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Evidence-based medicine in the era of social media: Scholarly engagement through participation and online interaction

Published on Jan 1, 2018in Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine1.829
· DOI :10.1017/cem.2016.407
Teresa M. Chan17
Estimated H-index: 17
(McMaster University),
N. Seth Trueger11
Estimated H-index: 11
(NU: Northwestern University)
+ 1 AuthorsBrent Thoma16
Estimated H-index: 16
(U of S: University of Saskatchewan)
Sources
Abstract
The integration of new knowledge into clinical practice continues to lag behind discovery. The use of Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM) has disrupted communication between emergency physicians, making it easy for practicing clinicians to interact with colleagues from around the world to discuss the latest and highest impact research. FOAM has the potential to decrease the knowledge translation gap, but the concerns raised about its growing influence are 1) research that is translated too quickly may cause harm if its findings are incorrect; 2) there is little editorial oversight of online material; and 3) eminent online individuals may develop an outsized influence on clinical practice. We propose that new types of scholars are emerging to moderate the changing landscape of knowledge translation: 1) critical clinicians who critically appraise research in the same way that lay reviewers critique restaurants; 2) translational teachers adept with these new technologies who will work with researchers to disseminate their findings effectively; and 3) interactive investigators who engage with clinicians to ensure that their findings resonate and are applied at the bedside. The development of these scholars could build on the promise of evidence-based medicine by enhancing the appraisal and translation of research in practice.
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  • References (17)
  • Citations (31)
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References17
Newest
#1Daniel SidalakH-Index: 1
#2Eve PurdyH-Index: 5
Last. Teresa M. ChanH-Index: 17
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ProblemPublishing in academic journals is challenging for learners. Those who pass the initial stages of internal review by an editor often find the anonymous peer review process harsh. Academic blogs offer alternate avenues for publishing medical education material. Many blogs, however, lack a peer
17 CitationsSource
#1Teresa Man-Yee Chan (McMaster University)H-Index: 1
#2Andrew Grock (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 1
Last. Michelle Lin (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 18
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Study objective Since 2014, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) has used the Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) score to critically appraise online content. The primary goals of this study are to determine the interrater reliability (IRR) of the ALiEM AIR rating score and determine its correlation with expert educator gestalt. We also determine the minimum number of educator-raters needed to achieve acceptable reliability. Methods Eight educators each rated 83 online educational post...
26 CitationsSource
#2Brent ThomaH-Index: 16
Last. Chris BondH-Index: 3
view all 4 authors...
7 CitationsSource
#1Michelle LinH-Index: 18
#2Nikita JoshiH-Index: 6
Last. Lalena M. YarrisH-Index: 13
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ABSTRACT Background Emergency medicine (EM) residency programs can provide up to 20% of their planned didactic experiences asynchronously through the Individualized Interactive Instruction (III) initiative. Although blogs and podcasts provide potential material for III content, programs often struggle with identifying quality online content. Objective To develop and implement a process to curate quality EM content on blogs and podcasts for resident education and III credit. Methods We developed ...
19 CitationsSource
#1Teresa M. ChanH-Index: 17
#2Brent ThomaH-Index: 16
Last. Kulamakan KulasegaramH-Index: 13
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Author(s): Chan, MD, MHPE, Teresa M.; Thoma, MD, MA, Brent; Krishnan, BHSc, Keeth; Lin, MD, Michelle; Carpenter, MD, MSc, Christopher R.; Astin, MD, Matt; Kulasegaram, PhD, Kulamakan | Abstract: Introduction: Online education resources (OERs) like blogs and podcasts frequently augment or replace traditional medical education resources such as textbooks and lectures. Trainees’ ability to evaluate these resources is poor, and no quality assessment aids have been developed to assist them. This stud...
17 CitationsSource
#1Brent Thoma (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 16
#2Rohit Mohindra (McGill University)H-Index: 4
Last. Teresa M. Chan (McMaster University)H-Index: 17
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#1Brent ThomaH-Index: 16
#2Jason L. SandersH-Index: 19
Last. Teresa M. ChanH-Index: 17
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Introduction: The number of educational resources created for emergency medicine and criticalcare (EMCC) that incorporate social media has increased dramatically. With no way to assess theirimpact or quality, it is challenging for educators to receive scholarly credit and for learners to identifyrespected resources. The Social Media index (SMi) was developed to help address this. Methods: We used data from social media platforms (Google PageRanks, Alexa Ranks, FacebookLikes, Twitter Followers, a...
46 CitationsSource
#1Brent ThomaH-Index: 16
#2Teresa M. ChanH-Index: 17
Last. Michelle LinH-Index: 18
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Emergency physicians are leaders in the ‘‘free open-access meducation’’ (FOAM) movement. The mandate of FOAM is to create open-access education and knowledge translation resources for trainees and practicing physicians (e.g., blogs, podcasts, and vodcasts). Critics of FOAM have suggested that because such resources can be easily published online without quality control mechanisms, unreviewed FOAM resources may be erroneous or biased. We present a new initiative to incorporate open, expert, peer ...
30 CitationsSource
#1Teresa M. Chan (McMaster University)H-Index: 17
#2Brent Thoma (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 16
Last. Michelle Lin (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 18
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© 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education. Journal clubs have an extensive history that dates back to the time of Sir William Osler. They provide a venue to discuss the latest medical literature among groups of peers and are an innovative method for translating knowledge into practice within individual institutions. With ...
32 CitationsSource
Cited By31
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#1Pawel Korzynski (Ad: INSEAD)H-Index: 5
#2Grzegorz Mazurek (Kozminski University)H-Index: 5
Last. Michael Haenlein (ESCP Europe)H-Index: 24
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Abstract In a similar way as consumers use social media to spread word-of-mouth about brands and firms, employees perform similar activities when posting company-related content on social media. Such posts can be of significant importance for future employees who use them as supposedly unbiased information of firm attractiveness. Hence better understanding such activity is a crucial element of many HR managers. In this study we rely on signaling theory to explore the relationships between corpor...
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#1Lauren A. Maggio (USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)H-Index: 12
#2Todd C. Leroux (Defense Health Agency)H-Index: 2
Last. Anthony R. Artino (USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)H-Index: 7
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Introduction Many medical education journals use Twitter to garner attention for their articles. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of tweeting on article page views and downloads. Methods The authors conducted a randomized trial using Academic Medicine articles published in 2015. Beginning in February through May 2018, one article per day was randomly assigned to a Twitter (case) or control group. Daily, an individual tweet was generated for each article in the Twitter group that...
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#1Jessica G.Y. Luc (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 8
#2Maral Ouzounian (TGH: Toronto General Hospital)H-Index: 14
Last. Mara B. Antonoff (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center)H-Index: 8
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Abstract Background The Thoracic Surgery Social Media Network (TSSMN) is a social media collaborative formed in 2015 by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery and The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery to bring social media attention to key publications from both journals and to highlight major accomplishments in the specialty. Our aim is to describe TSSMN's preliminary experience and lessons learned. Methods Twitter analytics was used to obtain information regarding the @TSSMN Twitter handl...
2 CitationsSource
#1Simon Carley (MMU: Manchester Metropolitan University)H-Index: 12
Edwards and Roland report an interesting natural experiment in the role of knowledge dissemination in the era of social media and free open access medical education (#FOAMed).1 In the opinion of many emergency medicine educationalists, #FOAMed resources are challenging and changing our traditional models of sharing knowledge through publications such as the EMJ .2 The paper reports on two inadvertent publication errors on a UK #FOAMed blog. These were rapidly disseminated through social media to...
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#1Elena Sandalova (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 8
#2Julie G. Ledford (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 13
Last. Suzan Dijkstra (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 1
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Background: The integration of new scientific discoveries into clinical practice costs considerable time and resources. With the increased use of social media for scientific communication, new opportunities arise to ‘bridge the gap’ in translational medicine. The present study aimed to investigate how medical professionals access scientific information and understand their view on the role of social media in translational medicine. Methods: A questionnaire regarding (i) the use of social media f...
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Background Though the use of small bolus doses of vasopressors, termed “push dose pressors,” has become common in emergency medicine, data examining this practice are scant. Push dose pressors frequently involve bedside dilution, which may result in errors and adverse events. The objective of this study was to assess for instances of human error and adverse hemodynamic events during push dose pressor use in the emergency department.
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#1Amy KeirH-Index: 8
#2Nicolas A. Bamat (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)H-Index: 4
Last. Damian RolandH-Index: 10
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Social media is emerging as key solution to increase collaborative discourse between individuals, institutions and countries. Although evidence of social media’s impact on health policy is limited,1 its potential to promote knowledge dissemination and provide open forums for critical appraisal of evidence-based literature is increasingly clear.2 Social media in many ways is the definition of dissemination. It can be an active tool for spreading evidence-based information to a target audience (po...
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#1Lauren A. Maggio (USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)H-Index: 12
#2Todd C. Leroux (Defense Health Agency)H-Index: 2
Last. Anthony R. Artino (USU: Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)H-Index: 30
view all 3 authors...
Many medical education journals use Twitter to garner attention for their articles. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of tweeting on article page views and downloads. The authors conducted a randomized trial using Academic Medicine articles published in 2015. Beginning in February through May 2018, one article per day was randomly assigned to a Twitter (case) or control group. Daily, an individual tweet was generated for each article in the Twitter group that included the title, ...
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#1Paul Ross (La Trobe University)H-Index: 1
#2Rachel Cross (La Trobe University)H-Index: 2
The internet and social media have changed the way society communicates, requiring the nursing workforce to develop effective digital literacy skills and attain levels of e-professionalism. The int...
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#1Lynsey J. Martin (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 3
#2Alison Turnquist (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 1
Last. Jeroen J. G. van Merriënboer (UM: Maastricht University)H-Index: 57
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Abstract Purpose To investigate differences in (1) reader preference, (2) cognitive load during summary review, and (3) delayed information retention between infographic article summaries and traditional text-only research abstracts. Methods The three study outcomes were assessed using a two-phase within-subjects experiment. In phase 1, participants rated cognitive load as the mental effort they invested in reviewing eight article summaries (four in infographic format and four in text-only abstr...
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