Match!

Methodology for High-Throughput Field Phenotyping of Canopy Temperature Using Airborne Thermography.

Published on Dec 6, 2016in Frontiers in Plant Science4.11
· DOI :10.3389/fpls.2016.01808
David M. Deery6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation),
Greg J. Rebetzke31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
+ 7 AuthorsRobert T. Furbank15
Estimated H-index: 15
(ANU: Australian National University)
Cite
Abstract
Lower canopy temperature (CT), resulting from increased stomatal conductance, has been associated with increased yield in wheat. Historically, CT has been measured with hand-held infrared thermometers. Using the hand-held CT method on large field trials is problematic, mostly because measurements are confounded by temporal weather changes during the time required to measure all plots. The hand-held CT method is laborious and yet the resulting heritability low, thereby reducing confidence in selection in large scale breeding endeavours. We have developed a reliable and scalable crop phenotyping method for assessing CT in large field experiments. The method involves airborne thermography from a manned helicopter using a radiometrically-calibrated thermal camera. Thermal image data is acquired from large experiments in the order of seconds, thereby enabling simultaneous measurement of CT on potentially 1,000s of plots. Effects of temporal weather variation when phenotyping large experiments using hand-held infrared thermometers are therefore reduced. The method is designed for cost-effective and large-scale use by the non-technical user and includes custom-developed software for data processing to obtain CT data on a single-plot basis for analysis. Broad-sense heritability was routinely greater than 0.50, and as high as 0.79, for airborne thermography CT measured near anthesis on a wheat experiment comprising 768 plots of size 2 x 6 m. Image analysis based on the frequency distribution of temperature pixels to remove the possible influence of background soil did not improve broad-sense heritability. Total image acquisition and processing time was ca. 25 min and required only one person (excluding the helicopter pilot). The results indicate the potential to phenotype CT on large populations in genetics studies or for selection within a plant breeding program.
  • References (44)
  • Citations (23)
Cite
References44
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2016in Precision Agriculture3.36
David Gómez-Candón5
Estimated H-index: 5
(INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique),
Nicolas Virlet4
Estimated H-index: 4
+ 2 AuthorsJean-Luc Regnard8
Estimated H-index: 8
Numerous agronomical applications of remote sensing have been proposed in recent years, including water stress assessment at field by thermal imagery. The miniaturization of thermal cameras allows carrying them onboard the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), but these systems have no temperature control and, consequently, drifts during data acquisition have to be carefully corrected. This manuscript presents a comprehensive methodology for radiometric correction of UAV remotely-sensed thermal image...
Published on Jul 31, 2014in Agronomy
Ankush Prashar12
Estimated H-index: 12
,
Hamlyn G. Jones39
Estimated H-index: 39
The improvements in crop production needed to meet the increasing food demand in the 21st Century will rely on improved crop management and better crop varieties. In the last decade our ability to use genetics and genomics in crop science has been revolutionised, but these advances have not been matched by our ability to phenotype crops. As rapid and effective phenotyping is the basis of any large genetic study, there is an urgent need to utilise the recent advances in crop scale imaging to deve...
Published on Jul 23, 2014in Agronomy
Hamlyn G. Jones39
Estimated H-index: 39
,
Xavier Sirault16
Estimated H-index: 16
The consequences of changes in spatial resolution for application of thermal imagery in plant phenotyping in the field are discussed. Where image pixels are significantly smaller than the objects of interest (e.g., leaves), accurate estimates of leaf temperature are possible, but when pixels reach the same scale or larger than the objects of interest, the observed temperatures become significantly biased by the background temperature as a result of the presence of mixed pixels. Approaches to the...
Published on Jul 10, 2014in Agronomy
David M. Deery6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
Jose Jimenez-Berni8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 2 AuthorsRobert T. Furbank15
Estimated H-index: 15
The achievements made in genomic technology in recent decades are yet to be matched by fast and accurate crop phenotyping methods. Such crop phenotyping methods are required for crop improvement efforts to meet expected demand for food and fibre in the future. This review evaluates the role of proximal remote sensing buggies for field-based phenotyping with a particular focus on the application of currently available sensor technology for large-scale field phenotyping. To illustrate the potentia...
Published on Jun 17, 2014in Agronomy
Scott C. Chapman48
Estimated H-index: 48
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation),
Torsten Merz13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
+ 7 AuthorsJose Jimenez-Berni8
Estimated H-index: 8
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
Plant breeding trials are extensive (100s to 1000s of plots) and are difficult and expensive to monitor by conventional means, especially where measurements are time-sensitive. For example, in a land-based measure of canopy temperature (hand-held infrared thermometer at two to 10 plots per minute), the atmospheric conditions may change greatly during the time of measurement. Such sensors measure small spot samples (2 to 50 cm 2 ), whereas image-based methods allow the sampling of entire plots (2...
Published on Apr 11, 2014in Agronomy
Richard Esten Mason1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CGIAR),
Ravi Singh1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UA: University of Arkansas)
Developing cultivars with improved adaptation to drought and heat stressed environments is a priority for plant breeders. Canopy temperature (CT) is a useful tool for phenotypic selection of tolerant genotypes, as it integrates many physiological responses into a single low-cost measurement. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of CT to predict grain yield within the flow of a wheat breeding program and assess its utility as a tool for indirect selection. CT was measured in b...
Published on Jan 1, 2014in Functional Plant Biology2.33
Greg J. Rebetzke31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation),
Ralph A. Fischer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
+ 4 AuthorsNeil A. Fettell6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UNE: University of New England (United States))
Genetic and physiological studies often comprise genotypes diverse in vigour, size and flowering time. This can make the phenotyping of complex traits challenging, particularly those associated with canopy development, biomass and yield, as the environment of one genotype can be influenced by a neighbouring genotype. Limited seed and space may encourage field assessment in single, spaced rows or in small, unbordered plots, whereas the convenience of a controlled environment or greenhouse makes p...
Published on Nov 1, 2013in Euphytica1.53
R. Esten Mason8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UA: University of Arkansas),
Dirk B. Hays14
Estimated H-index: 14
(A&M: Texas A&M University)
+ 2 AuthorsBhoja R. Basnet11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center)
A wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) recombinant inbred line (RIL) population was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with yield, yield components, and canopy temperature depression (CTD) under field conditions. The RIL population, consisting of 118 lines derived from a cross between the stress tolerant cultivar ‘Halberd’ and heat stress sensitive cultivar ‘Karl92’, was grown under optimal and late sown conditions to impose heat stress. Yield and yield components including biomas...
Published on Jun 7, 2013in PLOS ONE2.78
Ankush Prashar12
Estimated H-index: 12
(James Hutton Institute),
Jane Yildiz1
Estimated H-index: 1
(James Hutton Institute)
+ 2 AuthorsHamlyn G. Jones39
Estimated H-index: 39
The rapid development of genomic technology has made high throughput genotyping widely accessible but the associated high throughput phenotyping is now the major limiting factor in genetic analysis of traits. This paper evaluates the use of thermal imaging for the high throughput field phenotyping of Solanum tuberosum for differences in stomatal behaviour. A large multi-replicated trial of a potato mapping population was used to investigate the consistency in genotypic rankings across different ...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Functional Plant Biology2.33
Greg J. Rebetzke31
Estimated H-index: 31
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation),
Karine Chenu24
Estimated H-index: 24
+ 6 AuthorsJ. E. Mayer2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Grains Research and Development Corporation)
Field evaluation of germplasm for performance under water and heat stress is challenging. Field environments are variable and unpredictable, and genotypeenvironment interactions are difficult to interpret if environments are not well characterised. Numerous traits, genes and quantitative trait loci have been proposed for improving performance but few have been used in variety development. This reflects the limited capacity of commercial breeding companies to screen for these traits and the absen...
Cited By23
Newest
Published on May 14, 2019in Journal of Experimental Botany5.36
Xiaoxi Li (CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation), Cathrine Heinz Ingvordsen1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
+ 4 AuthorsR. A. Richards52
Estimated H-index: 52
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
Published on Apr 26, 2019in New Phytologist7.30
Robert T. Furbank53
Estimated H-index: 53
(ANU: Australian National University),
Robert T. Furbank15
Estimated H-index: 15
(ANU: Australian National University)
+ 2 AuthorsDavid M. Deery6
Estimated H-index: 6
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
Plant phenotyping forms the core of crop breeding, allowing breeders to build on physiological traits and mechanistic science to inform their selection of material for crossing and genetic gain. Recent rapid progress in high-throughput techniques based on machine vision, robotics, and computing (plant phenomics) enables crop physiologists and breeders to quantitatively measure complex and previously intractable traits. By combining these techniques with affordable genomic sequencing and genotypi...
Pengcheng Hu1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAU: China Agricultural University),
Wei Guo5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UTokyo: University of Tokyo)
+ 2 AuthorsBangyou Zheng13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
Abstract Image analysis using proximal sensors can help accelerate the selection process in plant breeding and improve the breeding efficiency. However, the accuracies of extracted phenotypic traits, especially those that require image classification, are affected by the pixel size in images. Ground coverage (GC), the ratio of projected to ground vegetation area to total land area, is a simple and important trait to monitor crop growth and development and is often captured by visual-spectrum cam...
Published on Jun 3, 2019in Frontiers in Plant Science4.11
Zhao Chunjiang20
Estimated H-index: 20
,
Ying Zhang1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 5 AuthorsJiangchuan Fan
Reliable, automatic, multifunctional, and high-throughput phenotypic technologies are increasingly considered important tools for rapid advancement of genetic gain in breeding programs. With the rapid development in high-throughput phenotyping technologies, research in this area is entering a new era called 'phenomics.' The crop phenotyping community not only needs to build a multi-domain, multi-level, and multi-scale crop phenotyping big database, but also to research technical systems for phen...
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Frontiers in Plant Science4.11
Zohaib Khan8
Estimated H-index: 8
(UniSA: University of South Australia),
Stanley J. Miklavcic11
Estimated H-index: 11
(UniSA: University of South Australia)
Unmanned aerial vehicles have an immense capacity for remote imaging of plants in agronomic field research trials. Traits extracted from the plots can explain development of the plants coverage, growth, flowering status and related phenomenon. An important prerequisite step to obtain such information is to find the exact position of plots to extract them from an orthomosaic image. Extraction of plots using tools which assume a uniform spacing is often erroneous because the plots may neither be p...
Published on May 25, 2019in Remote Sensing4.12
Adrian Gracia-Romero2
Estimated H-index: 2
,
Shawn C. Kefauver10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 3 AuthorsJ. L. Araus49
Estimated H-index: 49
Published on May 8, 2019in International Journal of Molecular Sciences4.18
R. A. C. N. Casari1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Dayane Silva de Paiva1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 9 AuthorsThiago Santos
The feasibility of thermography as a technique for plant screening aiming at drought-tolerance has been proven by its relationship with gas exchange, biomass, and yield. In this study, unlike most of the previous, thermography was applied for phenotyping contrasting maize genotypes whose classification for drought tolerance had already been established in the field. Our objective was to determine whether thermography-based classification would discriminate the maize genotypes in a similar way as...
Published on May 1, 2019in Plant Science3.79
Thomas Roitsch40
Estimated H-index: 40
(UCPH: University of Copenhagen),
Llorenç Cabrera-Bosquet15
Estimated H-index: 15
(SupAgro)
+ 4 AuthorsEric Ober3
Estimated H-index: 3
(National Institute of Agricultural Botany)
Abstract At the 4th International Plant Phenotyping Symposium meeting of the International Plant Phenotyping Network (IPPN) in 2016 at CIMMYT in Mexico, a workshop was convened to consider ways forward with sensors for phenotyping. The increasing number of field applications provides new challenges and requires specialised solutions. There are many traits vital to plant growth and development that demand phenotyping approaches that are still at early stages of development or elude current capabi...
Published on May 1, 2019in Plant Science3.79
Daniel Reynolds3
Estimated H-index: 3
,
Frédéric Baret56
Estimated H-index: 56
(INRA: Institut national de la recherche agronomique)
+ 10 AuthorsKoji Noshita4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UTokyo: University of Tokyo)
Abstract Progress in remote sensing and robotic technologies decreases the hardware costs of phenotyping. Here, we first review cost-effective imaging devices and environmental sensors, and present a trade-off between investment and manpower costs. We then discuss the structure of costs in various real-world scenarios. Hand-held low-cost sensors are suitable for quick and infrequent plant diagnostic measurements. In experiments for genetic or agronomic analyses, (i) major costs arise from plant ...
View next paperPheno-Copter: A Low-Altitude, Autonomous Remote-Sensing Robotic Helicopter for High-Throughput Field-Based Phenotyping