Are atheists undogmatic

Published on Oct 1, 2017in Personality and Individual Differences 1.97
· DOI :10.1016/j.paid.2017.04.046
Filip Uzarevic1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Université catholique de Louvain),
Vassilis Saroglou26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Université catholique de Louvain),
Magali Clobert5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Stanford University)
Abstract
Abstract Previous theory and evidence favor the idea that religious people tend to be dogmatic to some extent whereas non-religious people are undogmatic: the former firmly hold beliefs, some of which are implausible or even contrary to the real world evidence. We conducted a further critical investigation of this idea, distinguishing three aspects of rigidity: (1) self-reported dogmatism, defined as unjustified certainty vs. not standing for any beliefs, (2) intolerance of contradiction, measured through (low) endorsement of contradictory statements, and (3) low readiness to take a different from one's own perspective, measured through the myside bias technique. Non-believers, at least in Western countries where irreligion has become normative, should be lower on the first, but higher on the other two constructs. Data collected from three countries (UK, France, and Spain, total N  = 788) and comparisons between Christians, atheists, and agnostics confirmed the expectations, with agnostics being overall similar to atheists.
  • References (37)
  • Citations (4)
Cite
References37
Published on Dec 31, 2007in Psyke and Logos
Bart Duriez38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven),
Jessie Dezutter13
Estimated H-index: 13
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
+ 1 AuthorsDirk Hutsebaut16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)
Recently, Fontaine, Duriez, Luyten and Hutsebaut (2003) have shown that the Post-Critical Belief Scale (PCBS; Duriez, Fontaine & Hutsebaut, 2000) captures the two orthogonal bipolar dimensions of Exclusion versus Inclusion of Transcendence and Literal versus Symbolic along which Wulff (1991, 1997) organized the various possible approaches to religion. This chapter outlines the original and valuable contribution of the PCBS to the field of the psychology of religion by showing how the PCBS sheds ...
25 Citations
Published on Sep 20, 2004
Pippa Norris49
Estimated H-index: 49
(Harvard University),
Ronald Inglehart56
Estimated H-index: 56
Part I. Understanding Secularization: 1. The secularization debate 2. Measuring secularization 3. Comparing secularization worldwide Part II. Case Studies of Religion and Politics: 4. The puzzle of secularization in the United States and Western Europe 5. A religious revival in post-communist Europe? 6. Religion and politics in the Muslim world Part III. The Consequences of Secularization: 7. Religion, the Protestant ethic, and moral values 8. Religious organizations and social capital 9. Religi...
1,336 Citations
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Group Processes & Intergroup Relations 2.24
Magali Clobert5
Estimated H-index: 5
(National Fund for Scientific Research),
Vassilis Saroglou26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Université catholique de Louvain)
Accumulated research has shown that Western Christian religiosity often predicts prejudice toward various kinds of outgroups. On the contrary, initial recent evidence indicates that East Asian religiosity predicts tolerance of various outgroups--except atheists. To understand these differences, we investigated cognitive (intolerance of contradiction) and emotional (disgust) mechanisms possibly mediating the link between religiosity and prejudice vs. tolerance. In Study 1 (295 Westerners of Chris...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Individual Differences 1.28
Matthieu Van Pachterbeke4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Université catholique de Louvain),
Johannes Keller22
Estimated H-index: 22
(University of Ulm),
Vassilis Saroglou26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Université catholique de Louvain)
Being open to questioning and changing one’s own existential beliefs and worldviews is an understudied epistemological tendency we call “existential quest.” We found that existential quest is a specific construct that can be distinguished from related constructs such as searching for meaning in life, readiness to question proreligious beliefs (i.e., religious quest), need for closure, and dogmatism. In five studies, we tested the psychometric qualities of a newly developed 9-item scale and the r...
11 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 2, 2015in Journal of Genetic Psychology 0.92
Laura B. Koenig7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Kutztown University of Pennsylvania)
ABSTRACTThe author investigated the change and stability of different aspects of religiousness and spirituality, as well as whether personality traits may help explain why individuals increase or decrease in religiousness and spirituality during emerging adulthood. Self-report measures of childhood and current religiousness were completed by 224 college-aged participants. A subset of participants also completed a measure of personality and measures of religious and spiritual belief trajectories ...
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Political Psychology 2.78
Lucian Gideon Conway17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Montana),
Laura Janelle Gornick4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Roanoke College)
+ 4 AuthorsKevin McCue1
Estimated H-index: 1
(University of Montana)
Prior research suggests that liberals are more complex than conservatives. However, it may be that liberals are not more complex in general, but rather only more complex on certain topic domains (while conservatives are more complex in other domains). Four studies (comprised of over 2,500 participants) evaluated this idea. Study 1 involves the domain specificity of a self-report questionnaire related to complexity (dogmatism). By making only small adjustments to a popularly used dogmatism scale,...
33 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 21, 1960
Milton Rokeach30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Michigan State University)
2,137 Citations
Published on Jul 1, 2002in Mental Health, Religion & Culture
Vassilis Saroglou26
Estimated H-index: 26
(University College London)
Our theoretical assumption is that behind the dogmatism-religion positive but not systematic relation, a clearer one may exist between religion and need for closure (Webster & Kruglanski, 1994). A positive association of religiosity with need for closure was hypothesized (except with the decisiveness facet). Subjects ( n = 239) were administered the Need for Closure Scale (NFCS), the Religious Fundamentalism Scale and a two-dimensional religiosity scale. Religious fundamentalism was positively c...
76 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 25, 1993
Jack T. Hanford1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
C. Daniel Batson59
Estimated H-index: 59
+ 1 AuthorsW. Larry Ventis4
Estimated H-index: 4
What leads a person to become religious? What happens psychologically in a religious experience? Does religion make a person happier, more open, more psychologically healthy, more tolerant, more caring? Bold and thoughtful, this book employs social-psychological theories and research to build an understanding of the source, nature and consequences of religion in individual life. The authors' goal is to provide an integrated and coherent perspective, one that honours the diversity and mystery of ...
726 Citations
Published on Nov 26, 2014in Mental Health, Religion & Culture
Christopher F. Silver6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Tennessee),
Thomas Joseph Coleman2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Tennessee at Chattanooga)
+ 1 AuthorsJenny M. Holcombe2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Tennessee at Chattanooga)
Extensive research has been conducted in exploration of the American religious landscape; however, only recently has social science research started to explore nonbelief in any detail. Research on nonbelief has been limited as most research focuses on the popularity of the religious “nones” or the complexities of alternative faith expressions such as spirituality. Through two studies, one qualitative and one quantitative, this research explored how nonbelievers’ self-identify. Study 1 (the quali...
17 Citations Source Cite
Cited By4
Published on Aug 1, 2018in Psychology of Religion and Spirituality 1.66
Thomas Joseph Coleman2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Ralph W. Hood29
Estimated H-index: 29
(University of Tennessee at Chattanooga),
Heinz Streib12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Bielefeld University)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2018in SAGE Open
Shannon C. Houck9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Syracuse University),
Lucian Gideon Conway17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Montana)
+ 2 AuthorsJoeann M. Salvati1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Syracuse University)
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 2, 2018in the Journal of Beliefs and Values
Steven V. Rouse12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Pepperdine University)
ABSTRACTPrevious research has demonstrated that Christians living in Korea and Christians living in the US differ in their perceptions of Jesus, in a manner that is aligned with cultural values. The present study examined differences in the perception of Jesus within the US, examining agnostics, atheists, Catholics and nondenominational Christians, specifically assessing perceptions of his personality traits and moral foundations. Differences were observed between Christian groups and religiousl...
Source Cite
Published on Oct 2, 2018in Psychological Inquiry 26.36
Kimberly Rios8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Ohio University),
Zachary C. Roth (Ohio University)
Source Cite