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Fruit and vegetable intake and the risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer and all-cause mortality – a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies

Published on Jun 1, 2017in Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases3.34
· DOI :10.1016/j.numecd.2017.04.004
Dagfinn Aune36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Imperial College London),
Edward Giovannucci175
Estimated H-index: 175
(Harvard University)
+ 7 AuthorsSerena Tonstad49
Estimated H-index: 49
(Oslo University Hospital)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract Background and aim Epidemiological studies have reported increased risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and all-cause mortality with greater resting heart rate, however, the evidence is not consistent. Differences by gender, adjustment for confounding factors, as well as the potential impact of subclinical disease are not clear. A previous meta-analysis missed a large number of studies, and data for atrial fibrillation have not been summarized before. We therefore aimed to clarify these associations in a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Methods and results PubMed and Embase were searched up to 29 March 2017. Summary RRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random effects models. Eighty seven studies were included. The summary RR per 10 beats per minute increase in resting heart rate was 1.07 (95% CI: 1.05–1.10, I 2  = 61.9%, n = 31) for coronary heart disease, 1.09 (95% CI: 1.00–1.18, I 2  = 62.3%, n = 5) for sudden cardiac death, 1.18 (95% CI: 1.10–1.27, I 2  = 74.5%, n = 8) for heart failure, 0.97 (95% CI: 0.92–1.02, I 2  = 91.4%, n = 9) for atrial fibrillation, 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02–1.10, I 2  = 59.5%, n = 16) for total stroke, 1.15 (95% CI: 1.11–1.18, I 2  = 84.3%, n = 35) for cardiovascular disease, 1.14 (95% CI: 1.06–1.23, I 2  = 90.2%, n = 12) for total cancer, and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.14–1.19, I 2  = 94.0%, n = 48) for all-cause mortality. There was a positive dose–response relationship for all outcomes except for atrial fibrillation for which there was a J-shaped association. Conclusion This meta-analysis found an increased risk of coronary heart disease, sudden cardiac death, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, cardiovascular disease, total cancer and all-cause mortality with greater resting heart rate.
  • References (316)
  • Citations (136)
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References316
Newest
Published on May 1, 2017in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society4.11
Kuibao Li4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Capital Medical University),
Chonghua Yao3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
+ 1 AuthorsLei Dong3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Objectives To examine whether the association between resting heart rate (RHR) and all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events differs according to age. Design Prospective cohort. Setting Community in Beijing, China. Participants Individuals aged 40 and older without cardiovascular disease at baseline (N = 6,209). Measurements Trained investigators interviewed participants using a standard questionnaire to obtain information on demographic characteristics, medical history and lifestyle risk fa...
Published on May 1, 2017in Journal of Cardiology2.29
Ming Zhang38
Estimated H-index: 38
(SZU: Shenzhen University),
Chengyi Han8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Zhengzhou University)
+ 15 AuthorsXiangyu Yang5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Zhengzhou University)
Abstract Background Studies have demonstrated an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated death (CVD death) with increased resting heart rate (RHR); however, whether the association is consistent in rural Chinese with hypertension and normotension is unknown. We examined the association of RHR and CVD death by hypertension and normotension status in rural Chinese people. Methods Baseline data for 20,069 participants ≥18 years old were collected during July to August of 2007 and ...
Published on Apr 1, 2017in American Journal of Cardiology2.84
Lubna Alhalabi1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Matthew Singleton1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wake Forest University)
+ 3 AuthorsElsayed Z. Soliman47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Wake Forest University)
Higher resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, with some reports showing the magnitude of association with all-cause mortality being stronger than that with cardiovascular mortality. This suggests that RHR association with mortality may not be limited to cardiovascular death. We compared the association between RHR with cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality in 6,743 participants (mean age 58.7 years, 52% women, 48% non-Hispan...
Published on Feb 1, 2017in JAMA Cardiology
Kishan S. Parikh9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Durham University),
Melissa A. Greiner21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Durham University)
+ 7 AuthorsRobert J. Mentz32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Duke University)
Importance Increased resting heart rate is associated with worse outcomes in studies of mostly white populations, but its significance is not well established in African Americans persons whose cardiac comorbidities and structural abnormalities differ. Objective To study the prognostic utility of heart rate in a community-based African American cohort in the Jackson Heart Study. Design, Setting, and Participants A total of 5261 participants in the Jackson Heart Study, a prospective, community-ba...
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Nature Genetics25.45
Ruben N. Eppinga6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Yanick Hagemeijer9
Estimated H-index: 9
+ 7 AuthorsDiana van Heemst80
Estimated H-index: 80
Pim van der Harst and colleagues report a genome-wide association study for resting heart rate in individuals of European ancestry and identify 64 associated loci, 46 of which have not been previously reported. A genetic risk score constructed using the associated variants is significantly associated with increased mortality risk.
Published on Dec 1, 2016in BMC Medicine8.29
Dagfinn Aune36
Estimated H-index: 36
(Imperial College London),
NaNa Keum17
Estimated H-index: 17
(Harvard University)
+ 7 AuthorsTeresa Norat86
Estimated H-index: 86
(Imperial College London)
Background Although nut consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, data on less common causes of death has not been systematically assessed. Previous reviews missed several studies and additional studies have since been published. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of nut consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer, and all-cause and cause-specific mortality.
Binh Nguyen10
Estimated H-index: 10
(USYD: University of Sydney),
Adrian Bauman101
Estimated H-index: 101
(USYD: University of Sydney)
+ 3 AuthorsDing Ding26
Estimated H-index: 26
(USYD: University of Sydney)
Background There is growing evidence for a relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and all-cause mortality. Few studies, however, specifically explored consuming raw versus cooked vegetables in relation to health and mortality outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation of all-cause mortality with: a) fruit and vegetable consumption, either combined or separately; b) the consumption of raw versus cooked vegetables in a large cohort of Australian middle-aged and o...
Published on Nov 1, 2016in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition6.57
Margarethe Goetz4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Emory University),
Suzanne E. Judd6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Emory University)
+ 3 AuthorsViola Vaccarino80
Estimated H-index: 80
(Emory University)
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Journal of Nutrition4.42
Margarethe Goetz4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Emory University),
Suzanne E. Judd6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UAB: University of Alabama at Birmingham)
+ 3 AuthorsViola Vaccarino80
Estimated H-index: 80
(Emory University)
Published on Nov 1, 2016in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition6.57
Susanna C. Larsson61
Estimated H-index: 61
(KI: Karolinska Institutet),
Alicja Wolk110
Estimated H-index: 110
(KI: Karolinska Institutet)
Cited By136
Newest
Published in Food Quality and Preference3.68
Michelle R. vanDellen12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UGA: University of Georgia),
Janani Rajbhandari-Thapa (UGA: University of Georgia), Julio Sevilla4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UGA: University of Georgia)
Abstract Fruit and vegetable consumption in the United States is below the recommended level for two reasons: lack of access and low preference. In this work, we identify lack of preference for vegetables as a public health issue and apply theories from psychology and marketing literature to study the effect of partitioned presentation of vegetables on consumption of vegetables . Separating items into single units with clear partitions generally reduces consumption of relatively appealing foods ...
Published on May 13, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Sangsang Li (Zhengzhou University), Bingxin Guo (Zhengzhou University)+ 4 AuthorsSonghe Shi (Zhengzhou University)
This study aimed to evaluate the role of the triglyceride (triacylglycerol) glucose (TyG) index in predicting and mediating the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This cohort study included 6078 participants aged over 60 years who participated in a routine health check-up programme from 2011 to 2017. The competing risk model, cox regression model and multimediator analyses were performed. TyG was calculated as ln [fasting triglyceride (mg/dl) × fasting plasma glucose (mg/dl)/2]. During...
Published on Dec 1, 2019in BMC Public Health2.57
Xiuting Mo2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Kyoto University),
Ruoyan Tobe Gai + 4 AuthorsRintaro Mori45
Estimated H-index: 45
Background Fruit and vegetable consumption was considered a protective effect against cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases (CVDs). This study aimed to project the reduction in the CVD burden under different scenarios of increased fruit and vegetable intake in Japan by 2060.
Ingrid Marie Hovdenak1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Agder),
Tonje Holte Stea10
Estimated H-index: 10
(University of Agder)
+ 3 AuthorsElling Bere29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Agder)
Background The rationale for promoting increased consumption of fruit and vegetables (FV) at an early age is based on results from previous tracking-studies, indicating that dietary habits learned in childhood sustain into adulthood. Previous tracking studies have several limitations (e.g. low study sample, few repeated measurements and/or short a follow-up period). In addition, to our knowledge, no study has shown that a dietary intervention initiated in childhood affects tracking of dietary be...
Published in Nature Communications11.88
Nicola P. Bondonno7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ECU: Edith Cowan University),
F Dalgaard1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ -3 AuthorsAedin Cassidy ('QUB': Queen's University Belfast)
Flavonoids, plant-derived polyphenolic compounds, have been linked with health benefits. However, evidence from observational studies is incomplete; studies on cancer mortality are scarce and moderating effects of lifestyle risk factors for early mortality are unknown. In this prospective cohort study including 56,048 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort crosslinked with Danish nationwide registries and followed for 23 years, there are 14,083 deaths. A moderate habitual int...
Published on Nov 1, 2019in Food Chemistry5.40
Soheila J. Maleki28
Estimated H-index: 28
(USDA: United States Department of Agriculture),
Jesus F. Crespo25
Estimated H-index: 25
,
Beatriz Cabanillas12
Estimated H-index: 12
(University of Bonn)
Abstract Inflammation plays a key role in diseases such as diabetes, asthma, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Diet can influence different stages of inflammation and can have an important impact on several inflammatory diseases. Increasing scientific evidence has shown that polyphenolic compounds, such as flavonoids, which are found in fruits, vegetables, legumes, or cocoa, can have anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies have demonstrated that flavonoids can inhibit regulatory enzymes o...
Published on Nov 1, 2019in Appetite3.50
Antonia Domke1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FU: Free University of Berlin),
Jan Keller5
Estimated H-index: 5
(FU: Free University of Berlin)
+ 2 AuthorsRalf Schwarzer66
Estimated H-index: 66
(University of Social Sciences and Humanities)
Abstract Background One promising intervention strategy to increase fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption is action planning. However, conditions of successful plan enactment, i.e., the translation of plans into action, have rarely been studied. Therefore, the relationship between plan characteristics and plan enactment is being examined. Methods Secondary analyses of an existing data set were conducted, based on a larger behavioral intervention study with a baseline assessment as well as a 2-wee...
Published on Nov 1, 2019in Neurobiology of Stress
Gessynger Morais-Silva4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UFSCar: Federal University of São Carlos),
Willian Costa-Ferreira3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UFSCar: Federal University of São Carlos)
+ 3 AuthorsMarcelo Tadeu Marin11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UFSCar: Federal University of São Carlos)
Abstract Stress exposure is an important risk factor for psychiatric and cardiovascular disorders. Two phenotypes related to coping with stress can be observed in rodents that experience chronic social defeat stress (SDS): susceptible, showing social avoidance and behavioral changes related to depression, and resilient, showing none of these alterations. Moreover, a strong correlation exists between depression and the development of or mortality due to cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless, litt...
Published on May 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment5.59
Christie Walker2
Estimated H-index: 2
(ETH Zurich),
Eileen R. Gibney26
Estimated H-index: 26
(UCD: University College Dublin)
+ 1 AuthorsStefanie Hellweg46
Estimated H-index: 46
(ETH Zurich)
Abstract Dietary choices affect personal health and environmental impacts, but little is known about the relation between these outcomes. Here we examine the intake-related health impacts and the food-production related impacts to ecosystems and human health by applying life cycle impact assessment methods to habitual diet data of 1457 European adults. We measured food production impacts for each individual in terms of Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) as calculated by the Recipe 2016 life ...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Journal of Environmental Management4.87
Angelina Frankowska , Harish Kumar Jeswani10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Adisa Azapagic44
Estimated H-index: 44
Fruits are indispensable for a balanced and healthy diet. However, their environmental impacts remain largely unknown. Using a life cycle approach, this work estimates for the first time the impacts of fruits consumed in the UK. What makes the UK a particularly interesting case is that only 7% of fruits are produced domestically, with the rest imported, largely (70%) from outside of Europe. In total, 21 types of fruit and 46 of fresh and processed products produced in the UK and abroad are consi...