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Evidence for social parasitism of early insect societies by Cretaceous rove beetles

Published on Dec 1, 2016in Nature Communications 11.88
· DOI :10.1038/ncomms13658
Shûhei Yamamoto8
Estimated H-index: 8
(Kyushu University),
Munetoshi Maruyama10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Kyushu University),
Joseph Parker9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Columbia University)
Cite
Abstract
Social insects are commonly parasitized by beetles that live inside colonies and consume nest resources or even the brood. Here, Yamamoto et al. present fossil evidence that social parasitism by beetles dates back at least 99 million years—contemporaneous with the earliest fossil indications of ant and termite eusociality.
  • References (47)
  • Citations (24)
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References47
Newest
Published on Sep 20, 2016in bioRxiv
Munetoshi Maruyama10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Kyushu University),
Joseph Parker9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Columbia University)
Recent adaptive radiations provide striking examples of convergence, but the predictability of evolution over much deeper timescales is controversial, due to a scarcity of ancient clades exhibiting repetitive patterns of phenotypic evolution. Army ants are ecologically dominant arthropod predators of the world9s tropics, with large nomadic colonies housing diverse communities of socially parasitic myrmecophiles. Remarkable among these are many species of rove beetle (Staphylinidae) that exhibit ...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 0.22
Rachel A. Arango3
Estimated H-index: 3
(USDA: United States Department of Agriculture),
Caroline S. Chaboo2
Estimated H-index: 2
(University of Nebraska State Museum)
ABSTRACT: A checklist of the ptinid beetles (including Anobiidae) of Peru is presented with 5 subfamilies, 22 genera, and 33 identified species. One species, Calymmaderus funki Pic, is reported as a new country record. Six genera are reported as new records for Peru (i.e. Byrrhodes, Caenocara, Mirosternus, Petalium, and Cryptorama), however, species within these genera are not yet identified. This contribution is part of the ‘Beetles of Peru’ project.
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Systematic Entomology 3.73
Joseph Parker9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Columbia University)
Pselaphinae is an exceptionally species-rich, globally distributed subfamily of minute rove beetles (Staphylinidae), many of which are inquilines of social insects. Deducing the factors that drove pselaphine diversification and their evolutionary predisposition to inquilinism requires a reliable timescale of pselaphine cladogenesis. Pselaphinae is split into a small and highly plesiomorphic supertribe, Faronitae, and its sister group, the ‘higher Pselaphinae’ – a vast multi-tribe clade with a mo...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2016in Cladistics 7.78
Pablo A. Goloboff31
Estimated H-index: 31
,
Santiago A. Catalano12
Estimated H-index: 12
Version 1.5 of the computer program TNT completely integrates landmark data into phylogenetic analysis. Landmark data consist of coordinates (in two or three dimensions) for the terminal taxa; TNT reconstructs shapes for the internal nodes such that the difference between ancestor and descendant shapes for all tree branches sums up to a minimum; this sum is used as tree score. Landmark data can be analysed alone or in combination with standard characters; all the applicable commands and options ...
299 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Molecular Ecology 5.86
Christoph von Beeren9
Estimated H-index: 9
(Rockefeller University),
Munetoshi Maruyama10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Kyushu University),
Daniel J. C. Kronauer23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Rockefeller University)
Army ants and their arthropod symbionts represent one of the most species-rich animal associations on Earth, and constitute a fascinating example of diverse host-symbiont interaction networks. However, despite decades of research, our knowledge of army ant symbionts remains fragmentary due to taxonomic ambiguity and the inability to study army ants in the laboratory. Here, we present an integrative approach that allows us to reliably determine species boundaries, assess biodiversity, match diffe...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.19
Phillip Barden6
Estimated H-index: 6
(RU: Rutgers University),
David A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(CUNY: City University of New York)
Summary Across terrestrial ecosystems, modern ants are ubiquitous. As many as 94 out of every 100 individual arthropods in rainforests are ants [1], and they constitute up to 15% of animal biomass in the Amazon [2, 3]. Moreover, ants are pervasive agents of natural selection as over 10,000 arthropod species are specialized inquilines or myrmecomorphs living among ants or defending themselves through mimicry [4, 5]. Such impact is traditionally explained by sociality: ants are the first major gro...
30 Citations Source Cite
Published on Feb 1, 2016in Current Biology 9.19
Michael S. Engel36
Estimated H-index: 36
(KU: University of Kansas),
Phillip Barden6
Estimated H-index: 6
(RU: Rutgers University)
+ 1 AuthorsDavid A. Grimaldi40
Estimated H-index: 40
(AMNH: American Museum of Natural History)
Summary A hallmark of animals that are eusocial, or those with advanced sociality, is reproductive specialization into worker and queen castes [1–3]. In the most derived societies, these divisions are essentially fixed and in some arthropods, include further specialization—a tripartite system with a soldier caste that defends the colony [1]. Eusociality has originated numerous times among insects but is believed to have appeared first in the termites (Isoptera), in the Early Cretaceous [4]. Howe...
24 Citations Source Cite
Published on Dec 1, 2015in Gondwana Research 6.48
Chenyang Cai13
Estimated H-index: 13
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Diying Huang18
Estimated H-index: 18
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract The subfamily Aleocharinae is a hyper-diverse group of Staphylinidae, accounting for nearly one-third of the diversity within the largest animal family on Earth. Here we describe Cretodeinopsis aenigmatica gen. et sp. nov., the first definitive Mesozoic aleocharine based on a well-preserved individual in the earliest Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber from Myanmar (Burma). The new genus is clearly assigned to the ‘basal’ group of Aleocharinae based on its overall body shape, antennal in...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 9, 2015in Zootaxa 0.99
Richard A. B. Leschen21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Landcare Research),
Alfred F. Newton20
Estimated H-index: 20
(FMNH: Field Museum of Natural History)
A checklist of all identified species of the staphylinid subfamily Aleocharinae known to occur in New Zealand and associated outer islands (including the Kermadec, Chatham and Auckland Islands) is presented. Included for each species, and for synonyms known from New Zealand, is a reference to the original description, type locality and type depository, and for each species the known distribution within and outside New Zealand. Type material was sought and is summarized for all indigenous New Zea...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Apr 1, 2015in Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 0.22
Alfred F. Newton20
Estimated H-index: 20
(FMNH: Field Museum of Natural History)
Diversity in Peru: 17 subfamilies, 221 genera, 877 species (confirmed). Recognition: Staphylinidae or rove beetles range in size from 1–35 mm (most are 2–8 mm) and vary greatly in shape from very compact to extremely slender or even antlike, but most may be recognized by having more or less truncate elytra (exposing one to many abdominal tergites), six or seven visible abdominal sternites, and contiguous procoxae which vary in shape but are often prominent and conical. The antennae are usually 1...
9 Citations Source Cite
Cited By24
Newest
Published on Oct 30, 2018in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 2.31
Shûhei Yamamoto1
Estimated H-index: 1
(FMNH: Field Museum of Natural History),
Edilson Caron4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UFPR: Federal University of Paraná),
Sidnei Bortoluzzi2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UFPR: Federal University of Paraná)
Fossil records of piestine rove beetles are very limited, with only two definite species from Mesozoic Chinese compressions, a single taxon from mid-Eocene Baltic amber and a doubtful Oligocene compression fossil from France. Here, a remarkable new genus and species, Propiestus archaicus gen. et sp. nov., is described based on a well-preserved individual in Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber from northern Myanmar (Cenomanian, c. 99 Ma). It represents the first piestine fossil found in Mesozoic amber...
2 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 11, 2019in Systematic Entomology 3.73
Shûhei Yamamoto2
Estimated H-index: 2
(FMNH: Field Museum of Natural History),
Yui Takahashi1
Estimated H-index: 1
1 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 23, 2019in Palaeontology 2.63
Dagmara Żyła (University of Gdańsk), Shûhei Yamamoto2
Estimated H-index: 2
(FMNH: Field Museum of Natural History),
Josh Jenkins Shaw1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wild Center)
Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Ecological Entomology 2.07
Raul M. Pisno , Karen Salazar1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsOg DeSouza12
Estimated H-index: 12
Source Cite
Published on Apr 21, 2019
The present work reveals plant and animal associates of 16 families and subfamilies of fossil beetles that have been preserved in amber from Mexico, the Dominican Republic, and Myanmar. The associates include mites, pseudoscorpions, spiders, insect parasites and predators, fungi, angiosperm parts, vertebrates, and nematodes. The presence of these fossil associates can be attributed to the rapid preservation of organisms in resin, thus maintaining natural associations almost “in situ”. Examples o...
Source Cite
Published on Apr 16, 2019in eLife 7.55
Yu-Lingzi Zhou1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Adam Ślipiński7
Estimated H-index: 7
(CSIRO: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation)
+ 1 AuthorsJoseph Parker9
Estimated H-index: 9
(California Institute of Technology)
Many animals live lives that are closely intertwined with those of other species. While a clown fish sheltering within the tentacles of a sea anemone may be a textbook example, ‘symbiotic’ interactions that occur inside ant nests are among some of the most dramatic. Known as myrmecophiles – after the Greek for ‘ant lovers’, many insects, spiders and mites have evolved to live alongside ants in one way or another. Some of these animals display elaborate behaviors – like mouth-to-mouth feeding or ...
Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Systematic Entomology 3.73
Janina L. Kypke1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Wild Center),
Alexey Solodovnikov11
Estimated H-index: 11
(Wild Center)
+ 2 AuthorsDagmara Żyła5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Wild Center)
3 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2019in Biologia 0.73
Peter Vršanský1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Lucia Šmídová3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Charles University in Prague)
+ 14 AuthorsXiaojie Lei1
Estimated H-index: 1
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Myrmecophilous and termitophilous interactions likely contributed to the competitive advantage and evolutionary success of eusocial insects, but how these commensal and parasitic relationships originated is unclear due to absence of fossil records. New extinct cockroaches of the still living family Blattidae are reported here from the Cretaceous Myanmar amber (99 Ma) and are the earliest known inhabitants of complex ant nests, demonstrating that this specialised myrmecophily originated shortly a...
5 Citations Source Cite
Published on Oct 1, 2018in Cretaceous Research 2.12
Shûhei Yamamoto (Kyushu University), Vasily V. Grebennikov14
Estimated H-index: 14
(CFIA: Canadian Food Inspection Agency),
Yui Takahashi5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Tsukuba)
Abstract Featherwing beetles, or Ptiliidae (Coleoptera: Staphylinoidea), are characterized by their minute sized-body and peculiar hind wing structures, and include the smallest free-living insects. A half millimeter-long, unsexed adult featherwing beetle from Upper Cretaceous Burmese amber is here described as Kekveus jason gen. et sp. nov. Our observation recovered fine morphological details, such as the fringes of hind wings and pronotal grooves, from the Mesozoic Ptiliidae for the first time...
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Published on Aug 9, 2018in Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 2.31
Daran Zheng6
Estimated H-index: 6
(HKU: University of Hong Kong),
André Nel15
Estimated H-index: 15
(University of Paris)
+ 3 AuthorsBo Wang17
Estimated H-index: 17
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Amber inclusions have been studied for several centuries, but true dragonflies are extremely rare, with only several poorly preserved wings recorded. In Burmese amber, odonatans are relatively diverse, but true dragonflies are still rare. An excellently preserved true dragonfly, Burmagomphides electronica Zheng, Nel & Wang gen. et sp. nov., representing the new family Burmagomphidae Zheng, Nel & Wang fam. nov., is described here from Cretaceous Burmese amber. This is the first well-preserved tru...
9 Citations Source Cite