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References59
Newest
Published on Dec 31, 2008in Protein Science2.42
Naomi E. Chayen33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Imperial College London),
Jonathan W. Radcliffe1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Imperial College London),
David M. Blow30
Estimated H-index: 30
(Imperial College London)
This work investigates the influence of storage of lysozyme in solution on its crystallization. The crystallization of hen egg-white lysozyme exhibits a storage effect (aging) that depends on the length of time the lysozyme solution is stored, after dissolving from freeze-dried powder, before being brought to crystallization conditions. The number of crystals obtained increases, while their size decreases, as the solution ages. Observations suggest that this effect is due to the presence of fung...
Published on Dec 31, 2008in Protein Science2.42
Emmanuel N. Saridakis50
Estimated H-index: 50
(Imperial College London),
Naomi E. Chayen33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Imperial College London)
A simple method for growing protein crystals in the metastable zone using the vapor diffusion technique is described. The coverslips holding the hanging drops are transferred, after being incubated for some time at conditions normally giving many small crystals, over reservoirs at concentrations that normally yield clear drops. Fewer, much larger and better diffracting crystals are obtained, compared with conventional crystallization at similar conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first rep...
Published on Jul 1, 2005in Progress in Biophysics & Molecular Biology2.70
Naomi E. Chayen33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Imperial College London)
The availability of high-quality crystals is crucial to the structure determination of proteins by X-ray diffraction. With the advent of structural genomics the pressure to produce crystals is greater than ever before. Finding favourable conditions for crystallisation is usually achieved by screening of the protein solution with numerous crystallising agents. Optimisation of the crystallisation conditions involves the manipulation of the crystallisation phase diagram with the aim of leading crys...
Published on Oct 1, 2004in Current Opinion in Structural Biology7.05
Naomi E. Chayen33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Imperial College London)
Protein crystallisation has gained a new strategic and commercial relevance in the post-genomic era because of its pivotal role in structural genomics. Producing high-quality crystals has always been a bottleneck to structure determination and, with the advent of proteomics, this problem is becoming increasingly acute. The task of producing suitable crystals may be tackled using two approaches. The first relies on empirical techniques that are based mainly on trial and error, and what is perceiv...
Published on Jan 1, 2004in Journal of Synchrotron Radiation
Hiroaki Tanaka8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Koji Inaka20
Estimated H-index: 20
+ 4 AuthorsSusumu Yoshitomi4
Estimated H-index: 4
We developed a new protein crystallization method using a simplified counter-diffusion method for optimizing crystallization condition. It is composed of only a single capillary, the gel in the silicon tube and the screw-top test tube, which are readily available in the laboratory. The one capillary can continuously scan a wide range of crystallization conditions (combination of the concentrations of the precipitant and the protein) unless crystallization occurs, which means that it corresponds ...
Published on Jan 1, 2004in Journal of Synchrotron Radiation
Allan D'Arcy26
Estimated H-index: 26
,
Aengus Mac Sweeney7
Estimated H-index: 7
,
Alexander Habera1
Estimated H-index: 1
The formation of nuclei in a crystallization experiment requires the interaction of protein molecules until a critical size of aggregate is created. In many crystallization screens sufficiently high levels of saturation are never reached to allow this critical nucleation event to occur. There are at least two possibilities to change this situation. The first is to increase the concentration of the protein and precipitating agent during the experiment to levels where spontaneous nucleation will o...
Naomi E. Chayen33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Imperial College London)
Structural genomics involves many steps in order to reach from Gene to structure. This article focuses on the crystallization step in this chain of tasks. It is becoming increasingly evident that the current high throughput procedures for crystallising proteins do not always produce the expected output of high quality crystals required for structure determination by x-ray crystallography. This problem is discussed and suggestions for raising the output are presented.
Published on Apr 1, 2003in Journal of Structural Biology3.75
Martin Caffrey54
Estimated H-index: 54
(OSU: Ohio State University)
Abstract The need for high-resolution structure information on membrane proteins is immediate and growing. Currently, the only reliable way to get it is crystallographically. The rate-limiting step from protein to structure is crystal production. An overview of the current ideas and experimental approaches prevailing in the area of membrane protein crystallization is presented. The long-established surfactant-based method has been reviewed extensively and is not examined in detail here. The focu...
Published on Apr 1, 2003in Journal of Applied Crystallography
J. Brown10
Estimated H-index: 10
,
Thomas S. Walter22
Estimated H-index: 22
+ 31 AuthorsSimon J. Davis51
Estimated H-index: 51
(John Radcliffe Hospital)
An initial tranche of results from day-to-day use of a robotic system for setting up 100 nl-scale vapour-diffusion sitting-drop protein crystallizations has been surveyed. The database of over 50 unrelated samples represents a snapshot of projects currently at the stage of crystallization trials in Oxford research groups and as such encompasses a broad range of proteins. The results indicate that the nanolitre-scale methodology consistently identifies more crystallization conditions than traditi...
Published on Apr 1, 2003in Journal of Structural Biology3.75
Joseph R. Luft28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UB: University at Buffalo),
Robert J. Collins5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Woodward, Inc.)
+ 3 AuthorsGeorge T. DeTitta25
Estimated H-index: 25
(UB: University at Buffalo)
Abstract A method to rationally predict crystallization conditions for a previously uncrystallized macromolecule has not yet been developed. One way around this problem is to determine initial crystallization conditions by casting a wide net, surveying a large number of chemical and physical conditions to locate crystallization leads. A facility that executes the rapid survey of crystallization lead conditions is described in detail. Results and guidelines for the initial screening of crystalliz...
Cited By2
Newest
Published on Jan 1, 2013in Sub-cellular biochemistry
Núria Verdaguer32
Estimated H-index: 32
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council),
Damià Garriga10
Estimated H-index: 10
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council),
Ignasi Fita43
Estimated H-index: 43
(CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)
For about 30 years X-ray crystallography has been by far the most powerful approach for determining virus structures at close to atomic resolutions. Information provided by these studies has deeply and extensively enriched and shaped our vision of the virus world. In turn, the ever increasing complexity and size of the virus structures being investigated have constituted a major driving force for methodological and conceptual developments in X-ray macromolecular crystallography. Landmarks of new...
Published on Jan 1, 2009in Advances in Protein Chemistry3.78
Naomi E. Chayen33
Estimated H-index: 33
(Imperial College London)
Abstract Structural genomics projects have led to great progress in the field of structural biology. Considerable advances have been made in the automation of all stages of the pipeline from clone to structure. This chapter focuses on crystallization that is one of the major bottlenecks in this pipeline. It discusses new developments and describes a variety of techniques for high-throughput screening and optimizing of conditions for crystallization.