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Resilient Adaptation Among At‐Risk Children: Harnessing Science Toward Maximizing Salutary Environments

Published on Mar 1, 2017in Child Development5.02
· DOI :10.1111/cdev.12737
Suniya S. Luthar46
Estimated H-index: 46
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Nancy Eisenberg4
Estimated H-index: 4
(ASU: Arizona State University)
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Abstract
Compiled in this Special Section are recommendations from multiple experts on how to maximize resilience among children at risk for maladjustment. Contributors delineated processes with relatively strong effects and modifiable by behavioral interventions. Commonly highlighted was fostering the well-being of caregivers via regular support, reduction of maltreatment while promoting positive parenting, and strengthening emotional self-regulation of caregivers and children. In future work, there must be more attention to developing and testing interventions within real-world settings (not just in laboratories) and to ensuring feasibility in procedures, costs, and assessments involved. Such movement will require shifts in funding priorities—currently focused largely on biological processes—toward maximizing the benefits from large-scale, empirically supported intervention programs for today's at-risk youth and families.
  • References (63)
  • Citations (24)
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References63
Newest
Published on May 1, 2017in Womens Health Issues1.96
Suniya S. Luthar46
Estimated H-index: 46
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Alexandria S. Curlee2
Estimated H-index: 2
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 2 AuthorsCynthia M. Stonnington14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Mayo Clinic)
Abstract Background We report on effects of an intervention to foster resilience among professional women at high risk for stress and burnout: health care providers (physicians, PhD clinicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners) who are mothers. Methods Between February and November 2015, 40 mothers on staff at the Mayo Clinic, Arizona, were assigned randomly to either 1) 12 weekly 1-hour sessions of a structured, relational supportive intervention, the Authentic Connections Groups (...
Holly A. Swartz30
Estimated H-index: 30
(University of Pittsburgh),
Jill M. Cyranowski27
Estimated H-index: 27
(University of Pittsburgh)
+ 7 AuthorsEllen Frank96
Estimated H-index: 96
(University of Pittsburgh)
Objective Two-generation studies demonstrate that treating maternal depression benefits school-age children. Although mothers prefer psychotherapy to medication, little is known about how psychotherapy for maternal depression affects offspring, especially in very high-risk families in which both mothers and children concurrently meet syndromal criteria for psychiatric disorders. This trial evaluated the effects of 2 brief psychotherapies for maternal depression on very high-risk families. Method...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Translational behavioral medicine2.24
Anthony Biglan51
Estimated H-index: 51
(Oregon Research Institute),
Michael E. Levin6
Estimated H-index: 6
(USU: Utah State University)
The success of translational research can ultimately be judged by the degree to which it reduces the incidence and prevalence of psychological, behavioral, and physical disorders and the major factors influencing them. In our view, we currently place insufficient emphasis on assessing our impact on the social determinants of disorders. As a result, we are failing to affect the incidence and prevalence of critical disorders. Moreover, translational research fails to take into account the full ran...
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Developmental Psychology3.34
Suniya S. Luthar46
Estimated H-index: 46
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Lucia Ciciolla8
Estimated H-index: 8
(ASU: Arizona State University)
The central question we addressed was whether mothers’ adjustment might vary systematically by the developmental stages of their children. In an internet-based study of over 2,200 mostly well-educated mothers with children ranging from infants to adults, we examined multiple aspects of mothers’ personal well-being, parenting, and perceptions of their children. Uniformly, adjustment indices showed curvilinear patterns across children’s developmental stages, with mothers of middle-schoolers faring...
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Journal of Youth and Adolescence3.26
Gian Vittorio Caprara46
Estimated H-index: 46
,
Bernadette Paula Luengo Kanacri10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UC: Pontifical Catholic University of Chile)
+ 2 AuthorsConcetta Pastorelli33
Estimated H-index: 33
Prosocial behaviors are considered integral to intervention goals that seek to promote successful youth development. This study examines the effect of a school- based intervention program entirely designed to promote prosocial behaviors called Promoting Prosocial and Emo- tional Skills to Counteract Externalizing Problems in Adolescence (Italian acronym CEPIDEA). The CEPIDEA curriculum was incorporated into routine educational practices and included five major components that reflect the persona...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Development and Psychopathology3.59
Nancy Eisenberg95
Estimated H-index: 95
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Zoe E. Taylor11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Purdue University)
+ 1 AuthorsTracy L. Spinrad43
Estimated H-index: 43
(ASU: Arizona State University)
At approximately 30, 42, and 54 months of age ( N = 231), the relations among children's externalizing symptoms, intrusive maternal parenting, and children's effortful control (EC) were examined. Both intrusive parenting and low EC have been related to psychopathology, but children's externalizing problems and low EC might affect the quality of parenting and one another. Mothers’ intrusive behavior with their children was assessed with observations, children's EC was measured with mothers’ and c...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Perspectives on Psychological Science8.19
Bethany A. Teachman35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UVA: University of Virginia),
Michael I. Norton43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Harvard University),
Barbara A. Spellman23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UVA: University of Virginia)
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Perspectives on Psychological Science8.19
Cass R. Sunstein87
Estimated H-index: 87
(Harvard University)
Published on Oct 2, 2015in Research in Human Development1.38
Richard A. Settersten9
Estimated H-index: 9
(OSU: Oregon State University),
Megan M. McClelland30
Estimated H-index: 30
(OSU: Oregon State University)
If you had just one wish for the study of human development, what would it be? How would it advance the field? And what would it take for your vision to be realized? This was the charge given to 28 scholars who come from different disciplines and fields, and who study different periods of the life course. In this article, Richard A. Settersten, Jr. and Megan McClelland, the issue’s editors, provide an overview of the contributors’ wishes, organized into seven thematic areas: (1) conceptual advan...
Published on Oct 2, 2015in Research in Human Development1.38
Richard M. Lerner76
Estimated H-index: 76
(Tufts University)
Genetic reductionist ideas, whether found in behavior genetics or in its methods (e.g., heritability analysis), human sociobiology, the Five Factor Theory of personality traits, or evolutionary psychology, share several egregious flaws, including problems of logic and of relying on using a counterfactual conception of genetic processes. These ideas constitute bad science and problematic bases for applications to programs and policies. I discuss the use of theories and methods derived from the re...
Cited By24
Newest
Published on Mar 13, 2019in Journal of Adolescent Research2.07
Sadiyya Haffejee1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Linda C. Theron5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pretoria)
In this article we explore how individual expressions of agency are shaped by structural factors and exercised by Black African girls with child sexual abuse (CSA) histories as they navigate resili...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Sex Roles2.28
Lucia Ciciolla8
Estimated H-index: 8
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater),
Suniya S. Luthar46
Estimated H-index: 46
(ASU: Arizona State University)
We address the issue of invisible labor in the home by examining how the distribution of the mental and emotional labor inherent in managing the household between spouses may be linked with women’s well-being, including their satisfaction with life, partner satisfaction, feelings of emptiness, and experiencing role overload. In a sample of 393 U.S. married/partnered mothers, mostly of upper-middle class backgrounds with dependent children at home, results showed that a majority of women reported...
Linda C. Theron5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pretoria),
Angelique van Rensburg5
Estimated H-index: 5
(NWU: North-West University)
ABSTRACTThis article’s purpose is directed by three, previously unanswered questions. First, which parent-figures (i.e., biological and social parents), if any, do adolescents from two disadvantage...
Published on Feb 21, 2018in Child Development5.02
J. J. Cutuli17
Estimated H-index: 17
(RU: Rutgers University),
Janette E. Herbers14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Villanova University)
Published on Sep 1, 2019in The Journal of Pediatrics3.74
Benard P. Dreyer32
Estimated H-index: 32
(NYU: New York University)
Published on Oct 2, 2018in South African Journal of Psychology0.78
Linda C. Theron5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Pretoria)
In this article, I argue that an ecological systems approach to resilience – specifically, one that is sensitive to how contextual determinants shape successful adaptation differentially – offers a meaningful way to enable sub-Saharan adolescents to adapt well to the apparently intractable risks to their health and well-being. Accordingly, I draw on studies of child and adolescent resilience from sub-Saharan Africa and the global North to show that the resilience field has largely moved beyond i...
Maryam Kia-Keating6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara),
Miya L. Barnett8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)
+ 2 AuthorsAndria B. Ruth
Published on Jul 1, 2019in Behaviour Research and Therapy4.31
Saul A. Castro1
Estimated H-index: 1
(ASU: Arizona State University),
Frank J. Infurna15
Estimated H-index: 15
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 2 AuthorsEva Zautra
Abstract One pathway linking experiences of childhood trauma to poorer mental and physical health in midlife are disruptions in daily socio-emotional regulation. However, there is a dearth of effective and accessible treatments that meet the needs of trauma-exposed individuals and their communities. Through a randomized controlled trial, this research examines whether an online social intelligence training (SIT) program improves social-emotional regulation compared to an attention-control (AC) c...
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Journal of Child and Family Studies1.56
Meredith A. Gruhn6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Alexandra H. Bettis7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 4 AuthorsBruce E. Compas67
Estimated H-index: 67
Objectives The ability to experience, express, and maintain positive emotions and reduce negative emotions during stress has been cited as a marker of resilience, yet much needs to be learned regarding what mechanisms underlie this ability in youth. The current study assesses relations between coping strategies and observed emotion expression and maintenance in offspring of depressed mothers as possible mechanisms to promote resilience.
Published on May 1, 2019in Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology1.83
Janette E. Herbers14
Estimated H-index: 14
(Villanova University),
J. J. Cutuli17
Estimated H-index: 17
(RU: Rutgers University)
+ 2 AuthorsTiffany Kichline1
Estimated H-index: 1
(KU: University of Kansas)
Abstract Risk factors in early childhood tend to co-occur and accumulate over time in complex patterns. Person-centered methods enable nuanced understanding of developmental processes of risk and resilience. With longitudinal data on 3398 children from the Fragile Families study, we utilized latent class analysis to identify profiles of psychosocial risk in early childhood in relation to profiles of middle childhood functioning. Results revealed five classes of risk, including one class of low r...
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