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Perception, Action and the Notion of Grounding

Published on Jan 1, 2016
· DOI :10.1007/978-3-319-26485-1_27
Alexandros Tillas4
Estimated H-index: 4
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf),
Gottfried Vosgerau11
Estimated H-index: 11
(HHU: University of Düsseldorf)
Abstract
Traditionally, philosophers and cognitive scientists alike considered the mind as divided into input units (perception), central processing (cognition), and output units (action). In turn, they allowed for little – if any – direct interaction between perception and action. In recent years, theorists challenged the classical view of the mind by arguing that bodily states ground cognition. Even though promising, the notion of grounding is largely underspecified. In this paper, we focus on the debate about the relation between perception and action in order to flesh out the process and in turn clarify the notion of grounding. Given that currently the debate about the relation between perception & action is far from settled, we attempt an assessment of the implications that possible outcomes of this debate would have on Grounding Cognition Theories. Interestingly, some of these possible outcomes seem to threaten the overall program of Grounded Cognition. In an attempt to make this analysis more concrete, we study two closely related speculative hypotheses about possible ways in which perception and action interact. Namely, we focus on Theory of Event Coding and Simulation Theory, and evaluate the levels of compatibility between those two views and Grounded Cognition Theories.
  • References (34)
  • Citations (2)
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#1Arne M. Weber (HHU: University of Düsseldorf)H-Index: 3
#2Gottfried Vosgerau (HHU: University of Düsseldorf)H-Index: 11
In this paper we discuss an approach called grounded action cognition, which aims to provide a theory of the interdependencies between motor control and action-related cognitive processes, like perceiving an action or thinking about an action. The theory contrasts with traditional views in cognitive science in that it motivates an understanding of cognition as embodied, through application of Barsalou’s general idea of grounded cognition. To guide further research towards an appropriate theory o...
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#1Vittorio Gallese (University of Parma)H-Index: 73
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The aim of the present article is three-fold. First, it aims to show that perception requires action. This is most evident for some types of visual percept (e.g. space perception and action perception). Second, it aims to show that the distinction of the cortical visual processing into two streams is insufficient and leads to possible misunderstandings on the true nature of perceptual processes. Third, it aims to show that the dorsal stream is not only responsible for the unconscious control of ...
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