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The Critique of Empirical Social Science: New Policies at Management and Organization Review

Published on Dec 1, 2016in Management and Organization Review 2.40
· DOI :10.1017/mor.2016.43
Arie Y. Lewin38
Estimated H-index: 38
(Duke University),
Chi-yue Chiu48
Estimated H-index: 48
(CUHK: The Chinese University of Hong Kong)
+ 4 AuthorsEric Wk Tsang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Texas at Austin)
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Abstract
At the June 2016 meeting of the International Association for Chinese Management Research, MOR organized a symposium to discuss the mounting criticisms of empirical social science and subsequent changes, as part of ongoing discussions affecting journal reviewing policies. This article overviews the history of modern empirical social science as the foundation of management, organization, and strategy research and the criticism of social science research, which has reached the point that some critics refer to current publication norms as encouraging and enabling the publication of junk science. Most importantly, however, this article outlines MOR's strategy going forward and the new reviewing initiatives that MOR is implementing as of Volume 13 (2017).
  • References (46)
  • Citations (16)
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References46
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Strategic Management Journal 5.57
Richard A. Bettis14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Constance E. Helfat33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Dartmouth College),
J. Myles Shaver26
Estimated H-index: 26
(UMN: University of Minnesota)
Research summary: A replication study assesses whether the results of a particular prior study can be reproduced, including in new contexts with different data. Replication studies are critical for building a cumulative body of research knowledge. This article discusses and provides a typology of different types of replications, compares replications with other approaches to cumulating knowledge, and provides guidelines toward producing high-quality replication studies. The articles in this Spec...
26 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Strategic Management Journal 5.57
Eric W. K. Tsang39
Estimated H-index: 39
(UTD: University of Texas at Dallas),
Junichi Yamanoi3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Waseda University)
Research summary: We use a sample of Singapore firms to replicate Barkema and Vermeulen's (1998) study of international expansion through start-ups or acquisitions by Dutch firms. We discover that the authors misinterpreted the regression coefficients for hypothesis testing and only two of their four hypotheses were actually tested. For these two hypotheses, one is not supported in either their study or ours, while the other is supported in their study but not ours. For the remaining two hypothe...
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2016in Strategic Management Journal 5.57
Sendil K. Ethiraj13
Estimated H-index: 13
(LBS: London Business School),
Alfonso Gambardella39
Estimated H-index: 39
(Bocconi University),
Constance E. Helfat33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Dartmouth College)
SMJ is committed to publishing high-quality replications on a regular basis. SMJ's overriding goal in publishing replications is to provide additional evidence that helps to build a cumulative body of knowledge in strategic management, not to overturn prior results. SMJ is interested in replications that accord with prior findings as well as those that do not. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
16 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 19, 2016
Eric W.K. Tsang1
Estimated H-index: 1
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Administrative Science Quarterly 8.02
William H. Starbuck35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UO: University of Oregon)
This essay proposes ways to improve editorial evaluations of manuscripts and to make published research more reliable and trustworthy. It points to troublesome properties of current editorial practices and suggests that editorial evaluations could become more reliable by making more allowance for reviewers’ human limitations. The essay also identifies some troublesome properties of prevalent methodology, such as statistical significance tests, HARKing, and p-Hacking, and proposes editorial polic...
31 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 2, 2016in The American Statistician 5.38
Ronald L. Wasserstein2
Estimated H-index: 2
(American Statistical Association),
Nicole A. Lazar1
Estimated H-index: 1
(American Statistical Association)
1,101 Citations Source Cite
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Administrative Science Quarterly 8.02
Stephen R. Barley35
Estimated H-index: 35
(UCSB: University of California, Santa Barbara)
This essay responds to, largely concurs with, and extends the concerns Jerry Davis expressed in his June 2015 editorial essay in ASQ about the state of research in organizational theory. In particular, it discusses the reasons novelty has become such a valued commodity in organizational theory and its unintended consequences. Fault lies with the way students are trained, the reward system that most universities implicitly or explicitly use to promote faculty, and the role that editors and review...
33 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Strategic Management Journal 5.57
Richard A. Bettis14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Sendil K. Ethiraj13
Estimated H-index: 13
(LBS: London Business School)
+ 2 AuthorsWill Mitchell49
Estimated H-index: 49
(Duke University)
75 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016
Anne Tsui1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Mendoza College of Business)
Purpose – Value-free science is an ideal that is neither possible nor desirable, especially for social sciences. The subject of social sciences is individuals and groups; hence social, moral, ethical, or political values are inherent and unavoidable in all steps of the scientific process. Further, the authority of science requires the scientist to be responsible experts in ensuring the reliability of knowledge and in assessing the risks in applying the research findings in social policies and pr...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2016in Strategic Management Journal 5.57
Brent Goldfarb12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UMD: University of Maryland, College Park),
Andrew A. King26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Dartmouth College)
Research summary: This article uses distributional matching and posterior predictive checks to estimate the extent of false and inflated findings in empirical research on strategic management. Based on a sample of 300 papers in top outlets for research on strategic management, we estimate that if each study were repeated, 24–40 percent of significant coefficients would become insignificant at the five percent level. Our best guess is that for about half of these, the true coefficient is very clo...
24 Citations Source Cite
Cited By16
Newest
Published on Jun 24, 2019in Management Research Review
Jesús de Frutos-Belizón (UCA: University of Cádiz), Fernando Martín-Alcázar7
Estimated H-index: 7
(UCA: University of Cádiz),
Gonzalo Sánchez-Gardey3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UCA: University of Cádiz)
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Published on Dec 1, 2018in Management and Organization Review 2.40
Sven Horak6
Estimated H-index: 6
This study provides an overview, categorization, and integration of what has been achieved in the niche of cross-culture experimental economics (CCEE) so far, aiming to inspire indigenous management researchers to extend their methodological toolbox by including experimental methods. As a result of the review, I find that most of the early studies lack depth and contextualization as well as detailed explanation about why human behavior differs. Hence, a better understanding about the influence o...
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Published on Oct 7, 2018
Charlotte Reypens1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Sheen S. Levine1
Estimated H-index: 1
Abstract Measuring behavior requires research methods that can capture observed outcomes and expose underlying processes and mechanisms. In this chapter, we present a toolbox of instruments and techniques we designed experimental tasks to simulate decision environments and capture behavior. We deployed protocol analysis and text analysis to examine the underlying cognitive processes. In combination, these can simultaneously grasp antecedents, outcomes, processes, and mechanisms. We applied them ...
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Published on Feb 1, 2018in Journal of World Business 5.79
Florian Bauer8
Estimated H-index: 8
(MCI Management Center Innsbruck),
Svante Schriber3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Stockholm University)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid R. King2
Estimated H-index: 2
(FSU: Florida State University)
There is general agreement that acquisition integration is decisive for acquisition performance. Despite this consensus, there are heterogeneous results on integration measures, such as integration speed with empirical research supporting the benefits of either fast or slow integration. We argue that the business environment surrounding acquisitions has the potential to reconcile conflicting findings. We develop how institutional factors (i.e., labor market flexibility and efficiency) influence ...
6 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2017in Strategic Management Journal 5.57
Sheen S. Levine9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UTD: University of Texas at Dallas),
Mark Bernard1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UTD: University of Texas at Dallas),
Rosemarie Nagel21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies)
Research summary: Pursuing sources of entrepreneurial and competitive advantage, researchers have been exploring cognition. We examine how cognitive capabilities affect competitive performance, drawing on two constructs rooted in psychology and economics. A familiar one is analytic skill, the ability to solve abstract problems. To that, we add strategic intelligence — the ability to anticipate competitors' behavior and preempt it. Using incentivized experiments, we measure the constructs in part...
9 Citations Source Cite