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Impact of homogeneous and heterogeneous parceling strategies when latent variables represent multidimensional constructs.

Published on Jan 1, 2016in Psychological Methods8.19
· DOI :10.1037/met0000047
David A. Cole53
Estimated H-index: 53
,
Corinne E. Perkins1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Rachel L. Zelkowitz8
Estimated H-index: 8
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Abstract
Many researchers are interested in using structural equation models to test theoretical relations among multidimensional constructs; however, logistical constraints often prevent researchers from obtaining multiple measures. The current study examines the implications for such models when a latent variable is extracted from carefully constructed parcels of items obtained from a single multidimensional measure of the multidimensional target construct. Two parceling methods are compared. One is homogeneous parceling, in which items are pooled so that each parcel represents a single lower order dimension of the higher order construct. The other is heterogeneous parceling, in which items are pooled so that each parcel represents all lower order dimensions of the higher order construct. Results of simulated and real data analysis reveal that both approaches can result in models that fit the data well; however, conceptual-theoretical differences exist in the nature of the latent variables that are extracted from homogeneous versus heterogeneous parcels. Additionally, compared with homogeneous parceling, heterogeneous parceling generates smaller (i.e., closer to zero) but tighter estimates of structural path coefficients, the net result of which is greater statistical power to test substantive relations among latent variables. Beyond parceling, implications surface about the nature of latent variables that emerge when the underlying constructs are multidimensional. (PsycINFO Database Record
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Jaclyn M. Kamradt3
Estimated H-index: 3
(UI: University of Iowa),
Molly A. Nikolas15
Estimated H-index: 15
(UI: University of Iowa)
+ 4 AuthorsStephen P. Becker1
Estimated H-index: 1
(UC: University of Cincinnati)
Despite the importance of daily life executive functioning (EF) for college students’ success, few measures exist that have been validated in college students specifically. This study examined the ...
Fanita A. Tyrell (UMN: University of Minnesota), Tuppett M. Yates17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UCR: University of California, Riverside)
+ 2 AuthorsWilliam V. Fabricius20
Estimated H-index: 20
(ASU: Arizona State University)
Longitudinal measurement invariance is a major concern for developmental scholars who seek to evaluate the same underlying construct across time. Unfortunately, discontinuities in the expression of various psychological constructs, as well as essential changes in measurement that are necessitated by shifting developmental capacities and practice effects over time, make the task of establishing longitudinal invariance extremely difficult. Drawing on 5 waves of longitudinal data from 392 families ...
Published on Feb 12, 2019in Multivariate Behavioral Research2.14
Sonya K. Sterba16
Estimated H-index: 16
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
AbstractIn structural equation modeling applications, parcels—averages or sums of subsets of item scores—are often used as indicators of latent constructs. Parcel-allocation variability (PAV) is variability in results that arises within sample across alternative item-to-parcel allocations. PAV can manifest in all results of a parcel-level model (e.g., model fit, parameter estimates, standard errors, and inferential decisions). It is a source of uncertainty in parcel-level model results that can ...
Published on Aug 1, 2018in Psychological Assessment3.47
David A. Cole53
Estimated H-index: 53
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University),
Sherryl H. Goodman43
Estimated H-index: 43
(Emory University)
+ 7 AuthorsKatherine E. Korelitz5
Estimated H-index: 5
(Vandy: Vanderbilt University)
Published on Mar 29, 2018in Frontiers in Psychology2.13
Barbara Nevicka4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UvA: University of Amsterdam),
Annebel H. B. De Hoogh16
Estimated H-index: 16
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
+ 1 AuthorsFrank D. Belschak17
Estimated H-index: 17
(UvA: University of Amsterdam)
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