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Landscape changes have greater effects than climate changes on six insect pests in China.

Published on Jun 1, 2016in Science China-life Sciences3.58
· DOI :10.1007/s11427-015-4918-0
Zihua Zhao11
Estimated H-index: 11
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences),
Hardev S. Sandhu9
Estimated H-index: 9
(UF: University of Florida)
+ 1 AuthorsFeng Ge28
Estimated H-index: 28
(CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)
Abstract
In recent years, global changes are the major causes of frequent, widespread outbreaks of pests in mosaic landscapes, which have received substantial attention worldwide. We collected data on global changes (landscape and climate) and economic damage caused by six main insect pests during 1951–2010 in China. Landscape changes had significant effects on all six insect pests. Pest damage increased significantly with increasing arable land area in agricultural landscapes. However, climate changes had no effect on damage caused by pests, except for the rice leaf roller (Cnaphalocrocis medinalis Guenee) and armyworm (Mythimna separate (Walker)), which caused less damage to crops with increasing mean temperature. Our results indicate that there is slight evidence of possible offset effects of climate changes on the increasing damage from these two agricultural pests. Landscape changes have caused serious outbreaks of several species, which suggests the possibility of the use of landscape design for the control of pest populations through habitat rearrangement. Landscape manipulation may be used as a green method to achieve sustainable pest management with minimal use of insecticides and herbicides.
  • References (52)
  • Citations (7)
References52
Newest
#1Zihua Zhao (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
#2Fang Ouyang (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 9
Last.Feng Ge (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 28
view all 3 authors...
#1Stephen J. Simpson (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 81
#2Fiona J. Clissold (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 21
Last.David Raubenheimer (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 66
view all 6 authors...
#1Zihua Zhao (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
#2Cang Hui (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 31
Last.Feng Ge (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 28
view all 4 authors...
#1Zihua Zhao (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
#2Cang Hui (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 31
Last.Feng Ge (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 28
view all 7 authors...
#1Zihua Zhao (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 11
#2Peijian Shi (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 14
Last.Feng Ge (CAS: Chinese Academy of Sciences)H-Index: 28
view all 5 authors...
#1Vesna Gagic (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 12
#2Sebastian Hänke (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 4
Last.Teja Tscharntke (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 105
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Cited By7
Newest
#1Xianghu Zhao (ECUST: East China University of Science and Technology)
#2Chunmei Li (ECUST: East China University of Science and Technology)H-Index: 1
Last.Song Cao (ECUST: East China University of Science and Technology)
view all 7 authors...
#1Yi Zou (Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University)H-Index: 8
#2Joop de Kraker (OU: Open University)H-Index: 11
Last.Wopke van der Werf (WUR: Wageningen University and Research Centre)H-Index: 26
view all 8 authors...
#1Zihua Zhao (CAU: China Agricultural University)H-Index: 11
#2Jing Wei (CAU: China Agricultural University)H-Index: 1
Last.Rong ZhangH-Index: 1
view all 9 authors...
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