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Response to: Phylogenetic placement, developmental trajectories and evolutionary implications of a feathered dinosaur tail in Mid-Cretaceous amber

Published on Mar 1, 2017in Current Biology 9.25
· DOI :10.1016/j.cub.2017.02.023
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsPhilip J. Currie50
Estimated H-index: 50
(University of Alberta)
Abstract
Summary In his correspondence, Markus Lambertz [1] raises some concerns about the phylogenetic placement and feather development of DIP-V-15103, the amber-entombed tail section that we recently reported [2] as fragmentary remains of a non-pygostylian coelurosaur (likely within the basal part of Coelurosauria). We here would like to respond to these concerns.
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Published on Mar 1, 2017in Current Biology 9.25
Markus Lambertz6
Estimated H-index: 6
(University of Bonn)
Summary In a recent report in Current Biology , Xing and colleagues [1] present a small fragment of a vertebrate tail preserved in amber that bears integumentary appendages (DIP-V-15103, Dexu Institute of Paleontology, Chaozhou, China; Figure 1). Following several analyses using cutting-edge technology the authors conclude that: the tail belongs to a non-avian theropod dinosaur (non-avialan according to the authors, but non-avian used synonymously here); the dinosaur most likely was a member of ...
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Published on Dec 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.25
Lida Xing18
Estimated H-index: 18
(China University of Geosciences),
Ryan C. McKellar5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Regina)
+ 11 AuthorsAlexander P. Wolfe47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Alberta)
Summary In the two decades since the discovery of feathered dinosaurs [1–3], the range of plumage known from non-avialan theropods has expanded significantly, confirming several features predicted by developmentally informed models of feather evolution [4–10]. However, three-dimensional feather morphology and evolutionary patterns remain difficult to interpret, due to compression in sedimentary rocks [9, 11]. Recent discoveries in Cretaceous amber from Canada, France, Japan, Lebanon, Myanmar, an...
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Published on Nov 1, 2010in Nature 41.58
Richard O. Prum46
Estimated H-index: 46
(American Museum of Natural History)
The transformation of neutral hydrogen located in the intergalactic medium into an ionized state was a major event in early cosmic history. The sensitive observations now possible with the Wide Field Camera 3, installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009, have revealed a population of galaxies at redshifts of z >7, corresponding to a period when the Universe was only about 800 million years old. In a Review, Robertson et al. discuss the picture of events in the early Universe that is em...
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Published on Apr 1, 2010in Nature 41.58
Xing Xu41
Estimated H-index: 41
,
Xiaoting Zheng15
Estimated H-index: 15
(Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Hai-Lu You20
Estimated H-index: 20
Study of two specimens of the feathered dinosaur Similicaudipteryx shows that the morphology of dinosaur feathers changed dramatically as the animals matured. Moreover, the morphology of feathers in dinosaurs was much more varied than one would expect from looking at feathers in modern birds.
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