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Birds of Stone: Chinese Avian Fossils from the Age of Dinosaurs

Published on Nov 1, 2016
Luis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
,
Meng Qingjin6
Estimated H-index: 6
Abstract
  • References (2)
  • Citations (13)
References2
Newest
Published on May 1, 2008in Journal of Anatomy2.64
ZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Julia A. Clarke27
Estimated H-index: 27
(NCSU: North Carolina State University),
Fucheng Zhang31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Most of Mesozoic bird diversity comprises species that are part of one of two major lineages, namely Ornithurae, including living birds, and Enantiornithes, a major radiation traditionally referred to as ‘opposite birds’. Here we report the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird from north-east China, which provides evidence that basal members of Enantiornithes share more morphologies with ornithurine birds than previously recognized. Morphological evolution in these two groups has been t...
Published on Mar 1, 2007in Frontiers of Biology in China
Zhou Zhonghe8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Zhang Fucheng3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
A synoptic review of the discoveries and studies of Chinese Mesozoic birds is provided in this paper. 40Ar/39Ar dating of several bird-bearing deposits in the Jehol Group has established a geochronological framework for the study of the early avian radiation. Chinese Mesozoic birds had lasted for at least 11 Ma during about 131 Ma and 120 Ma (Barremian to Aptian) of the middle and late Early Cretaceous, respectively. In order to further evaluate the change of the avian diversity in the Jehol Bio...
Cited By13
Newest
Published on Jan 30, 2019in Scientific Reports4.01
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar12
Estimated H-index: 12
(KU: University of Kansas)
+ 3 AuthorsLuis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)
Over the last three years, Burmese amber (~99 Ma, from Myanmar) has provided a series of immature enantiornithine skeletal remains preserved in varying developmental stages and degrees of completeness. These specimens have improved our knowledge based on compression fossils in Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, adding details of three-dimensional structure and soft tissues that are rarely preserved elsewhere. Here we describe a remarkably well-preserved foot, accompanied by part of the wing plumage. ...
Published on Dec 11, 2017in Historical Biology1.49
Federico L. Agnolin17
Estimated H-index: 17
,
Sebastián Rozadilla2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Ismar de Souza Carvalho20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UFRJ: Federal University of Rio de Janeiro)
AbstractSince its original description as a feather belonging to a basal bird, the phylogenetic position of Praeornis sharovi was debated. It was considered as belonging to a bird, a cycad leaf, or...
Published on Jan 24, 2019in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology2.31
Min Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Min Wang + -1 AuthorsZhonghe Zhou
We report a new small enantiornithine, Shangyang graciles gen. et sp. nov., based on a nearly complete and articulated skeleton from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Liaoning Province, north-eastern China. Shangyang has premaxillae that are completely fused rostrally as well as along the frontal processes, a previously unrecognized condition in Early Cretaceous birds. As in three other enantiornithine taxa, Shangyang preserves a pair of craniolateral processes in the sternum. Phylogen...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Cretaceous Research2.12
Di Liu5
Estimated H-index: 5
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History),
Luis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)
+ 2 AuthorsQingjin Meng14
Estimated H-index: 14
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
We describe two nearly complete enantiornithine skeletons from the Lower Cretaceous Huajiying Formation (ca. 130.7 Ma) of northern Hebei province, China. Many morphological features indicate that these specimens represent a new taxon, here named Orienantius ritteri gen. et sp.. nov. The new fossils preserve their plumage as well as rare information about their soft tissues, including the wing’s patagia. Multivariate analyses of their skeleton and flight feathers provide insight into the aerodyna...
Published on Dec 1, 2018in Nature Communications11.88
Dennis F. A. E. Voeten3
Estimated H-index: 3
(European Synchrotron Radiation Facility),
Jorge Cubo20
Estimated H-index: 20
(University of Paris)
+ 5 AuthorsSophie Sanchez15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Science for Life Laboratory)
Archaeopteryx is an iconic fossil taxon with feathered wings from the Late Jurassic of Germany that occupies a crucial position for understanding the early evolution of avian flight. After over 150 years of study, its mosaic anatomy unifying characters of both non-flying dinosaurs and flying birds has remained challenging to interpret in a locomotory context. Here, we compare new data from three Archaeopteryx specimens obtained through phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography to a representati...
Min Wang11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Thomas A. Stidham4
Estimated H-index: 4
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
ZHOUZhonghe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Early members of the clade Pygostylia (birds with a short tail ending in a compound bone termed “pygostyle”) are critical for understanding how the modern avian bauplan evolved from long-tailed basal birds like Archaeopteryx . However, the currently limited known diversity of early branching pygostylians obscures our understanding of this major transition in avian evolution. Here, we describe a basal pygostylian, Jinguofortis perplexus gen. et sp. nov., from the Early Cretaceous of China that ad...
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Current Biology9.19
Daniel J. Field13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Bath),
Antoine Bercovici12
Estimated H-index: 12
(National Museum of Natural History)
+ 5 AuthorsJacques A. Gauthier29
Estimated H-index: 29
(Yale University)
Summary The fossil record and recent molecular phylogenies support an extraordinary early-Cenozoic radiation of crown birds (Neornithes) after the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction [1–3]. However, questions remain regarding the mechanisms underlying the survival of the deepest lineages within crown birds across the K-Pg boundary, particularly since this global catastrophe eliminated even the closest stem-group relatives of Neornithes [4]. Here, ancestral state reconstructions of neorni...
Published on May 1, 2018in Nature43.07
Kevin Padian27
Estimated H-index: 27
Ichthyornis dispar is a key extinct bird species from when birds were shedding characteristics of their dinosaur ancestors and evolving their current features. A reconstructed skull of I. dispar now illuminates this transition. Ichthyornis dispar is a key extinct bird species from when birds were shedding characteristics of their dinosaur ancestors and evolving their current features. A reconstructed skull of I. dispar now illuminates this transition.
Published on May 1, 2018in Nature43.07
Daniel J. Field13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Bath),
Michael Hanson3
Estimated H-index: 3
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
+ 5 AuthorsBhart-Anjan S. Bhullar14
Estimated H-index: 14
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
The skull of living birds is greatly modified from the condition found in their dinosaurian antecedents. Bird skulls have an enlarged, toothless premaxillary beak and an intricate kinetic system that includes a mobile palate and jaw suspensorium. The expanded avian neurocranium protects an enlarged brain and is flanked by reduced jaw adductor muscles. However, the order of appearance of these features and the nature of their earliest manifestations remain unknown. The Late Cretaceous toothed bir...
Published on Feb 1, 2018in Journal of Asian Earth Sciences2.76
Guillermo Navalón2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UoB: University of Bristol),
Qingjin Meng14
Estimated H-index: 14
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
+ 5 AuthorsLuis M. Chiappe45
Estimated H-index: 45
(Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County)
Abstract The Huajiying Formation contains the earliest deposits of the Jehol Biota, representing the world’s second oldest avifauna. This avifauna includes the early confuciusornithid Eoconfuciusornis zhengi , the oldest occurrence of this clade and one of the earliest divergences of pygostylian birds. Although E. zhengi shows unique traits, the holotype’s immature age makes comparisons with the better known Confuciusornis sanctus problematic. As a result, the taxonomic validity of E. zhengi is ...