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Omega-3 fatty acids and mortality in patients referred for coronary angiography. The Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study.

Published on Sep 1, 2016in Atherosclerosis4.25
· DOI :10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2016.06.049
Marcus E. Kleber47
Estimated H-index: 47
(Heidelberg University),
Graciela Delgado21
Estimated H-index: 21
(Heidelberg University)
+ 2 AuthorsClemens von Schacky26
Estimated H-index: 26
(LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)
Abstract
Background Saturated fatty acids are thought to be harmful by increasing the risk for cardiovascular events. Objective We examined the associations of erythrocyte saturated fatty acids with total and cardiovascular mortality in patients referred for coronary angiography. Methods Red blood cell saturated fatty acid (RBC SFA) proportions were measured by gas chromatography at baseline in 3259 participants of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health study. Associations of saturated fatty acid concentrations with mortality were investigated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results During a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 975 patients (29.9%) died and 614 patients (18.8%) died of cardiovascular causes. The proportion of palmitic acid (PA, C16:0) ranged from 15.1% to 27.4% with a mean (standard deviation) of 21.9% (1.15%) and was associated with an increased risk for mortality in models adjusted for conventional cardiovascular risk factors. An increase of 1-standard deviation in PA was associated with a hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.08 (1.01–1.16) for all cause and 1.05 (0.96–1.15) for cardiovascular mortality after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. For the other investigated RBC SFA (C14:0, C18:0, C20:0, C22:0, and C24:0), there was no association with mortality and also not for the sum of all saturated fatty acids. Conclusions Our results reveal association with increased mortality risk only for PA but not for the other RBC SFAs or the sum of all RBC SFAs and emphasize the need to investigate each fatty acid individually rather than studying groups of fatty acids.
  • References (100)
  • Citations (26)
References100
Newest
#1Clemens von Schacky (LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)H-Index: 26
#2Adrian PassowH-Index: 1
Last.Rosemarie Kiefl (LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)H-Index: 12
view all 3 authors...
#1Massimo F. Piepoli (European Society of Cardiology)H-Index: 8
#2Arno W. Hoes (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 81
Last.Christi Deaton (European Society of Cardiology)H-Index: 11
view all 26 authors...
#1Jenifer I. Fenton (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 23
#2Eric A. Gurzell (MSU: Michigan State University)H-Index: 6
Last.William S. Harris (USD: University of South Dakota)H-Index: 74
view all 4 authors...
#1Marcus E. Kleber (Heidelberg University)H-Index: 47
#2Graciela Delgado (Heidelberg University)H-Index: 21
Last.Clemens von Schacky (LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)H-Index: 26
view all 5 authors...
Cited By26
Newest
#1C. von Schacky (LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)H-Index: 11
#1Lara T. Meital (University of the Sunshine Coast)H-Index: 2
#2Mark Windsor (University of the Sunshine Coast)H-Index: 2
Last.Jonathan Golledge (JCU: James Cook University)H-Index: 46
view all 14 authors...
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