual difference measure...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in NeuroImage 5.81
M.J.W. Van der Molen5
Estimated H-index: 5
(LEI: Leiden University),
Laura M. S. Dekkers3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
+ 2 AuthorsMolen van der M. W49
Estimated H-index: 49
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
Social connectedness theory posits that the brain processes social rejection as a threat to survival. Recent electrophysiological evidence suggests that midfrontal theta (4–8 Hz) oscillations in the EEG provide a window on the processing of social rejection. Here we examined midfrontal theta dynamics (power and inter-trial phase synchrony) during the processing of social evaluative feedback. We employed the Social Judgment paradigm in which 56 undergraduate women (mean age=19.67 years) were aske...
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Katie L. Burkhouse9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)
Abstract Vulnerability models of depression posit that individual differences in trait-like vulnerabilities emerge early in life and increase risk for the later development of depression. In this review, we summarize advances from affective neuroscience using neural measures to assess vulnerabilities in youth at high risk for depression due to parental history of depression or temperament style, as well as prospective designs evaluating the predictive validity of these vulnerabilities for sympto...
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Psychophysiology 3.38
Alexandria Meyer13
Estimated H-index: 13
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Matthew D. Lerner18
Estimated H-index: 18
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 2 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
There is growing interest in psychophysiological and neural correlates of psychopathology, personality, and other individual differences. Many studies correlate a criterion individual difference variable (e.g., anxiety) with a psychophysiological measurement derived by subtracting scores taken from two within-subject conditions. These subtraction-based difference scores are intended to increase specificity by isolating variability of interest. Using data on the error-related negativity (ERN) and...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.65
Brady D. Nelson17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Greg Perlman12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 2 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
Objective:A blunted neural response to rewards has recently emerged as a potential mechanistic biomarker of adolescent depression. The reward positivity, an event-related potential elicited by feedback indicating monetary gain relative to loss, has been associated with risk for depression. The authors examined whether the reward positivity prospectively predicted the development of depression 18 months later in a large community sample of adolescent girls.Method:The sample included 444 girls 13....
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Biological Psychiatry 11.50
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago),
Greg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 5 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Abstract Background Natural disasters expose entire communities to stress and trauma, leading to increased risk for psychiatric symptoms. Yet, the majority of exposed individuals are resilient, highlighting the importance of identifying underlying factors that contribute to outcomes. Methods The current study was part of a larger prospective study of children in Long Island, New York ( n = 260). At age 9, children viewed unpleasant and pleasant images while the late positive potential (LPP), an ...
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Psychological Science 4.90
Johanna M. Jarcho1
Estimated H-index: 1
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Megan M. Davis3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UIUC: University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign)
+ 7 AuthorsEric E. Nelson43
Estimated H-index: 43
(OSU: Ohio State University)
Social reticence is expressed as shy, anxiously avoidant behavior in early childhood. With development, overt signs of social reticence may diminish but could still manifest themselves in neural responses to peers. We obtained measures of social reticence across 2 to 7 years of age. At age 11, preadolescents previously characterized as high (n = 30) or low (n = 23) in social reticence completed a novel functional-MRI-based peer-interaction task that quantifies neural responses to the anticipatio...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
Laura M. S. Dekkers3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UvA: University of Amsterdam),
Melle J.W. van der Molen6
Estimated H-index: 6
(LEI: Leiden University)
+ 2 AuthorsMolen van der M. W49
Estimated H-index: 49
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
This study provides a joint analysis of the cardiac and electro-cortical—early and late P3 and feedback-related negativity (FRN)—responses to social acceptance and rejection feedback. Twenty-five female participants performed on a social- and age-judgment control task, in which they received feedback with respect to their liking and age judgments, respectively. Consistent with previous reports, results revealed transient cardiac slowing to be selectively prolonged to unexpected social rejection ...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Development and Psychopathology 3.59
Jennifer N. Bress9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Alexandria Meyer13
Estimated H-index: 13
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Greg Hajcak Proudfit22
Estimated H-index: 22
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential elicited by monetary reward and loss; it is thought to relate to reward-related neural activity and has been linked to depression in children and adults. In the current study, we examined the stability of FN, and its relationship with depression in adolescents, over 2 years in 45 8- to 13-year-old children. From Time 1 to Time 2, FN in response to monetary loss and in response to monetary gain showed moderate to strong reliability ( r s = .6...
Cited By4
Newest
Published on May 31, 2019in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 2.62
Brent I. Rappaport (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis), Laura Hennefield1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
+ 5 AuthorsDeanna M75
Estimated H-index: 75
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
Peer victimization (or bullying) is a known risk factor for depression, especially among youth. However, the mechanisms connecting victimization experience to depression symptoms remains unknown. As depression is known to be associated with neural blunting to monetary rewards, aberrant responsiveness to social rewards may be a key deficit connecting socially stressful experiences with later depression. We therefore sought to determine whether adolescents’ experiences with social stress would be ...
Published on Apr 24, 2019in Frontiers in Psychiatry 3.16
Emma Barkus19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Johanna C. Badcock30
Estimated H-index: 30
Humans are highly social beings, yet people with social anhedonia experience reduced interest in or reward from social situations. Social anhedonia is a key facet of schizotypal personality, an important symptom of schizophrenia, and increasingly recognized as an important feature in a range of other psychological disorders. However, to date, there has been little examination of the similarities and difference in social anhedonia across diagnostic borders. Here, our goal was to conduct a selecti...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 3.41
Dara E. Babinski14
Estimated H-index: 14
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
+ 2 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Many youth with ADHD experience peer difficulties, but the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction remain unknown. Very little work has examined neurophysiological measures of social feedback processing in relation to ADHD symptoms. The goal of this study was to examine associations of ADHD symptoms with indicators of sensitivity to social feedback in a laboratory task and self-report of rejection sensitivity. A large community sample of 10- to 15-year-old adolescents (N = 391; Mage = 12.64, 48.6...
Published on Oct 1, 2018in International Journal of Psychophysiology 2.41
Paige Ethridge2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University),
Anna Weinberg26
Estimated H-index: 26
(McGill University)
Abstract Reward-related event-related potentials (ERPs) are often used to index individual differences that signal the presence or predict the onset of psychopathology. However, relatively little research has explored the psychometric properties of reward-related ERPs. Without understanding their psychometric properties, the value of using ERPs as biomarkers for psychopathology is limited. The present study, therefore, sought to establish the internal consistency reliability and convergent valid...
Published on Aug 1, 2018in Journal of Affective Disorders 4.08
Estee M. Hausman (SBU: Stony Brook University), Roman Kotov36
Estimated H-index: 36
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 3 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Abstract Background Anxious youth are at increased risk for later depressive disorders, but not all anxious youth develop depression. Sequential comorbidity models emphasize shared risk factors and anxiety sequelae, but some anxious youth who later develop depression may have risk factors that are relatively specific to depression, in addition to a liability to anxiety. We examined several variables that appear relatively specific to risk for depression—the personality traits of low positive aff...