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Omega-3 fatty acids and mortality in patients referred for coronary angiography. The Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study.

Published on Sep 1, 2016in Atherosclerosis 4.47
· DOI :10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2016.06.049
Marcus E. Kleber47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Heidelberg University),
Graciela Delgado21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Heidelberg University)
+ 2 AuthorsClemens von Schacky26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
Abstract
Background Saturated fatty acids are thought to be harmful by increasing the risk for cardiovascular events. Objective We examined the associations of erythrocyte saturated fatty acids with total and cardiovascular mortality in patients referred for coronary angiography. Methods Red blood cell saturated fatty acid (RBC SFA) proportions were measured by gas chromatography at baseline in 3259 participants of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health study. Associations of saturated fatty acid concentrations with mortality were investigated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results During a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 975 patients (29.9%) died and 614 patients (18.8%) died of cardiovascular causes. The proportion of palmitic acid (PA, C16:0) ranged from 15.1% to 27.4% with a mean (standard deviation) of 21.9% (1.15%) and was associated with an increased risk for mortality in models adjusted for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. An increase of 1-standard deviation in PA was associated with a hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.08 (1.01–1.16) for all cause and 1.05 (0.96–1.15) for cardiovascular mortality after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. For the other investigated RBC SFA (C14:0, C18:0, C20:0, C22:0, and C24:0), there was no association with mortality and also not for the sum of all saturated fatty acids. Conclusions Our results reveal association with increased mortality risk only for PA but not for the other RBC SFAs or the sum of all RBC SFAs and emphasize the need to investigate each fatty acid individually rather than studying groups of fatty acids.
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  • Citations (26)
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References100
Newest
Published on Nov 1, 2017in The Lancet 53.25
Christopher E. Ramsden16
Estimated H-index: 16
(National Institutes of Health),
Anthony F. Domenichiello12
Estimated H-index: 12
(National Institutes of Health)
8 Citations Source Cite
Published on Nov 1, 2017in The Lancet 53.25
Mahshid Dehghan22
Estimated H-index: 22
(Population Health Research Institute),
Andrew Mente30
Estimated H-index: 30
(McMaster University)
+ 352 AuthorsAnders H. Rosengren84
Estimated H-index: 84
(University of Gothenburg)
Summary Background The relationship between macronutrients and cardiovascular disease and mortality is controversial. Most available data are from European and North American populations where nutrition excess is more likely, so their applicability to other populations is unclear. Methods The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study is a large, epidemiological cohort study of individuals aged 35–70 years (enrolled between Jan 1, 2003, and March 31, 2013) in 18 countries with a median fo...
168 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 21, 2017in Annual Review of Nutrition 8.89
Dong D. Wang19
Estimated H-index: 19
,
Frank B. Hu202
Estimated H-index: 202
Health effects of dietary fats have been extensively studied for decades. However, controversies exist on the effects of various types of fatty acids, especially saturated fatty acid (SFA), on cardiovascular disease (CVD). Current evidence supports that different types of dietary fatty acids have divergent effects on CVD risk, and the effects also depend strongly on the comparison or replacement macronutrient. A significant reduction in CVD risk can be achieved if SFAs are replaced by unsaturate...
21 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jun 1, 2017in European Journal of Nutrition 4.42
Clemens von Schacky26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich),
Adrian Passow1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Rosemarie Kiefl12
Estimated H-index: 12
(Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
Purpose High, but not low levels of trans-fatty acids (TFA) in erythrocytes are associated with increased mortality. Current erythrocyte TFA levels in Europe are not known.
7 Citations Source Cite
Published on Jan 1, 2017in Journal of Clinical Lipidology 3.58
Graciela Delgado21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Heidelberg University),
Bernhard K. Krämer47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Heidelberg University)
+ 3 AuthorsMarcus E. Kleber47
Estimated H-index: 47
(University of Jena)
Background The association of polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids with mortality has been extensively studied. Far less is known about the association of omega-9 monounsaturated fatty acids (omega-9 MUFA) with mortality. Objective We aimed to study the association of individual omega-MUFA with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Methods Omega-9 MUFA concentrations were measured in erythrocytes in 3259 patients participating in the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study...
7 Citations Source Cite
Jenifer I. Fenton23
Estimated H-index: 23
(Michigan State University),
Eric A. Gurzell6
Estimated H-index: 6
(Michigan State University)
+ 1 AuthorsWilliam S. Harris74
Estimated H-index: 74
(University of South Dakota)
Abstract Numerous clinical trials examining the use of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFAs) on various health outcomes have been conducted, and fish oil remains one of the most widely used nutritional supplements. More recently, studies have begun to utilize the omega-3 index, defined as the sum of EPA+DHA in red blood cells (RBCs), as both a biomarker of n-3 LCPUFA exposure and a potential risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Considerably less research evaluates...
12 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Data in Brief
Marcus E. Kleber47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Heidelberg University),
Graciela Delgado21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Heidelberg University)
+ 2 AuthorsClemens von Schacky26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
This paper contains additional data related to the research article “Omega-3 fatty acids and mortality in patients referred for coronary angiography – The Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study” (Kleber et al., in press) [1]. The data shows characteristics of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) study according to tertiles of omega-3 fatty acids as well as stratified by gender. The association of proportions of omega-3 fatty acids measured in erythrocyte membranes w...
4 Citations Source Cite
Published on Sep 1, 2016in Nutrition Research 2.71
William S. Harris74
Estimated H-index: 74
(University of South Dakota),
Serge Masson43
Estimated H-index: 43
+ 7 AuthorsRoberto Latini69
Estimated H-index: 69
Abstract The Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'Infarto Miocardico–Heart Failure (GISSI-HF) study reported benefits of n-3 fatty acid (FA) treatment on cardiovascular (CV) events, but the effects of treatment on a putative CV disease risk factor, the red blood cell (RBC) n-3 FA level (the omega-3 index), have not been examined in this context. We hypothesized that treatment with prescription omega-3 acid ethyl esters (O3AEE) would increase the omega-3 index to the proposed ca...
9 Citations Source Cite
Published on Aug 1, 2016in JAMA Internal Medicine 19.99
Dong D. Wang19
Estimated H-index: 19
(Harvard University),
Yanping Li43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Harvard University)
+ 5 AuthorsFrank B. Hu202
Estimated H-index: 202
(Harvard University)
Importance Previous studies have shown distinct associations between specific dietary fat and cardiovascular disease. However, evidence on specific dietary fat and mortality remains limited and inconsistent. Objective To examine the associations of specific dietary fats with total and cause-specific mortality in 2 large ongoing cohort studies. Design, Setting, and Participants This cohort study investigated 83 349 women from the Nurses’ Health Study (July 1, 1980, to June 30, 2012) and 42 884 me...
117 Citations Source Cite
Cited By26
Newest
Published on May 1, 2019in Food Chemistry 4.95
Marcello R. Silveira2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Federal Fluminense University),
Nathalia M. Coutinho2
Estimated H-index: 2
(Federal Fluminense University)
+ 15 AuthorsC. Senaka Ranadheera9
Estimated H-index: 9
(University of Melbourne)
Abstract The effect of cold plasma processing time and gas flow on bioactive compounds such as vitamin C, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, DPPH, angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, fatty acids profile, and volatile compounds of guava-flavored whey beverage was investigated. For comparative purposes, a pasteurized beverage was also manufactured. Cold plasma increased the concentration of bioactive and volatile compounds, and proportionated changes in the fatty acids profil...
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Hemodialysis International 1.24
Julie Ann Kemp1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Marta Esgalhado5
Estimated H-index: 5
+ 8 AuthorsDenis Fouque41
Estimated H-index: 41
(University of Lyon)
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Published on Apr 1, 2019in Physiological Reports
Benjamin Gollasch1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Charité),
Inci Dogan + 2 AuthorsFriedrich C. Luft107
Estimated H-index: 107
(Charité)
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Published on Feb 1, 2019in Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases 3.32
Daniel Medenwald5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg),
Alexander Kluttig20
Estimated H-index: 20
(Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg)
+ 1 AuthorsJ. Schumann
Abstract Background and Aims Diet is known to play a decisive role in the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). One factor believed to decrease lifetime risk of CHD is the consumption of omega-3 fatty acids. Yet, conclusive evidence regarding the potential cardioprotective effects of fatty acids is far from being reached. The present study aimed to provide further evidence on the association of serum fatty acid profiles with CHD risk. Methods and Results The CARdio-vascular Disease, Livin...
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Published on Dec 1, 2018
Viele Studien haben gezeigt, dass langkettige mehrfach ungesattigte Omega-3-Fettsauren (ω3-PUFAs), wie z. B. Eicosapentaensaure (EPA) und Docosahexaensaure (DHA), kardioprotektiv wirken. Man vermutet dabei einen positiven Effekt dieser Fettsauren auf die Eigenschaften der Zellmembran sowie eine Funktion als Ausgangssubstrate fur die Synthese antientzundlicher Substanzen wie Prostaglandine der Serie 3 und Leukotriene der Serie 5.
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Published on Sep 7, 2018in Journal of Nutrition 4.40
Annette L. West13
Estimated H-index: 13
(University of Southampton),
Grete Mørk Kindberg1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 1 AuthorsPhilip C. Calder101
Estimated H-index: 101
(University of Southampton)
2 Citations Source Cite
Clemens von Schacky26
Estimated H-index: 26
(Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich),
William S. Harris74
Estimated H-index: 74
(University of South Dakota)
Abstract As currently defined, the Omega-3 Index comprises eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), but not docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) in erythrocytes. In fish and many fish oils DPA is detectable (along with EPA and DHA), but sources rich in DPA are scarce. Purified DPA is available, and DPA is a precursor of biologically active molecules, but much remains to be learned about the effects of DPA in humans. In epidemiologic studies, erythrocyte DPA did not predict risk for tot...
1 Citations Source Cite
William S. Harris74
Estimated H-index: 74
(University of South Dakota)
Abstract The well-known health effects of the long-chain, marine omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids (FAs) has led to a growing interest in the prognostic value that blood levels of these FAs might have vis-a-vis cardiovascular and neurocognitive diseases. The measurement and expression of n-3 FA levels is not straight-forward, however, and a wide variety of means of expression of n-3 FA status have been used in research and clinical medicine. This has led to considerable confusion as to what “optimal” n-...
8 Citations Source Cite