Branding/Logomark minus Citation Combined Shape Icon/Bookmark-empty Icon/Copy Icon/Collection Icon/Close Copy 7 no author result Created with Sketch. Icon/Back Created with Sketch. Match!

Are atheists undogmatic

Published on Oct 1, 2017in Personality and Individual Differences 2.00
· DOI :10.1016/j.paid.2017.04.046
Filip Uzarevic1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UCL: Université catholique de Louvain),
Vassilis Saroglou27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UCL: Université catholique de Louvain),
Magali Clobert5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Stanford University)
Cite
Abstract
Abstract Previous theory and evidence favor the idea that religious people tend to be dogmatic to some extent whereas non-religious people are undogmatic: the former firmly hold beliefs, some of which are implausible or even contrary to the real world evidence. We conducted a further critical investigation of this idea, distinguishing three aspects of rigidity: (1) self-reported dogmatism, defined as unjustified certainty vs. not standing for any beliefs, (2) intolerance of contradiction, measured through (low) endorsement of contradictory statements, and (3) low readiness to take a different from one's own perspective, measured through the myside bias technique. Non-believers, at least in Western countries where irreligion has become normative, should be lower on the first, but higher on the other two constructs. Data collected from three countries (UK, France, and Spain, total N  = 788) and comparisons between Christians, atheists, and agnostics confirmed the expectations, with agnostics being overall similar to atheists.
  • References (37)
  • Citations (4)
Cite
References37
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2017in Group Processes & Intergroup Relations 2.64
Magali Clobert5
Estimated H-index: 5
(National Fund for Scientific Research),
Vassilis Saroglou27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UCL: Université catholique de Louvain),
Kwang-KuoHwang23
Estimated H-index: 23
(NTU: National Taiwan University)
Accumulated research has shown that Western Christian religiosity often predicts prejudice toward various kinds of outgroups. On the contrary, initial recent evidence indicates that East Asian religiosity predicts tolerance of various outgroups--except atheists. To understand these differences, we investigated cognitive (intolerance of contradiction) and emotional (disgust) mechanisms possibly mediating the link between religiosity and prejudice vs. tolerance. In Study 1 (295 Westerners of Chris...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2017in British Journal of Psychology 3.31
Małgorzata Kossowska16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Jagiellonian University),
Aneta Czernatowicz-Kukuczka4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Jagiellonian University),
Maciej Sekerdej4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Jagiellonian University)
In this article, we suggest that dogmatic beliefs, manifested as strong beliefs that there is no God (i.e., dogmatic atheism) as well as strong beliefs in God (i.e., religious orthodoxy), can serve as a cognitive response to uncertainty. Moreover, we claim that people who dogmatically do not believe in religion and those who dogmatically believe in religion are equally prone to intolerance and prejudice towards groups that violate their important values. That is because prejudice towards these g...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017
Chris G. Sibley39
Estimated H-index: 39
,
Fiona Kate Barlow19
Estimated H-index: 19
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017
Ben K. L. Ng2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Will M. Gervais1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsFiona Kate Barlow19
Estimated H-index: 19
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 5.92
Mark J. Brandt20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Daryl R. Van Tongeren20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Hope College)
[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 112(1) of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (see record 2016-61714-004). In the article, the sample size of N = 5,806 in the abstract is incorrect. The correct sample size is N = 6,047.] Research linking religion to prejudice suggests that highly religious individuals, and religious fundamentalists specifically, may be especially susceptible to expressing prejudice toward dissimilar others, whereas people who are less...
26 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Political Psychology 3.17
Lucian Gideon Conway19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UM: University of Montana),
Laura Janelle Gornick4
Estimated H-index: 4
(Roanoke College)
+ 4 AuthorsKevin McCue1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UM: University of Montana)
Prior research suggests that liberals are more complex than conservatives. However, it may be that liberals are not more complex in general, but rather only more complex on certain topic domains (while conservatives are more complex in other domains). Four studies (comprised of over 2,500 participants) evaluated this idea. Study 1 involves the domain specificity of a self-report questionnaire related to complexity (dogmatism). By making only small adjustments to a popularly used dogmatism scale,...
33 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 2, 2016in Thinking & Reasoning 2.34
Jennifer Vonk17
Estimated H-index: 17
(EMU: Eastern Michigan University),
Jerrica Pitzen2
Estimated H-index: 2
(EMU: Eastern Michigan University)
ABSTRACTResearchers have suggested that religious individuals engage primarily in intuitive over analytic processing. We investigated a connection between specific aspects of religiosity and the attribution of causation to social and physical events. College undergraduates completed measures of religiosity online and were asked to determine the causes of events that varied in type, outcome, and likelihood, as well as the personality characteristics of the protagonist. Individuals with greater in...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 2, 2015in Journal of Genetic Psychology 0.82
Laura B. Koenig7
Estimated H-index: 7
(KU: Kutztown University of Pennsylvania)
ABSTRACTThe author investigated the change and stability of different aspects of religiousness and spirituality, as well as whether personality traits may help explain why individuals increase or decrease in religiousness and spirituality during emerging adulthood. Self-report measures of childhood and current religiousness were completed by 224 college-aged participants. A subset of participants also completed a measure of personality and measures of religious and spiritual belief trajectories ...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on May 1, 2015in Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 1.27
Andrew R. Lewis6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UC: University of Cincinnati),
Paul A. Djupe18
Estimated H-index: 18
(Denison University)
+ 1 AuthorsJoshua Su-Ya Wu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(OSU: Ohio State University)
Social science researchers have increasingly come to utilize Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) to obtain adult, opt-in samples for use with experiments. Based on the demographic characteristics of MTurk samples, studies have provided some support for the representativeness of MTurk. Others have warranted caution based on demographic characteristics and comparisons of reliability. Yet, what is missing is an examination of the most glaring demographic difference in MTurk—religion. We compare five M...
14 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Psychology of Religion and Spirituality 1.83
Jon T. Moore1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Mark M. Leach17
Estimated H-index: 17
(University of Louisville)
Religiousness has frequently been found to be associated with higher reported mental health levels than those found in individuals lower in reported religiousness. These results have often been inferred by scholars to mean that secular groups have poorer levels of mental health despite the fact that secular populations have rarely been included in studies. In this study, an ideologically diverse sample of 4,667 respondents was included to determine the relationships among general dogmatism level...
5 Citations Source Cite
Cited By4
Newest
Published on Oct 2, 2018in the Journal of Beliefs and Values
Steven V. Rouse12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Pepperdine University)
ABSTRACTPrevious research has demonstrated that Christians living in Korea and Christians living in the US differ in their perceptions of Jesus, in a manner that is aligned with cultural values. The present study examined differences in the perception of Jesus within the US, examining agnostics, atheists, Catholics and nondenominational Christians, specifically assessing perceptions of his personality traits and moral foundations. Differences were observed between Christian groups and religiousl...
Source Cite
Published on Oct 2, 2018in Psychological Inquiry 10.27
Kimberly Rios9
Estimated H-index: 9
(OU: Ohio University),
Zachary C. Roth (OU: Ohio University)
Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2018in Psychology of Religion and Spirituality 1.83
Thomas Joseph Coleman4
Estimated H-index: 4
,
Ralph W. Hood30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UTC: University of Tennessee at Chattanooga),
Heinz Streib14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Bielefeld University)
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2018in SAGE Open
Shannon C. Houck9
Estimated H-index: 9
(SU: Syracuse University),
Lucian Gideon Conway19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UM: University of Montana)
+ 2 AuthorsJoeann M. Salvati1
Estimated H-index: 1
(SU: Syracuse University)
Stereotypical views cast religious believers as closed-minded, unthinking individuals, and irreligious persons as comparatively more intellectual and complex. But are these perceptions accurate? To investigate, three studies assessed differences between religious and irreligious thinking on Integrative Complexity (IC). In Study 1, six atheist–Christian opponents were selected for IC. Findings revealed that Christians were significantly more complex than their atheist counterparts overall, but va...
1 Citations Source Cite