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Neural responses to social and monetary reward in early adolescence and emerging adulthood

Published on Dec 1, 2017in Psychophysiology 3.38
· DOI :10.1111/psyp.12957
Paige Ethridge2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University),
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University)
+ 4 AuthorsAnna Weinberg26
Estimated H-index: 26
(McGill University)
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Abstract
Reward processing is often considered to be a monolithic construct, with different incentive types eliciting equivalent neural and behavioral responses. The majority of the literature on reward processing has used monetary incentives to elicit reward-related activity, yet social incentives may be particularly important due to their powerful ability to shape behavior. Findings from studies comparing social and monetary rewards have identified both overlapping and distinct responses. In order to explore whether reward processing is domain general or category specific (i.e., the same or different across reward types), the present study recorded ERPs from early adolescents (ages 12–13) and emerging adults (ages 18–25) while they completed social and monetary reward tasks. Temporospatial principal components analysis revealed morphologically similar reward positivities (RewPs) in the social and monetary reward tasks in each age group. In early adolescents, no significant difference was found between the magnitude of the RewP to social and monetary rewards. In emerging adults, however, the RewP to monetary rewards was significantly larger than the RewP to social rewards. Additionally, responses to feedback between the two tasks were not significantly correlated in either age group. These results suggest that both domain-general and category-specific processes underlie neural responses to rewards and that the relative incentive value of different types of rewards may change across development. Findings from this study have important implications for understanding the role that neural response to rewards plays in the development of psychopathology during adolescence.
  • References (97)
  • Citations (13)
Cite
References97
Newest
Published on Apr 1, 2017in Psychophysiology 3.38
Amanda Levinson5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Brittany C. Speed4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
+ 1 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
The ability to differentiate between rewards and losses is critical for motivated action, and aberrant reward and loss processing has been associated with psychopathology. The reward positivity (RewP) and feedback negativity (FN) are ERPs elicited by monetary gains and losses, respectively, and are promising individual difference measures. However, few studies have reported on the psychometric properties of the RewP and FN—crucial characteristics necessary for valid individual difference measure...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
Zdeňa A. Op de Macks3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of California, Berkeley),
Silvia A. Bunge45
Estimated H-index: 45
(University of California, Berkeley)
+ 3 AuthorsRonald E. Dahl99
Estimated H-index: 99
(University of California, Berkeley)
The onset of adolescence is associated with a developmental shift toward peers that contributes to increased prioritization for learning about and achieving social status, and an increased tendency to engage in risky behaviors. There is relatively little understanding about the specific links between these adolescent-typical phenomena, particularly regarding their neural underpinnings. Based on existing models that suggest the role of puberty in promoting adolescent status-seeking and risk-takin...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in American Journal of Psychiatry 13.65
Brady D. Nelson17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Greg Perlman12
Estimated H-index: 12
+ 2 AuthorsGreg Hajcak64
Estimated H-index: 64
Objective:A blunted neural response to rewards has recently emerged as a potential mechanistic biomarker of adolescent depression. The reward positivity, an event-related potential elicited by feedback indicating monetary gain relative to loss, has been associated with risk for depression. The authors examined whether the reward positivity prospectively predicted the development of depression 18 months later in a large community sample of adolescent girls.Method:The sample included 444 girls 13....
Published on Oct 1, 2016in Cognitive Neuroscience 3.36
Brian A. Anderson21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Johns Hopkins University)
Paying attention to stimuli that predict a reward outcome is important for an organism to survive and thrive. When visual stimuli are associated with tangible, extrinsic rewards such as money or food, these stimuli acquire high attentional priority and come to automatically capture attention. In humans and other primates, however, many behaviors are not motivated directly by such extrinsic rewards, but rather by the social feedback that results from performing those behaviors. In the present stu...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Neuropsychology (journal) 2.48
Raymond C.K. Chan49
Estimated H-index: 49
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Zhi Li20
Estimated H-index: 20
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
+ 5 AuthorsZhen Jin21
Estimated H-index: 21
Objective: Anticipatory and consummatory dissociation of hedonic experience may manifest as trait anhedonia in healthy and clinical populations. It is still unclear whether the underlying neural mechanisms of the monetary-based and affect-based incentive delay paradigms are distinct from each other. The present study aimed to examine the similarities and differences between the Affect Incentive Delay (AID) and the Monetary Incentive Delay (MID) imaging paradigms in relation to brain activations....
Alexis E. Whitton12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Harvard University),
Pragya Kakani2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Harvard University)
+ 4 AuthorsDiego A. Pizzagalli57
Estimated H-index: 57
(Harvard University)
Abstract Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly recurrent condition, and improving our understanding of the abnormalities that persist in remitted MDD (rMDD) may provide insight into mechanisms that contribute to relapse. Reward learning deficits linked to dysfunction in frontostriatal regions are characteristic of MDD. Although initial behavioral evidence of reward learning deficits in rMDD has emerged, it is unclear whether these deficits reflect impairments in neural reward pr...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in International Journal of Psychophysiology 2.41
Arielle R. Baskin-Sommers21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Yale University),
Dan Foti25
Estimated H-index: 25
(Purdue University)
Abstract A common criticism of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) is that its criteria are based more on behavioral descriptions than on underlying biological mechanisms. Increasingly, calls have intensified for a more biologically-based approach to conceptualizing, studying, and treating psychological disorders, as exemplified by the Research Domain Criteria Project (RDoC). Among the most well-studied neurobiological mechanisms is ...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Development and Psychopathology 3.59
Jennifer N. Bress9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Alexandria Meyer13
Estimated H-index: 13
(SBU: Stony Brook University),
Greg Hajcak Proudfit22
Estimated H-index: 22
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Feedback negativity (FN) is an event-related potential elicited by monetary reward and loss; it is thought to relate to reward-related neural activity and has been linked to depression in children and adults. In the current study, we examined the stability of FN, and its relationship with depression in adolescents, over 2 years in 45 8- to 13-year-old children. From Time 1 to Time 2, FN in response to monetary loss and in response to monetary gain showed moderate to strong reliability ( r s = .6...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology 2.16
Thomas M. Olino31
Estimated H-index: 31
(TU: Temple University),
Jennifer S. Silk38
Estimated H-index: 38
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 1 AuthorsErika E. Forbes42
Estimated H-index: 42
(University of Pittsburgh)
Abstract Objective: Offspring of depressed parents are at risk for developing depression at rates higher than the general population. One potential mechanism linking parent and offspring depression involves attenuated reward function. Despite the importance of social incentives for adolescents, no previous studies have relied on active social incentive reward paradigms in youth at risk for depression. The present study examined differences in youth self- and parent-report measures of and neural ...
Published on Sep 8, 2015
Jeffrey G. Parker18
Estimated H-index: 18
,
Kenneth H. Rubin77
Estimated H-index: 77
+ 2 AuthorsAllison A. Buskirk1
Estimated H-index: 1
and distant from their actions. Children will not only match or imitate the pretend acts of other children but also attempt to recruit the partner to join their pretend play. These efforts are not routinely successful, but it is clear that children are beginning to understand that nonliteral meanings can be shared by partners. From 21 to 24 months, children engage in similar pretend actions in the context of broader joint activity. Attempts to recruit others into pretense are more frequent and m...
Cited By13
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 2.62
Samantha Pegg (Vandy: Vanderbilt University), Paige Ethridge2
Estimated H-index: 2
(McGill University)
+ 3 AuthorsAutumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
Exposure to social stress is a well-established risk factor for the development and recurrence of depression. Reduced neural responsiveness to monetary reward has been associated with greater symptoms following stress exposure. It remains unclear whether reduced reward responsiveness serves as a mediator or moderator of the effects of stress on internalizing symptoms or whether similar patterns emerge with responses to social reward. We addressed this issue by measuring lifetime stress exposure ...
Published on Aug 1, 2019in International Journal of Psychophysiology 2.41
Kaylie A. Carbine5
Estimated H-index: 5
(BYU: Brigham Young University),
Hannah M. Lindsey (BYU: Brigham Young University)+ 1 AuthorsMichael J. Larson34
Estimated H-index: 34
(BYU: Brigham Young University)
Abstract Selective reporting (i.e., only reporting significant findings as opposed to all analyses or results) is a questionable research practice that undermines the integrity of published research. Psychophysiology research may be susceptible to selective reporting, given the high number of decision points and methodological complexity in analyses of psychophysiology data. We aimed to assess the presence of selective reporting and evidential value (i.e., that significant results are due to tru...
Published on May 31, 2019in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 2.62
Brent I. Rappaport (WashU: Washington University in St. Louis), Laura Hennefield1
Estimated H-index: 1
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
+ 5 AuthorsDeanna M75
Estimated H-index: 75
(WashU: Washington University in St. Louis)
Peer victimization (or bullying) is a known risk factor for depression, especially among youth. However, the mechanisms connecting victimization experience to depression symptoms remains unknown. As depression is known to be associated with neural blunting to monetary rewards, aberrant responsiveness to social rewards may be a key deficit connecting socially stressful experiences with later depression. We therefore sought to determine whether adolescents’ experiences with social stress would be ...
Published on May 7, 2019in Frontiers in Psychology 2.13
Daina Crafa7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Joanna Q. Liu , Mathieu B. Brodeur12
Estimated H-index: 12
Many quantitative research studies assume that cultural groups consist of anyone born and raised in the same country. Applying these criteria to the formation of study samples may produce cohorts that share a country but that are heterogeneous in relevant domains of culture. For example, in Canada, Franco- and Anglo-Canadians are generally assumed to represent different linguistic groups but the same cultural group. However, speaking a different first language also can mean exposure to different...
Published on Apr 24, 2019in Frontiers in Psychiatry 3.16
Emma Barkus19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Johanna C. Badcock30
Estimated H-index: 30
Humans are highly social beings, yet people with social anhedonia experience reduced interest in or reward from social situations. Social anhedonia is a key facet of schizotypal personality, an important symptom of schizophrenia, and increasingly recognized as an important feature in a range of other psychological disorders. However, to date, there has been little examination of the similarities and difference in social anhedonia across diagnostic borders. Here, our goal was to conduct a selecti...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 3.41
Dara E. Babinski14
Estimated H-index: 14
(PSU: Pennsylvania State University),
Autumn Kujawa19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
+ 2 AuthorsDaniel N. Klein72
Estimated H-index: 72
(SBU: Stony Brook University)
Many youth with ADHD experience peer difficulties, but the mechanisms underlying this dysfunction remain unknown. Very little work has examined neurophysiological measures of social feedback processing in relation to ADHD symptoms. The goal of this study was to examine associations of ADHD symptoms with indicators of sensitivity to social feedback in a laboratory task and self-report of rejection sensitivity. A large community sample of 10- to 15-year-old adolescents (N = 391; Mage = 12.64, 48.6...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in International Journal of Psychophysiology 2.41
Iulia Banica (McGill University), Aislinn Sandre1
Estimated H-index: 1
(McGill University),
Anna Weinberg26
Estimated H-index: 26
(McGill University)
Abstract Error monitoring is crucial for survival and adaptation, and can be indexed by the error-related negativity (ERN), a fronto-centrally located negative deflection in the event-related potential (ERP) waveform that differentiates erroneous from correct responses within 100 ms of a response. The ERN is seen as an early neural signal indicating the need to adjust performance and increase executive control. Previous findings indicate that punishing errors increases ERN magnitude, and that pu...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Biological Psychology 2.63
Jennifer Martin McDermott16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst),
Adaeze C. Egwuatu (UMass: University of Massachusetts Amherst)
Abstract Affective images engage motivational systems that shape emotional experience and cognitive processes. However, relatively little work has examined motivated attention toward distinct categories of approach motivation, particularly social motivation, in children. In the current study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were collected while children (n = 43; 22 females; M age = 8.49 years) completed a picture-viewing task using a novel stimulus set of child relevant images representing socia...
Published on Dec 4, 2018in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience 3.66
Daniela M Pfabigan (McGovern Institute for Brain Research), Anna M. Wucherer2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Vienna)
+ 3 AuthorsShihui Han45
Estimated H-index: 45
(McGovern Institute for Brain Research)