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Gender differences in cumulative life-course socioeconomic position and social mobility in relation to new onset diabetes in adults—the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

Published on Dec 1, 2016in Annals of Epidemiology2.55
· DOI :10.1016/j.annepidem.2016.09.014
Lidyane do Valle Camelo4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UFMG: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais),
Luana Giatti20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UFMG: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais)
+ 4 AuthorsSandhi Maria Barreto42
Estimated H-index: 42
(UFMG: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais)
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Abstract
Abstract Purpose We investigated gender-specific associations of cumulative socioeconomic position across life course and social mobility with new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) in over 12,000 civil servants in Brazil. Methods We used data from ELSA-Brasil baseline (2008–2010). The accumulation of risk was assessed using an education-based score and an occupation-based score. Educational and occupational social mobility were also evaluated. Results In minimally adjusted models, NODM increased with increasing exposure to life-course social disadvantages, especially in men. This gender difference was pronounced when cumulative processes were evaluated by education-based scores (high vs. low cumulative social disadvantage, odds ratio [OR] = 4.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.6–8.5 in men and OR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1–3.6 in women). After including proximal diabetes risk factors possibly acting as mediators, these associations remained high only in men (high vs. low cumulative social disadvantage, OR = 4.4; 95% CI: 2.4–8.1). Social mobility was associated with NODM in men. Compared to the high-stable trajectory, downward had greater associations than upward mobility. In women, when considering metabolic syndrome–related variables, changes in social hierarchy did not seem to have an influence on their risk of diabetes. Conclusions Accumulation of risk and social mobility were associated with NODM with gender-specific patterns, suggesting differences in mechanisms connecting life-course socioeconomic position and diabetes in men and women.
  • References (31)
  • Citations (1)
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References31
Newest
Published on Dec 1, 2015in BMC Public Health2.57
Js van Vliet2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Linköping University),
Per A. Gustafsson21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Linköping University)
+ 1 AuthorsNina Nelson20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Linköping University)
Background Overweight among children and adolescents related to social inequality, as well as age and gender differences, may contribute to poor self-image, thereby raising important public health concerns. This study explores social inequality in relation to overweight and perception of overweight among 263 boys and girls, age 7 to 17, in Vaxjo, Sweden.
Published on Sep 1, 2015in Social Science & Medicine3.09
Lidyane V. Camelo2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UFMG: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais),
Luana Giatti20
Estimated H-index: 20
(UFOP: Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto)
+ 5 AuthorsSandhi Maria Barreto42
Estimated H-index: 42
(UFMG: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais)
The association between life course socioeconomic position (SEP) and subclinical atherosclerosis is not consistent across studies. Socioeconomic adversities early in life are related to an increased probability of a low occupational grade and more stressful jobs in adulthood. However, the role of job stress in explaining the life course social gradient in subclinical atherosclerosis is unknown.
Published on Aug 1, 2015in The Lancet59.10
E. Theo Vos99
Estimated H-index: 99
(UW: University of Washington),
Ryan M Barber32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UW: University of Washington)
+ 676 AuthorsDaniel Dicker30
Estimated H-index: 30
(UW: University of Washington)
Background Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. Methods Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with...
Published on Feb 1, 2015in International Journal of Epidemiology7.34
Maria Inês Schmidt64
Estimated H-index: 64
(UFRGS: Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul),
Bruce Bartholow Duncan71
Estimated H-index: 71
(UFRGS: Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul)
+ 9 AuthorsMaria del Carmen B Molina2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UFRGS: Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul)
Chronic diseases are a global problem, yet information on their determinants is generally scant in low- and middle-income countries. The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) aims to contribute relevant information regarding the development and progression of clinical and subclinical chronic diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, in one such setting. At Visit 1, we enrolled 15105 civil servants from predefined universities or research institutes. Baseli...
Published on Jan 1, 2015
E. Theo Vos99
Estimated H-index: 99
,
Ryan M Barber32
Estimated H-index: 32
+ 674 AuthorsDaniel Dicker30
Estimated H-index: 30
BACKGROUND Up-to-date evidence about levels and trends in disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability (YLDs) is an essential input into global, regional, and national health policies. In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), we estimated these quantities for acute and chronic diseases and injuries for 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. METHODS Estimates were calculated for disease and injury incidence, prevalence, and YLDs using GBD 2010 methods with...
Published on Apr 1, 2014in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health3.87
Tabassum Z. Insaf5
Estimated H-index: 5
(SUNY: State University of New York System),
David S. Strogatz25
Estimated H-index: 25
(SUNY: State University of New York System)
+ 2 AuthorsBenjamin A. Shaw3
Estimated H-index: 3
(SUNY: State University of New York System)
Background Few studies have examined the degree to which racial disparities in the development of diabetes are accounted by differences in lifecourse socioeconomic position (SEP). We assessed the association between race, lifecourse SEP measures and prevalence of diabetes in a representative US sample of black and white adults. Methods A generalised estimating equations approach was used with a sample of 3497 adults from the Americans’ Changing Lives study. Sex-specific models were calculated to...
Published on Jul 2, 2013in PLOS Medicine
Silvia Stringhini19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UNIL: University of Lausanne),
G. David Batty67
Estimated H-index: 67
(UCL: University College London)
+ 5 AuthorsMika Kivimaeki118
Estimated H-index: 118
(UCL: University College London)
Background: Socioeconomic adversity in early life has been hypothesized to ‘‘program’’ a vulnerable phenotype with exaggerated inflammatory responses, so increasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in adulthood. The aim of this study is to test this hypothesis by assessing the extent to which the association between lifecourse socioeconomic status and type 2 diabetes incidence is explained by chronic inflammation. Methods and Findings: We use data from the British Whitehall II study, a pro...
Published on Jan 1, 2013in World Bank Publications
Francisco H. G. Ferreira39
Estimated H-index: 39
,
Julián Messina20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 3 AuthorsRenos Vakis19
Estimated H-index: 19
After decades of stagnation, the size of Latin America's middle class recently expanded to the point where, for the first time ever, the number of people in poverty is equal to the size of the middle class. This volume investigates the nature, determinants and possible consequences of this remarkable process of social transformation. We propose an original definition of the middle class, tailor-made for Latin America, centered on the concept of economic security and thus a low probability of fal...
Published on Nov 9, 2012
Luis-Felipe Lopez-Calva17
Estimated H-index: 17
(World Bank),
Maria Ana Lugo10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 3 AuthorsJamele Rigolini8
Estimated H-index: 8
After decades of stagnation, the size of the middle class in Latin America and the Caribbean recently expanded by 50 percent from 103 million people in 2003 to 152 million (or 30 percent of the continent's population) in 2009. Over the same period, as household incomes grew and inequality edged downward in most countries, the proportion of people in poverty fell markedly: from 44 percent to 30 percent. As a result, the middle class and the poor now account for roughly the same share of Latin Ame...
Published on Sep 1, 2012in Revista Brasileira De Epidemiologia
Deborah Carvalho Malta34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UFMG: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais),
Sara Araújo da Silva7
Estimated H-index: 7
+ 4 AuthorsLenildo de Moura19
Estimated H-index: 19
(UFRGS: Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul)
OBJETIVO: Analisar os fatores de risco e protecao para Doencas Cronicas Nao Transmissiveis - DCNT nas capitais do Brasil. METODOLOGIA: Foram analisadas informacoes provenientes do sistema de vigilância de fatores de risco e protecao para DCNT por inquerito telefonico - VIGITEL, em 2008. A amostra foi composta por 54 mil entrevistas sendo as frequencias apresentadas para o conjunto das capitais por sexo, faixa etaria e escolaridade. RESULTADOS: O estudo mostrou diferencas na prevalencia de fatore...
Cited By1
Newest
Published on Mar 1, 2017in International Journal of Public Health
Dayse Rodrigues de Sousa Andrade1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UFMG: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais),
Lidyane do Valle Camelo4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UFMG: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais)
+ 4 AuthorsSandhi Maria Barreto42
Estimated H-index: 42
(UFMG: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais)
Abstract Objectives To investigate whether life course exposure to adverse socioeconomic positions (SEP) as well as maintaining a low SEP or decreasing the SEP intra- and intergeneration was associated with an increased 10-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk predicted by the Framingham Risk Score. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data (2008–2010) of 13,544 active workers from ELSA-Brasil cohort. Maternal education, leg length, social class of first occupation and educati...