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The lives of others: Third parties' responses to others' injustice.

Published on Jan 1, 2016in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
· DOI :10.1037/apl0000040
Jane O'Reilly5
Estimated H-index: 5
(U of O: University of Ottawa),
Karl Aquino43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UBC: University of British Columbia),
Daniel P. Skarlicki36
Estimated H-index: 36
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
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  • References (86)
  • Citations (13)
Cite
References86
Newest
Published on Jun 19, 2015
Joel Brockner54
Estimated H-index: 54
,
Jerald Greenberg52
Estimated H-index: 52
Published on Jan 1, 2015in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Tara C. Reich10
Estimated H-index: 10
(LSE: London School of Economics and Political Science),
M. Sandy Hershcovis13
Estimated H-index: 13
(UM: University of Manitoba)
Abstract Interpersonal mistreatment at work often occurs in the presence of others; however, these “others” are rarely examined in empirical research despite their importance to the context of the negative interaction. We conducted 2 experiments to examine how witnessing incivility affects observer reactions toward instigators and targets. In Study 1, participants (N = 60) worked virtually with an ostensible instigator and target. In Study 2, participants (N = 48) worked in vivo with confederate...
Published on Aug 1, 2014in Psychological Science4.90
Isaac H. Smith6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UofU: University of Utah),
Karl Aquino43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
+ 1 AuthorsJesse Graham24
Estimated H-index: 24
(SC: University of Southern California)
Throughout history, principles such as obedience, loyalty, and purity have been instrumental in binding people together and helping them thrive as groups, tribes, and nations. However, these same principles have also led to in-group favoritism, war, and even genocide. Does adhering to the binding moral foundations that underlie such principles unavoidably lead to the derogation of out-group members? We demonstrated that for people with a strong moral identity, the answer is “no,” because they ar...
Published on Jul 1, 2013in Human Relations3.37
Rebecca L. Greenbaum11
Estimated H-index: 11
(OSU: Oklahoma State University–Stillwater),
Mary B. Mawritz10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 1 AuthorsManuela Priesemuth3
Estimated H-index: 3
We extend the deontic model of justice (Folger, 1998, 2001) by arguing that not all employees respond to third-party injustices by experiencing an eye-for-an-eye retributive response; rather, some employees respond in ways that are higher in moral acceptance (e.g. increasing turnover intentions, engaging in constructive resistance). We predict that the positive relationship between supervisor abuse of customers and organizational deviance is weaker when employees are high in moral identity. In c...
Published on Apr 1, 2013in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Elizabeth E. Umphress15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UW: University of Washington),
Aneika L. Simmons6
Estimated H-index: 6
(SHSU: Sam Houston State University)
+ 2 AuthorsRamona Bobocel1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UW: University of Waterloo)
Summary The present research contributes to a growing literature on observer reactions to injustice experienced by others. In particular, we separated two variables that have previously been confounded in prior research, namely perpetrator intent to cause harm and victim perception of harm. We expected that injustice intent and injustice perceptions would have both unique and joint effects on observer reactions. The results of three experiments in which we manipulated perpetrator injustice inten...
Published on Jan 27, 2012
Charles Duhigg1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
David Barboza1
Estimated H-index: 1
Customers care more about low costs than tough work conditions endured by workforce of Apple’s suppliers in Asia
Published on Jan 1, 2012in Journal of Applied Psychology5.07
Katherine A. DeCelles11
Estimated H-index: 11
(U of T: University of Toronto),
D. Scott DeRue24
Estimated H-index: 24
(UM: University of Michigan)
+ 1 AuthorsTara L. Ceranic1
Estimated H-index: 1
(USD: University of San Diego)
Does power corrupt a moral identity, or does it enable a moral identity to emerge? Drawing from the power literature, we propose that the psychological experience of power, although often associated with promoting self-interest, is associated with greater self-interest only in the presence of a weak moral identity. Furthermore, we propose that the psychological experience of power is associated with less self-interest in the presence of a strong moral identity. Across a field survey of working a...
Published on Jul 1, 2011in Academy of Management Review10.63
Jane O'Reilly5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UBC: University of British Columbia),
Karl Aquino43
Estimated H-index: 43
(UBC: University of British Columbia)
We present a theory of why some people who witness or learn about acts of mistreatment against others in organizations are more likely to recognize this injustice and become personally involved. Drawing from theories of moral identity, moral intuitions, and self-regulation, we explain third parties' morally motivated responses to mistreatment and consider the role of power and belief in the disciplinary system in this process. We discuss implications of the theory and propose future research dir...
Published on Mar 1, 2011in Administrative Science Quarterly8.02
Chen-Bo Zhong21
Estimated H-index: 21
(U of T: University of Toronto)
Research on ethical decision making has been heavily influenced by normative decision theories that view intelligent choices as involving conscious deliberation and analysis. Recent developments in moral psychology, however, suggest that moral functions involved in ethical decision making are metaphorical and embodied. The research presented here suggests that deliberative decision making may actually increase unethical behaviors and reduce altruistic motives when it overshadows implicit, intuit...
Cited By13
Newest
Published on Aug 28, 2019in Journal of Management9.06
Xiaowan Lin (UM: University of Macau), Raymond Loi23
Estimated H-index: 23
(UM: University of Macau)
To shed light on the paradoxical phenomenon that third parties of interpersonal mistreatment are motivated to restore justice but often engage in unethical actions, this research differentiates bet...
Ryan Fehr12
Estimated H-index: 12
(UW: University of Washington),
David T. Welsh7
Estimated H-index: 7
(ASU: Arizona State University)
+ 3 AuthorsManuel Vaulont (ASU: Arizona State University)
Abstract In this paper we explore the antecedents and consequences of employees’ unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB) through the lens of moral decoupling—a moral reasoning process whereby individuals separate their perceptions of morality from their perceptions of performance. First, we argue that employees increase their engagement in UPBs when they (1) see their supervisors doing the same and (2) believe that their supervisors endorse moral decoupling. Second, we argue that employees’ ...
Published on Dec 7, 2018in Journal of Management9.06
Lindsay Y. Dhanani4
Estimated H-index: 4
(OU: Ohio University),
Lindsay Y. Dhanani (OU: Ohio University), Matthew L. LaPalme (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)
Recent advancements in the area of workplace mistreatment have begun to challenge our view of who is affected by this phenomenon. Whereas it was initially assumed that mistreatment affected a small subset of employees who were directly targeted by negative treatment, empirical work has documented that employees who observe or become aware of others being mistreated are also adversely affected. However, the extant literature examining vicarious mistreatment has developed in silos centered around ...
Published on Jun 26, 2019in Ethics & Behavior0.94
Chenjing Gan (NBU: Ningbo University), Linbo Yang (NBU: Ningbo University)+ 1 AuthorsDuanxu Wang2
Estimated H-index: 2
(ZJU: Zhejiang University)
Published on May 9, 2019in Journal of Organizational Behavior5.00
Rebecca L. Greenbaum11
Estimated H-index: 11
,
Rebecca L. Greenbaum1
Estimated H-index: 1
(RU: Rutgers University)
+ 1 AuthorsMary B. Mawritz10
Estimated H-index: 10
Abstract We propose that status incentives weaken the relationship between moral behaviors and status conferral by undermining perceptions of authenticity. Across two experiments among diverse samples of participants, evidence indicates that observers question the authenticity of moral actors who are pursuing status incentives. Perceptions of authenticity mediate the interaction of moral behaviors and status incentives on status conferral. A third two-wave online survey replicates the experiment...
Published on Mar 1, 2019in Journal of Management9.06
Manuela Priesemuth3
Estimated H-index: 3
(Villanova University),
Marshall Schminke29
Estimated H-index: 29
(UCF: University of Central Florida)
This article examines employee reactions to observing abusive supervision at work. Specifically, we integrate deonance theory with fairness theory and social cognitive theory to explore when and why employees who witness abuse toward a coworker engage in prosocial behavior intended to protect the victim. We first develop a moderated mediation model of prosocial responses to abuse, which identifies overall fairness as a first- and second-stage moderator, influencing the relationships between obse...
Published on Feb 1, 2019in Management and labour studies
Subhra Pattnaik (Xavier University), Santosh Kumar Tripathy1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Utkal University)
Organizational justice has come a long way in the last six decades. Through the 1950s until the 2000s, it diverged from being a single-dimensional construct (distributive justice) to a four-dimensional construct (distributive, procedural, interpersonal and informational justice). However, by the mid-1980s, it again started moving towards convergence in the form of integrative and overall justice. This article provides a comprehensive timeline review of major historical milestones in this interes...
Published on Oct 18, 2018in Health Communication1.85
Chris Skurka1
Estimated H-index: 1
(Cornell University)
ABSTRACTOne proposed solution to address childhood obesity is to limit children’s exposure to advertising for sugar-sweetened beverages. Might persuasive appeals be able to channel anger toward the soda industry in order to promote support for marketing regulations and increase intentions to engage in activism around this issue? This study sought to answer this question by drawing on research in communication and psychology about the relationships between anger, persuasion, and activism-related ...