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Demographic, ecological, and physiological responses of ringed seals to an abrupt decline in sea ice availability

Published on Feb 2, 2017in PeerJ2.35
· DOI :10.7717/peerj.2957
Steven H. Ferguson32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Brent G. Young3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UM: University of Manitoba)
+ 3 AuthorsOle Nielsen7
Estimated H-index: 7
(Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
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  • References (79)
  • Citations (7)
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References79
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2017
G. Ottersen1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
C. Stenseth1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
W. Hurrell1
Estimated H-index: 1
Published on Dec 1, 2016in International Journal of Climatology3.60
Edward Hanna39
Estimated H-index: 39
(University of Sheffield),
Thomas E. Cropper8
Estimated H-index: 8
+ 1 AuthorsJ. Cappelen20
Estimated H-index: 20
(DMI: Danish Meteorological Institute)
We present an extended monthly and seasonal Greenland Blocking Index (GBI) from January 1851 to December 2015, which more than doubles the length of the existing published GBI series. We achieve this by homogenizing the Twentieth Century Reanalysis version 2c-based GBI and splicing it with the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis-based GBI. For the whole time period, there are significant decreases in GBI in autumn, October and November, and no significant monthly, seasonal or annual increases. More recently, s...
Published on Jul 1, 2016in Ecological Applications4.38
Nicholas J. Lunn13
Estimated H-index: 13
(U of A: University of Alberta),
Sabrina Servanty9
Estimated H-index: 9
(CSU: Colorado State University)
+ 3 AuthorsIan Stirling62
Estimated H-index: 62
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Changes in the abundance and distribution of wildlife populations are common consequences of historic and contemporary climate change. Some Arctic marine mammals, such as the polar bear (Ursus maritimus), may be particularly vulnerable to such changes due to the loss of Arctic sea ice. We evaluated the impacts of environmental variation on demographic rates for the Western Hudson Bay (WH), polar bear subpopulation from 1984 to 2011 using live-recapture and dead-recovery data in a Bayesian implem...
Published on May 1, 2016in Physiological and Biochemical Zoology1.87
Karyn D. Rode24
Estimated H-index: 24
,
Craig A. Stricker20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 9 AuthorsM. A. Brooks6
Estimated H-index: 6
AbstractThere has been considerable emphasis on understanding isotopic discrimination for diet estimation in omnivores. However, discrimination may differ for carnivores, particularly species that consume lipid-rich diets. Here, we examined the potential implications of several factors when using stable isotopes to estimate the diets of bears, which can consume lipid-rich diets and, alternatively, fast for weeks to months. We conducted feeding trials with captive brown bears (Ursus arctos) and p...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Ecology and Evolution2.42
David J. Yurkowski10
Estimated H-index: 10
(U of W: University of Windsor),
S. H. Ferguson10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
+ 5 AuthorsAaron T. Fisk47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of W: University of Windsor)
Individual specialization (IS), where individuals within populations irrespective of age, sex, and body size are either specialized or generalized in terms of resource use, has implications on ecological niches and food web structure. Niche size and degree of IS of near‐top trophic‐level marine predators have been little studied in polar regions or with latitude. We quantified the large‐scale latitudinal variation of population‐ and individual‐level niche size and IS in ringed seals (Pusa hispid...
Published on Mar 1, 2016
Martyn E. Obbard5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Marc Cattet10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 5 AuthorsCraig J. Greenwood2
Estimated H-index: 2
Sea ice is declining over much of the Arctic. In Hudson Bay the ice melts completely each summer, and advances in break-up have resulted in longer ice-free seasons. Consequently, earlier break-up is implicated in declines in body condition, survival, and abundance of polar bears (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1774) in the Western Hudson Bay (WH) subpopulation. We hypothesised that similar patterns would be evident in the neighbouring Southern Hudson Bay (SH) subpopulation. We examined trends 1980–2012...
Published on Mar 1, 2016in Oecologia2.92
David J. Yurkowski10
Estimated H-index: 10
(U of W: University of Windsor),
Steven H. Ferguson32
Estimated H-index: 32
(Fisheries and Oceans Canada)
+ 3 AuthorsAaron T. Fisk47
Estimated H-index: 47
(U of W: University of Windsor)
Spatial and temporal variation can confound interpretations of relationships within and between species in terms of diet composition, niche size, and trophic position (TP). The cause of dietary variation within species is commonly an ontogenetic niche shift, which is a key dynamic influencing community structure. We quantified spatial and temporal variations in ringed seal (Pusa hispida) diet, niche size, and TP during ontogeny across the Arctic—a rapidly changing ecosystem. Stable carbon and ni...
Published on Dec 18, 2015in Science41.04
Gerald Rustic3
Estimated H-index: 3
(CUNY: City University of New York),
Athanasios Koutavas13
Estimated H-index: 13
(LDEO: Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory)
+ 1 AuthorsBraddock K. Linsley32
Estimated H-index: 32
(LDEO: Lamont–Doherty Earth Observatory)
Tropical Pacific Ocean dynamics during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the Little Ice Age (LIA) are poorly characterized due to a lack of evidence from the eastern equatorial Pacific. We reconstructed sea surface temperature, El Nino–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) activity, and the tropical Pacific zonal gradient for the past millennium from Galapagos ocean sediments. We document a mid-millennium shift (MMS) in ocean-atmosphere circulation around 1500–1650 CE, from a state with dampened ENSO...
Published on Nov 1, 2015in Biology Letters3.32
Charmain D. Hamilton5
Estimated H-index: 5
,
Christian Lydersen46
Estimated H-index: 46
+ 1 AuthorsKit M. Kovacs50
Estimated H-index: 50
Since the first documentation of climate-warming induced declines in arctic sea-ice, predictions have been made regarding the expected negative consequences for endemic marine mammals. But, several decades later, little hard evidence exists regarding the responses of these animals to the ongoing environmental changes. Herein, we report the first empirical evidence of a dramatic shift in movement patterns and foraging behaviour of the arctic endemic ringed seal ( Pusa hispida ), before and after ...
Published on Oct 1, 2015in Science of The Total Environment5.59
Lizabeth Bowen13
Estimated H-index: 13
(USGS: United States Geological Survey),
A. Keith Miles17
Estimated H-index: 17
(USGS: United States Geological Survey)
+ 2 AuthorsTodd C. Atwood11
Estimated H-index: 11
(USGS: United States Geological Survey)
Abstract Populations of wildlife species worldwide experience incidents of mass morbidity and mortality. Primary or secondary drivers of these events may escape classical detection methods for identifying microbial insults, toxin exposure, or additional stressors. In 2012, 28% of polar bears sampled in a study in the southern Beaufort Sea region of Alaska had varying degrees of alopecia that was concomitant with reduced body condition. Concurrently, elevated numbers of sick or dead ringed seals ...
Cited By7
Newest
Published on Jun 1, 2019in Environmental Pollution5.71
Gabriel Boisvert (Carleton University), Christian Sonne41
Estimated H-index: 41
(AU: Aarhus University)
+ 2 AuthorsRobert J. Letcher66
Estimated H-index: 66
(Carleton University)
Abstract The bioaccumulation and biomagnification of 22 major perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were investigated in tissues of polar bears ( Ursus maritimus ) and their major prey species, the ringed seal ( Pusa hispida ), from the Scoresby Sound region of East Greenland. In polar bear liver the mean Σ 4 PFSA (perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acid) concentration (C 4 , C 6 , C 8 and C 10 ) was 2611 ± 202 ng/g wet weight (ww; 99% perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)) and two orders of magnitude higher than th...
Linnea E. Pearson3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks),
Linnea E. Pearson3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UAF: University of Alaska Fairbanks)
+ 2 AuthorsHeather E. M. Liwanag1
Estimated H-index: 1
(California Polytechnic State University)
Many animals exhibit ontogenetic changes associated with adaptations for survival. Harp seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus) live in the Arctic and rely on thick insulation to maintain thermal homeostasis. Adult harp seals primarily use blubber for insulation, but newborn harp seals rely on a lanugo pelt while nursing, as their blubber layer develops and their first-year pelage grows. This study compared ontogenetic changes in the thermal properties of harp seal pelts in water and in air. Thermal co...
Published on Jun 13, 2019in Population Ecology1.51
Steven H. Ferguson32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UM: University of Manitoba),
David J. Yurkowski10
Estimated H-index: 10
(UM: University of Manitoba)
+ 5 AuthorsGregory W. Thiemann18
Estimated H-index: 18
(York University)
Published on May 16, 2019in The Journal of Experimental Biology3.02
Emily S. Choy8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Emily S. Choy (McGill University)+ 2 AuthorsLisa L. Loseto (UM: University of Manitoba)
ABSTRACT Arctic marine ecosystems are currently undergoing rapid environmental changes. Over the past 20 years, individual growth rates of beluga whales ( Delphinapterus leucas ) have declined, which may be a response to climate change; however, the scarcity of physiological data makes it difficult to gauge the adaptive capacity and resilience of the species. We explored relationships between body condition and physiological parameters pertaining to oxygen (O 2 ) storage capacity in 77 beluga wh...
Published on May 1, 2019in Science of The Total Environment5.59
Magali Houde4
Estimated H-index: 4
(McGill University),
Xiaowa Wang17
Estimated H-index: 17
+ 6 AuthorsDerek C. G. Muir94
Estimated H-index: 94
Abstract Ringed seals ( Phoca hispida ) have been used as bioindicator species of environmental contamination in Canada since the 1970s. In the present study, seals were harvested during subsistence hunts in four regions of the Canadian Arctic: Beaufort Sea, Arctic Archipelago, Hudson Bay, and coastal Labrador. An extensive suite of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was determined in seal blubber collected for multiple years between 1972 and 2016. Results from this long-term study indicate ge...
Published on Apr 1, 2019in Ecological Applications4.38
Jody R. Reimer1
Estimated H-index: 1
(U of A: University of Alberta),
HalCaswell65
Estimated H-index: 65
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
+ 1 AuthorsMark A. Lewis53
Estimated H-index: 53
(U of A: University of Alberta)
Published on Jan 1, 2019
Kaarina Kauhala23
Estimated H-index: 23
,
Mikaela Bergenius4
Estimated H-index: 4
(SLU: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences)
+ 1 AuthorsJari Raitaniemi9
Estimated H-index: 9
The Baltic ringed seal (Pusa hispida botnica) population started to increase in numbers in the 1990s after a population decrease caused by hunting and environment pollutants. The annual growth rate of this population is about 5%, while in a fast-growing seal population, it could be as high as 10–12%. The reasons behind the fairly slow population growth rate are not known. In the current study, we investigated reproductive rate and nutritional status of ringed seals in the Bothnian Bay, the large...
Published on Jul 1, 2018in Canadian Journal of Zoology1.31
Steven H. Ferguson32
Estimated H-index: 32
(UM: University of Manitoba),
Xinhua Zhu (Fisheries and Oceans Canada)+ 4 AuthorsDerek C. G. Muir94
Estimated H-index: 94
We summarize geographical patterns in ringed seal (Pusa hispida (Schreber, 1775)) body length and girth growth using 3012 samples collected by Inuit hunters in the eastern Canadian Arctic from 1990 to 2016. Spatial structure was detected using cluster analysis of environmental variables separating a northern region in the eastern Canadian High Arctic and a southern region in Hudson Bay. The north was characterized by more fast ice, multiyear ice, greater snow depth, colder temperatures, and grea...
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Polar Biology2.00
Katie R. N. Florko (York University), Warren Bernhardt1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 4 AuthorsStephen D. Petersen6
Estimated H-index: 6
Harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) occur in the Arctic but little is known of their population abundance and natural history. In western Hudson Bay, they occur at lower numbers relative to ringed seals (Pusa hispida) and their distribution is largely unknown. However, a reduction in the duration of periods of ice cover in Hudson Bay may be shifting the habitat suitability of the region towards one that favours harbour seals. Harbour seal counts from a known haul-out site at the upstream extent of th...
Published on Jun 1, 2018in Polar Biology2.00
Charmain D. Hamilton5
Estimated H-index: 5
(University of Tromsø),
Kit M. Kovacs50
Estimated H-index: 50
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
+ 1 AuthorsChristian Lydersen46
Estimated H-index: 46
(NPI: Norwegian Polar Institute)
Hauling out onto a solid substrate is an integral part of most pinnipeds’ activity budgets. Ringed seals (Pusa hispida) are an Arctic species that hauls out on sea ice routinely throughout the year. In 2006, a sudden change in the sea-ice regime occurred in Svalbard (Norway). Amongst other changes, the amount of land-fast ice declined sharply. This study examined the intra- and inter-annual haul-out behaviour of 60 ringed seals equipped with Satellite Relay Data Loggers before [2002–2003 (n = 22...